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Course Descriptions

  • COUN 520: Theory and Practice of Counseling

    An introduction of, and initial preparation for, the profession of counseling. Behavioral and professional expectations of counselors are emphasized. The course provides an overview of theories and techniques of counseling and psychotherapy with concentration on comprehensive analysis of each theory. Skills in intake assessment, treatment planning, brief and long-term models, crisis intervention, and prevention strategies are developed. This course must be taken at Milligan College; no transfer credit will allowed for this course. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

  • COUN 527: Physiological Psychology and Psychopharmacology

    An examination of current developments in the fields of physiological psychology and psychopharmacology. The course includes an exploration of the physiological bases of emotion, sleep, sexual behavior, hunger and thirst, learning and memory, psychopathology, and drug use and abuse. Focus is given to basic classifications and indications of commonly prescribed psychopharmacological medications. The appropriate uses of these medications, as well as the identification of their effects and side effects, are emphasized. Offered every spring. Three semester hours.

  • COUN 530: Child and Adult Psychopathology

    An introduction to the evaluation and classification of abnormal human behavior and psychiatric disorders according to current standards of classification. Includes instruction in purpose and use of DSM.. Offered spring term each year. Four semester hours.

  • COUN 535: Child Sexual Abuse

    An examination of current research and theory regarding child sexual abuse, including prevalence, causes, dynamics, consequences, and prevention. Attention is given to treatment approaches and techniques in working with individuals and families involved in sexual abuse situations. Offered intermittently. Three semester hours.

  • COUN 540: Cultural Diversity in Counseling

    A concentration on the development and enhancement of multi-cultural and ethnic awareness and how this impacts counseling. The course is designed to help counselors maximize their effectiveness in working with clients from different cultures and sub-cultures. Includes counseling skills that are effective with clients with various disabilities, races, religions, sexual orientations, and economic backgrounds. Prerequisite: COUN 520. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

  • COUN 545: Crisis Intervention

    A survey of specific theoretical models and therapeutic techniques used in crisis intervention and their application to situations encountered in clinical practice including suicide, family and interpersonal violence, survival of disasters and catastrophes, and developmental crises experienced throughout the lifespan. Students gain both knowledge and confidence in their ability to deal with crises. Prerequisite: COUN 500. Offered intermittently. Three semester hours.

  • COUN 550: Legal and Ethical Issues

    An intensive overview of legal, ethical, and professional issues in the provision of counseling services in a variety of settings. Includes review of Tennessee laws, the American Counseling Association code of ethics and related codes as appropriate. Steps in ethical decision-making are discussed and case studies are presented. Students gain an understanding of the need for ethical standards and learn how to follow ethical guidelines. Prerequisite: COUN 520. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

  • COUN 553: Theories of Personality

    An in-depth examination of the major theoretical approaches to the study of personality. Personality development, dynamics and differences are studied with special concentration on application of each theoretical view to the counseling setting. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

  • COUN 555: Professional Roles and Practices of School Counselors

    An orientation to the school counseling profession and the roles of professional school counselors. This course examines planning, designing, implementing, and evaluating a comprehensive and developmental guidance and counseling program that includes students, teachers, administrators, parents, and community members. The course also examines state and national counseling program models and required competencies. Legal and ethical issues in school counseling also are discussed. Prerequisite: COUN 520. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

  • COUN 560: Assessment and Evaluation Techniques

    A history and overview of the standardized evaluation methods commonly used in the assessment of individuals and groups. Topics covered are validity, reliability, and statistical concepts for the evaluation and interpretation of test data. Also includes an overview of the various categories of psychological tests and the better-validated tests within each category. Students gain skills in the ethical and professional selection, administration, scoring, and interpretation of commonly used aptitude, achievement, and interest tests. Prerequisite: COUN 520. Prerequisite or corequisite: COUN 530.Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

  • COUN 580: Substance Abuse Counseling

    An introduction to the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of substance abuse and substance dependence. Focuses on the impact substance abuse and substance dependence can have on individual, marital, family, and vocational problems. Prerequisites: COUN 520, COUN 530. Offered intermittently. Three semester hours.

  • COUN 600: Integration of Faith and Learning Seminar

    An ongoing discussion and examination of the theoretical and practical aspects of the integration of faith and learning. Offered both fall and spring terms each year. Students must take this course four times. One-half semester hour.

