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Course Descriptions

  • EDUC 570: Secondary Physical Education and Physical Wellness Methods

    A course designed to prepare students to teach physical education and wellness in secondary schools. This course will include practical presentation of classroom management, developmentally appropriate skill and lifetime sport development, assessment techniques, and lesson preparation and presentation. Field experience with written evaluation is included in this course. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours.

  • EDUC 571: Early Childhood and Elementary Foundations

    A study of historical, philosophical, and theoretical foundations of early childhood and elementary education with an introduction to curriculum planning and an emphasis on major trends and issues in early childhood and elementary education. Includes guidance and classroom management. Offered fall and summer terms. Three semester hours.

  • EDUC 572: Advanced Child Guidance

    A study of skills and techniques for handling behavioral and disciplinary issues of young children. Candidates create and design creative experiences and activities for children in the setting of their internship. Emphasis is on providing a developmentally appropriate environment that fosters social/emotional development. Offered fall term. Three semester hours.

  • EDUC 573: Advanced Child Development & Learning

    An interdisciplinary study of the physical, cognitive, social, and personality development of the child from birth through adolescence. Major theories of learning including the constructivist model are covered. Implications of child development for classroom teaching are addressed. Three semester hours. Offered summer term each year.

  • EDUC 575: Advanced Early Childhood Administration

    A discussion of the philosophy, organization, and components of developmentally appropriate programs for children and their families. Administration, environmental aspects, parent and community involvement, staff supervision, evaluation, development, and budget of programs are examined. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours.

  • EDUC 575M: Advanced Early Childhood Administration

    A discussion of the philosophy, organization, and components of developmentally appropriate programs for children and their families. Administration, environmental aspects, parent and community involvement, staff supervision, evaluation, development, and budget of programs are examined. Offered as needed. Three semester hours.

  • EDUC 576A: Early Childhood and Elementary Curriculum and Methods

    This course is designed to prepare the K-5 candidate with a specific focus on the educational needs of students in the cognitive realms of scientific, social, mathematical, and language learning. The focus is on instruction, lesson planning and implementing learning environments relating to the Tennessee Educator Acceleration Model (TEAM). Candidates learn how to transform standards into learning objectives and assess learning through formative and summative assessments. Candidates must plan an upper elementary unit related to students’ interests, diverse needs, and state standards. Emphasis is given to the integration of content areas, especially social studies and the Common Core English/Language Arts (ELA) standards. Includes a review of relevant educational research. Offered summer and fall term. Clinical experience in an upper elementary classroom included in fall term. Three semester hours.

  • EDUC 577: Language Arts and Reading

    A study of the current methods and strategies for teaching language arts and reading, including such topics as language development, phonological awareness, word recognition, whole language, comprehension, vocabulary development, writing, spelling, and assessment. Offered summer and fall terms. Three semester hours.

  • EDUC 579: Education of Exceptional Students in Early Childhood and Elementary Settings

    A study of early childhood and elementary special education areas: assessment; family participation; IEPs/IFSPs; service delivery models; general curriculum; and intervention strategies. Also includes a study of diversity and its implications for teaching and learning. Offered as needed. Three semester hours.

  • EDUC 581: State Line Wind Symphony

    Performance with the State Line Wind Symphony. Audition required. Offered spring and summer terms. One semester hour.

  • EDUC 582: Characteristics of Exceptional Children

    A study of all aspects of exceptional children including reading, arithmetic, auditory, visual, and perceptual motor problems as well as characteristics of children who are gifted. The student is introduced to assessment using diagnostic tests to determine if special services are needed to assist the children in achieving. Principles and best practices in classroom management are also studied. An experiential approach is used so that critical thinking skills may aid in decision-making. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours.

  • EDUC 583: Methods of Instruction in Special Education

    Educational procedures and materials for teaching exceptional children who are learning disabled, mentally retarded, emotionally disturbed, physically handicapped, gifted, and socially maladjusted with an emphasis on learning. Techniques discussed include behavior modification, perceptual remediation, cognitive and intellectual development, and the use of various apparati helpful to exceptional children. An additional two clock hours per week may be required for observation and experience in the schools. Offered occasionally. Four semester hours.

  • EDUC 590: Directed Studies

    Research related to a specific educational problem under the direct supervision of an instructor. Offered as needed. One to six semester hours.

  • EDUC 592: Grant Writing

    An overview of the grant writing process including how to research grant opportunities and how to determine those most appropriate for their own situations. Students write grant proposals and follow-up reports, tailoring proposals to specific organizations. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours.

  • EDUC 595: Contemporary Issues

    A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from semester to semester. An elective in licensed teacher programs. Offered occasionally. One to three semester hours.