  • COUN 610: Group Dynamics and Group Counseling

    An introduction to group dynamics and group counseling with concentration on theoretical and practical issues. Reviews historical perspectives, popular treatment techniques, empirical evidence on treatment efficacy, ethical and legal issues, and integration considerations. Prerequisite: COUN 520. Offered May or summer term each year. Three semester hours.

  • COUN 620: Career Counseling

    An introduction to methods used in counseling clients about career-related decisions. Provides an overview of test instruments used to evaluate skills and aptitudes, methods to give guidance for training and job placement, and job interview strategies. Prerequisite: COUN 520. Offered summer term each year. Three semester hours.

  • COUN 625: Marriage and Family Counseling

    An examination of several leading contemporary theories of marriage and family counseling, with concentration on the techniques used within each of those theories. Prerequisite: COUN 520. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

  • COUN 630: Treatment Planning

    A review of current models of treatment planning for the DSM disorders most commonly encountered by Master’s-level counselors. Prerequisite: COUN 520, COUN 530. Offered intermittently. Three semester hours.

  • COUN 644: Child and Adolescent Assessment

    Advanced training in the use of psychological assessment instruments for the evaluation of children and adolescents experiencing emotional, behavioral, or academic problems. Preparation of evaluations, recommendations, and report writing for presentation of information to family and professionals is emphasized. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

  • COUN 645: Child and Adolescent Counseling

    A survey of psychotherapeutic approaches and techniques for child and adolescent problems. This survey is conducted within a strong developmental framework. Emphasizes empirically supported psychotherapeutic programs for specific disorder presentations and conceptual skills necessary for effectively intervening with children, adolescents, and their parents. Prerequisites: COUN 520, COUN 530. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

  • COUN 648: Evidence-Based Counseling Techniques

    A study of counseling techniques that have been supported by systematic empirical research. Concentration is placed on applying specific empirically-supported interventions to specific problems. Prerequisites: COUN 520, COUN 530. Offered summer term each year. Three semester hours.

  • COUN 650: Counseling for Grief and Loss

    An examination of experiences of loss and the process of grieving in order to learn how the normal grieving process occurs, and how counselors can address with sensitivity the needs of individuals who experience loss and those who are survivors of loss. Includes a focus on the types of loss that occur, developmental issues, hospice and other settings for palliative care, issues of unexpected death resulting from acute illness or traumatic injury, as well as insidious illnesses, and support for other caregivers and self. Prerequisites: COUN 520, COUN 530. Offered intermittently. Three semester hours.

  • COUN 670: Christian Perspectives on Counseling

    An in-depth consideration of psychological theories and ethics within the context of Christian faith. Focus is given to areas of agreement and disagreement among theories of counseling, theological perspectives, and Christian principles. Ethical and legal issues from both psychology and Christianity are discussed. Prerequisite: COUN 520. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

  • COUN 680: Research Methods

    An examination of the array of research and statistical methods used in the behavioral sciences and helping professions. Concentration is placed on critically evaluating psychological research and understanding its application to counseling. Prerequisites: MATH 213 or PSYC 259 or equivalent. Offered summer term each year. Three semester hours.

  • COUN 690: Practicum in Counseling

    Introductory experience in supervised counseling with clients in selected clinical settings. Students are supervised by the course instructor and a field supervisor and receive feedback from supervisors in order to develop counseling skills. Practicum is arranged with the Clinical Director in the semester prior to beginning the practicum. A minimum of 100 clock hours of supervised experience is required. Liability insurance is required. Prerequisites: COUN 520, 550, at least 9 hours completed in program, permission of instructor. Offered each term. Three semester hours.

  • COUN 691: School Counseling Internship I

    Supervised internship in elementary and/or secondary school settings. The internship will be equivalent to being half-time in the school setting for a semester (300 hours). This will include a variety of activities that a school counselor is expected to perform. At least 120 clock hours are required in direct client contact, individual counseling, group work, developmental classroom guidance, and parent/community conferences. This will be done under the supervision of a licensed school counselor and will also include consultation with an assigned faculty supervisor. The internship will be a cooperative effort planned by Milligan College, a local school system, and the student. Students must apply for internship at least one full semester in advance. Liability insurance is required. Prerequisites: COUN 690, at least 23 hours completed in program, and permission of instructor. Offered each term. Three semester hours.