  • EDUC 621: Assessment and Evaluation

    A focus on the strategies for the assessment and evaluation of student and teacher performance, including construction of teacher-made tests and alternate approaches. Candidates also learn how to read and interpret standardized test scores for student diagnosis and individualization of instruction. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

  • EDUC 621M: Assessment and Evaluation

    A focus on the strategies for the assessment and evaluation of student and teacher performance, including construction of teacher-made tests and alternate approaches. Candidates also learn how to read and interpret standardized test scores for student diagnosis and individualization of instruction. Offered as needed. Three semester hours.

  • EDUC 622: Classroom Management

    A study of positive child guidance and effective classroom management strategies. Emphasis is on creating safe, caring classrooms through organizing and managing effectively. Topics include psychosocial, physical, instructional, organizational, procedural, and behavior dimensions of classroom management. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours.

  • EDUC 623M: Research-Based Teaching Strategies

    A study of the types of instructional strategies that effectively improve student achievement. Topics may include identifying similarities and differences, summarizing and note taking, reinforcing effort and providing recognition, homework and practice, representing knowledge, learning groups, setting objectives and providing feedback, generating and testing hypotheses, and cues, questions and advance organizers. Classroom implementation of the strategies will be included in the discussion. Offered as needed. Three semester hours.

  • EDUC 626: Mentorship

    A study of the mentoring process. Areas of study include classroom and school environments that effectively nurture mentors and protégées; the recruitment, selection, and training of mentors; matching mentors and protégées; and evaluating the results of mentoring. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours.

  • EDUC 631: Cultural Diversity and Education

    An in-depth study of the ways in which ethnicity and race, age, gender, language, social class, geography, religion and other cultural factors influence teaching and student achievement. Guidelines for culturally responsive curriculum and teaching. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours.

  • EDUC 641: Advanced Parent Education and Involvement

    A review of the research on the relationship between family involvement and school achievement; the reasons for developing school, family, and community partnerships; roles and options for parents and families who want to be involved in schools; methods for determining parents’ needs and interests; selecting and implementing different types of parent involvement; and the effectiveness of current national and school-level parent education and involvement programs. Offered once a year. Three semester hours.

  • EDUC 641M: Advanced Parent Education and Involvement

    A review of the research on the relationship between family involvement and school achievement; the reasons for developing school, family, and community partnerships; roles and options for parents and families who want to be involved in schools; methods for determining parents’ needs and interests; selecting and implementing different types of parent involvement; and the effectiveness of current national and school-level parent education and involvement programs. Offered once a year. Three semester hours.

  • EDUC 662: School Organization and Law

    A study of the organization and structure of the school including central office activities, special services, supervision, and school level administration. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours.

  • EDUC 662M: School Organization and Law

    A study of the organization and structure of the school including central office activities, special services, supervision, and school level administration. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours.

  • EDUC 670M: Professional Teacher Standards

    A course preparing teachers to meet professional standards established by the National Board of Professional Teaching Standards, paralleling the documentation process required for National Board Certification. This course reviews the five areas required for National Board Certification: 1) Teachers are committed to students and their learning; 2) Teachers know the subjects they teach and how to teach those subjects to students; 3) Teachers are responsible for managing and monitoring student learning; 4) Teachers think systematically about their practice and learn from experience; and 5) Teachers are members of learning communities. Students are coached through an extensive series of performance-based assessments. A portfolio is required for this course. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours.

  • ENGL 164: Fiction of C.S. Lewis

    A close look at Lewis’s fictional works, with some reference to his other writings. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

  • ENGL 275: Writing for the Stage and Screen

    A studio course in writing for film or for the theatre. Students learn the basics principles of dramatic writing. Students study examples of dramatic writing, compose a critical paper on the film or stage play of their choice, and create an original short script. This course fulfills the screenwriting credit that is prerequisite for all production courses in the film program, and film students may develop scripts that can be produced in subsequent filmmaking courses. The course is offered as an elective for theatre and creative writing students. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

  • ENGL 290: Independent Study

    Individual study to enable the student either to study material not in the curriculum or to facilitate an individualized approach in a field not covered in a single course. Not open to freshmen. One to three semester hours.

  • ENGL 295: Seminar

    A seminar designed to promote discussion, research, and writing in areas not included in the regular course offerings. Topics vary from semester to semester. One to three semester hours.

  • ENGL 304: Survey of American Literature, 19th Century

    A study of the development of American literature with special attention to the writings of the major authors. Offered fall term even years. Three semester hours.

  • ENGL 305: Survey of American Literature, 20th century

    A study of the major authors of the twentieth century with special attention to modernism. Readings include novels, short fiction, drama, and poetry. Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours.