  • COUN 692: Internship I

    Intermediate experience in supervised counseling with clients in selected clinical settings. Students are supervised by the course instructor and a field supervisor and receive feedback from supervisors in order to continue to develop their counseling skills. Internship is arranged with the Clinical Director in the semester prior to beginning the internship. A minimum of 300 clock hours of supervised experience is required. Liability insurance is required. Prerequisites: COUN 690, at least 20 hours completed in program, permission of instructor. Offered each term. Three semester hours.

  • COUN 693: School Counseling Internship II

    Supervised internship in elementary and/or secondary school settings. NOTE: If COUN 691 took place in only one of these school settings, COUN 693 must involve experiences in the other school setting. The internship will be equivalent to being half-time in the school setting for a semester (300 hours). This will include a variety of activities that a school counselor is expected to perform. At least 120 clock hours are required in direct client contact, individual counseling, group work, developmental classroom guidance, and parent/community conferences. This will be done under the supervision of a licensed school counselor and will also include consultation with an assigned faculty supervisor. The internship will be a cooperative effort planned by Milligan College, a local school system, and the student. Students must apply for internship at least one full semester in advance. Liability insurance is required. Prerequisites: COUN 690, at least 23 hours completed in program, and permission of instructor. Corequisite: COUN 691. Offered each term. Three semester hours.

  • COUN 694: Internship II

    Advanced experience in supervised counseling with clients in selected clinical settings. This course is taken during the last semester of the student’s program. The internship may be concurrent with other courses or may occur after coursework is completed. Students are supervised by the course instructor and a field supervisor and receive feedback from supervisors in order to enhance their counseling skills. Internship is arranged with the Clinical Director in the semester prior to beginning the internship. A minimum of 300 clock hours in an approved facility under the supervision of an appropriately trained and licensed mental health professional is required. Liability insurance is required. Prerequisites: COUN 692, at least 20 hours completed in program, permission of instructor. Offered each term. Three semester hours.

  • ECON 170: Personal Finance

    An overview of personal and family financial planning with an emphasis on financial record keeping, planning spending, tax planning, consumer credit, making buying decisions, purchasing insurance, selecting investments, and retirement and estate planning. Offered every term. Three semester hours.

  • ECON 201: Macroeconomic Principles

    A comprehensive study of demand and supply, private and public economic sectors, national income accounting, theories of employment, business cycles, and economic growth. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

  • ECON 201B: Macroeconomic Principles

    A comprehensive study of demand and supply, private and public economic sectors, national income accounting, theories of employment, business cycles, and economic growth. Three semester hours.

  • ECON 201M: Macroeconomic Principles

    A comprehensive study of demand and supply, private and public economic sectors, national income accounting, theories of employment, business cycles, and economic growth. Offered summer term each year. Three semester hours.

  • ECON 202: Microeconomic Principles

    A comprehensive study of economic decision making at an individual consumer and firm level. Particular attention is paid to the theories of consumer and firm behavior as well as the demand for and efficient utilization of resources. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

  • ECON 202B: Microeconomic Principles

    A comprehensive study of economic decision making at an individual consumer and firm level. Particular attention is paid to the theories of consumer and firm behavior as well as the demand for and efficient utilization of resources. Three semester hours.

  • ECON 290: Independent Study

    Individual study to enable the student either to study material not in the curriculum or to facilitate an individualized approach in a field not now covered in a single course. Not open to freshmen. One to three semester hours.

  • ECON 301: Corporate Finance

    A study of the basic financial structure of the corporate type of business enterprise. Concentration is given to the various methods of financing and to the role that management plays in determining financial policy. Prerequisite: ECON 202 and ACCT 212. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

  • ECON 301B: Corporate Finance

    A study of the basic financial structure of the corporate type of business enterprise. Concentration is given to the various methods of financing and to the role that management plays in determining financial policy. Prerequisite: ACCT 212B. Three semester hours.

  • ECON 311: Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory

    Intermediate analysis of demand and supply, private and public economic sectors, national income accounting, theories of employment, business cycles, and economic growth. 3 semester hours. Prerequisites: ECON 201 and MATH 211. Offered fall term even years.

  • ECON 312: Intermediate Microeconomic Theory

    Intermediate analysis of economic decision making at an individual consumer and firm level. Particular attention is paid to the theories of consumer and firm behavior as well as the demand for and efficient utilization of resources. 3 semester hours. Prerequisites: ECON 202 and MATH 211. Offered spring term odd years.

  • ECON 331: Comparative Economic Systems

    An introduction to the comparative study of economic systems, their underlying ideological foundations, and institutional arrangements. The historical and political context of various systems is analyzed along with the central organizational features of the major types of economic systems. The major topics covered are: the origins of capitalism; capitalism in theory and as an existing system; market-oriented economies; the Japanese economy; and the changing Chinese economic order. Special concentration is given to the attempts at transition from centrally planned economies to market-oriented structures in the former USSR and Eastern Europe. Offered summer term each year as part of IBI program. Three semester hours.

  • ECON 340: Managerial Economics

    The application of economic theory and quantitative methods for solving business problems. Concentration is on the analysis of demand, cost, and profit under conditions of imperfect information and uncertainty. Business pricing strategies receive special attention. Prerequisites: ECON 201 and 202. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

  • ECON 350: International Trade and Finance

    A survey of the analytical and institutional aspects of international trade and finance. The historical and contextual elements are the foundation for the examination of current theoretical and empirical approaches to international economic and business relations. Offered spring term each year. Offered summer term each year as part of IBI program. Three semester hours.

  • ECON 373: Stewardship of Resources Living and Learning Community I

    The first semester of a year-long program that will examine the practice of caring for one’s God-given resources through a variety of living and learning opportunities experienced within the context of intentional community. Students are expected to develop a greater understanding of the overall concept of stewardship and the proper care that is to be given to all of one’s resources (spiritual, financial, mental, physical, natural and communal) in a way that honors God and honors God’s creation. Students are expected to engage in multiple active learning experiences outside of the classroom. Prerequisites: Must apply and be accepted to the program through Residence Life. Offered fall term even years. Two semester hours.

  • ECON 374: Stewardship of Resources Living and Learning Community II

    The second semester of a year-long program that will examine the practice of caring for one’s God-given resources through a variety of living and learning opportunities experienced within the context of intentional community. Students are expected to develop a greater understanding of the overall concept of stewardship and the proper care that is to be given to all of one’s resources (spiritual, financial, mental, physical, natural and communal) in a way that honors God and honors God’s creation. Students are expected to engage in multiple active learning experiences outside of the classroom. Prerequisites: ECON 373. Offered spring term odd years. Two semester hours.

  • ECON 401: Advanced Topics in Corporate Finance

    A study of topics beyond the scope of Economics 301. Topics covered include capital markets, investment banking, long-term financing through debt, leasing, and stock issuance, dividend policy, convertibles, warrants, derivatives, growth through mergers and acquisitions, and international financial management. The course makes use of in-class problem solving, case assignments, classroom discussion, as well as classroom and on-site visits. Prerequisite: ECON 301. Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours.

  • ECON 402: Econometrics

    A survey of mathematical modeling based on economic theory. Topics in the course include the identification of variables, development and testing of hypotheses for single- and multi-equation systems. Three semester hours. Prerequisites: ECON 202 and MATH 213 or 314. Offered spring term even years.

  • ECON 403: Money, Banking and Monetary Theory

    A study of the monetary system and theory along with a survey of the commercial banking system of the United States. Banking principles are analyzed, and banking institutions are studied to observe the application of principles. Prerequisite: ECON 202. Offered fall term odd years. Three semester hours.

  • ECON 460: History of Economic Thought

    A study of the development of economics as a social science. Attention is given to the social and political context that has defined rules for economic behavior in the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. Prerequisite: ECON 201 and 202. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

  • ECON 470: Business Strategy

    An integrated study of the functional areas of finance, marketing, and management with concentration on case analysis, readings, and computer simulations. Prerequisites: BADM 315 and 361 and ECON 301. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

  • ECON 491: Internship

    A practicum experience in which students work in a professional setting using knowledge from economics courses. Prerequisite: consent of major professor. Offered every term. One to six semester hours.

  • ECON 495: Seminar

    A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from semester to semester. One to three semester hours.