  • ENGL 311: History and Grammar of the English Language

    A team-taught study of the development of English and its contemporary usage. This course will provide an overview of the history of English from its Indo-European roots to contemporary English, examine the development of modern English grammar, and explore current usage. Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours.

  • ENGL 312: Introduction to Linguistics

    A study of the basic principles of linguistic analysis as specifically applied to the English language. Offered fall term every third year. Three semester hours.

  • ENGL 324: Creative Writing

    Workshop experience in creative writing as well as selected genre readings. Prerequisites: COMP 111 and 211 (or equivalent) and approval of the instructor. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

  • ENGL 335: Editing and Style

    A survey of the fundamentals of editing, style, layout, and production in various media formats. Lab work with The Stampede is required. Cross listed as COMM 335. Prerequisite: COMM 205 or consent of instructor. Offered fall term 2016; then offered fall term, odd years. Three semester hours.

  • ENGL 350: Shakespeare

    A study of Shakespeare’s major tragedies and comedies along with a selection of the histories and romances. This course will examine the historical background of the plays and also consider their enduring popularity. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

  • ENGL 354: Children's Literature

    A study of children’s literature designed to acquaint the student with the literary contributions suitable for elementary grades. Not applicable towards an English major. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

  • ENGL 354B: Children's Literature

    A study of children’s literature designed to acquaint the student with the literary contributions suitable for elementary grades. Not applicable towards an English major. Offered second term. Three semester hours

  • ENGL 360: Introduction to Literary Theory and Criticism

    A survey of the theory and practice of literary criticism, designed to provide knowledge of the underpinnings of the discipline and a primary conversance with the major approaches. Cross listed as PHIL 360. Offered fall term even years. Three semester hours.

  • ENGL 361: From Blake to Brontё: Romanticism and its Legacy

    A survey of English literature from the late 18th to mid-19th centuries, featuring the major Romantic poets and their contemporaries. Writers such as William Blake, William Wordsworth, John Keats, Emily Brontё, and Christina Rossetti will be considered in their dynamic and dramatic national, historical, and thematic contexts. Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours.

  • ENGL 362: African-American Narrative Literature

    A study of autobiographical and fictional narratives by African-American writers with emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and attention to historical context and current critical issues. This course fulfills the ethnic studies course requirement in the general education core. Offered fall term odd years. Three semester hours.

  • ENGL 363: Arthurian Legends

    An examination of a variety of Arthurian stories across a range of periods from the Middle Ages to the present day. This study explores the adaptability and continuing popularity of this story in diverse cultural contexts; readings will come from medieval romance, Victorian poetry, and contemporary novels and will be supplemented with artwork and film. Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours.

  • ENGL 365: Literature by Women

    How do women writers from a wealth of cultural backgrounds navigate issues of labor, creativity, and identity throughout the 19th and 20th centuries? The course grapples with this question while exploring the literary accomplishments of such writers as Jane Austen, Willa Cather, Virginia Woolf, Zora Neale Hurston, Elizabeth Bowen, Sui Sin Far, Elizabeth Bishop, and Alice Walker. Offered fall term even years. Three semester hours.

  • ENGL 370: Literature and the Environment

    A study of the relationship between American literature and the environment. The course focuses on canonical American texts, such as those by Thoreau and Emerson, as well as more specifically environmental texts by Muir, Leopold, and Carson. Special attention is given to environmental writing of Appalachia, including works by Fred Chappell and Hubert Skidmore. All the texts will be placed in dialogue with current literary theory, including ecocriticism and ecofeminism, and current Christian thinkers in the field. Offered fall semesters even years. Three semester hours.

  • ENGL 375: World Literature

    A study of literature from non-Western traditions, ranging from the Caribbean to Japan, with focus on postcolonial and transnational perspectives. This course fulfills the ethnic studies course requirement in the general education core. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

  • ENGL 380: Short Story

    A chronological study of the genre of the shortstory during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries with emphasis on American, British, and post-colonial stories. Offered fall term odd years. Three semester hours.

  • ENGL 411: Modern and Contemporary Poetry and Drama

    A study of significant works of poetry and drama in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries., including American, English, and post-colonial writers. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

  • ENGL 414: British Fiction of the Twentieth Century

    A study of major British writers in the Twentieth Century, such as A. S. Byatt, Joseph Conrad, E. M. Forster, Graham Greene, James Joyce, D. H. Lawrence, Katherine Mansfield, Iris Murdoch, and Virginia Woolf. Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours.

  • ENGL 430: Medieval Literature

    A study of English literature of the Middle Ages, beginning with Beowulf and concluding with Malory’s Le Morte d’Arthur. Readings will cover major authors and genres with selections from Chaucer, Gower, Langland, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and The Book of Margery Kempe and will provide historical context for these selections. Offered fall term odd years. Three semester hours.