Rise Above – Undergraduate Research

Apply what you learn in the classroom on campus and beyond through undergraduate research. Explore a topic related to your career interest or graduate school. Build skills and experience to strengthen your résumé, to land competitive jobs, or to get into a competitive graduate school. Develop critical-thinking skills and increase your interaction and learning from your professors with one-on-one faculty-mentored research projects.

Milligan’s RISE Above program provides opportunities for students to participate in experiences of faculty-mentored research and creative expression. Many of our students conduct research, perform on stage, exhibit original artwork, present at conferences, and publish written works. It all starts with your burning question — what interests you? The topics are limitless. Our students have studied everything from the effects of exercise on a McDonald’s diet to video game music as an art form. They have completed research experiences with renowned experts in medicine and behavioral science and presented posters and papers on Capitol Hill and at national conferences.

As part of Milligan’s Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP), undergraduate students are encouraged to participate in at least one extensive learning project beyond the classroom before you graduate. Build on your classroom education and explore a topic of real interest to you.

Value. Examine. Create. Share.

RISE Above is designed to move traditional undergraduate students progressively through four major learning principles. In the freshman and sophomore years, building on courses already in place, RISE Above will focus on strengthening connections between knowledge and skill and promoting the inherent value of participating in research. In the junior and senior years, students will be invited to work on independent research projects, mentored by Milligan professors, and present their findings in a public forum.

Benefits of Undergraduate Research

The benefits of undergraduate research activities are well-documented.

  • Students who participate can expect academic and cognitive gains as well as enhanced career development and preparation for graduate school.
  • Faculty-mentors reap intrinsic benefits—finding personal and professional satisfaction in modeling life-long learning through relationships with students—and they benefit from the professional development that can come from such activities.
  • Institutions benefit from the activities and excitement that come to a campus when faculty and students collaborate on research.




Research Exploration Events

Undergraduate Research Informational Meeting @ Welshimer Room
Oct 20 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm
Evening Faculty Lecture @ Hyder Auditorium
Oct 27 @ 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
David Campbell Associate Professor of Economics

David Campbell
Associate Professor of Economics

Dr. Campbell’s lecture is titled: “Interstate Migration in Response to Social Liberalizations: Same Sex Unions and Marijuana”

Undergraduate Research Informational Meeting @ Welshimer Room
Nov 17 @ 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Flier for bulletin boards (fall)

3rd Annual Rise Above Research Conference @ Derthick
Apr 19 @ 2:00 pm – 8:00 pm

This is conference is a culminating event for students who have been engaged in mentored undergraduate research at Milligan College. Presentations will showcase the scholarly and creative research from all disciplines and majors. Former and current 499 students are encouraged to attend and present. Students not enrolled in 499 are welcome to present faculty-sponsored research projects as well. Poster and oral presentation options will be available.


Evening Faculty Lecture @ Hyder Auditorium
Apr 19 @ 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm
Professor of Humanities, History and German

Professor of Humanities, History and German

Dr. Thomas will share the results of his research on Pastor Hermann Maas who helped rescue German Jews in WWII. This lecture will be the keynote lecture at the end of the Rise Above Undergraduate Research Conference.

Mentored Research

In recognition of the many benefits of undergraduate research, the college implemented a quality enhancement program in 2012 that seeks to significantly increase the number of students who participate in undergraduate research.

Students seeking to pursue undergraduate research for credit will identify a faculty mentor who will support and facilitate the research initiative, including the completion of one or more courses in which research is the focus. These “RISE” courses are available across the college’s academic offerings. “Rise” courses are available in all academic disciplines. Courses are numbered 499A, 499B, and 499C.

This faculty-mentored set of independent research courses will allow for an in-depth study of a specific question relevant to the discipline. At the successful conclusion of three credit-hours-499A, B, and C- students will have submitted a substantive paper with bibliography and will have publicly presented their findings.

The three 499 courses are described below:


Students enrolled in 499A are considered to be in the “formative” stage of their research project. Students should enroll in 499A if they are in the early stages of forming their project ideas and when considerable work still needs to be done before new knowledge or creative works can be started.

Depending on the discipline, students may do any of the following kinds of activities:

  • find and read relevant literature
  • develop an annotated bibliography
  • identify key methods, theories, or models to guide the project
  • develop foundational research skills
  • attend research planning meetings
  • write a research proposal
  • shadow or assist more advanced researchers, etc.


Students enrolled in 499B are considered to be in the “productive” stage of their research project. Students should enroll in 499B if their project idea is well-formed and the student has the necessary background information and skills to begin the hard work of carrying out their planned project.

Depending on the discipline, students may do any of the following kinds of activities:

  • collect data
  • write
  • create
  • initiate contacts with participants/agencies
  • get IRB approval
  • organize the data
  • establish reliability and validity of methods, etc.


Students enrolled in 499C are considered to be in the “culminating” stage of their research project. Students should enroll in 499C if their project is largely done and ready for final presentation.

Depending on the discipline, students may do any of the following kinds of activities:

  • analyze data
  • write conclusions
  • finalize project/paper
  • submit for conference
  • prepare presentation
  • attend and present at a conference
  • submit for publication, etc.

Regardless of the discipline, students enrolled in 499C are expected to have a written paper with bibliography either as their final product or as an accompanying description of their project. Students in 499C are also required to make their project public through a presentation at an appropriate public venue.

This may be accomplished in any of the following ways: giving an oral or poster presentation at a conference, giving a gallery talk, or putting on a performance. Students are encouraged to present at Milligan’s annual RISE Above Research Conference to meet this requirement.

Research Conferences & Journals

Local Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Research Conferences


Milligan College
April 19, 2016 (Abstracts due April 1, 2016)

Students at Milligan will have a chance to present their research to an audience of their peers and faculty. All 499C students are encouraged to present even if they have already presented elsewhere and students not enrolled in 499C are welcome to present faculty-sponsored research projects. Poster and oral presentation options will be available. More information about registering to come.


The University of Tennessee
October 30, 2015 (Abstracts due Sept 18, 2015)

Any undergraduate student enrolled in an accredited, not-for-profit Tennessee college, university, or community college who has completed a mentored research, service learning project, or a study abroad experience is eligible to present at TELS. The event is open to anyone to register and attend. This includes other undergraduate students, graduate students, faculty, and staff from Tennessee or outside Tennessee. TELS is an interdisciplinary symposium. One of its most positive aspects is the cross-platform exposure to research, creative activity, service learning, or study abroad experiences centered on themes of interest. To highlight the interdisciplinary focus, each oral and poster session will be organized around these themes: Culture, Heritage & the Creative Economy, Business & Enterprise, Governance & Society, Sustainability, Agriculture & the Environment, Improving Lives and Communities, Logic and Reasoning, and Science, Technology & Society.


The University of Tennessee
February 21, 2015 (Abstracts due November 14, 2015)

The 2015 Undergraduate Classics Conference will pertain to a wide variety of topics concerning the classical world, with paper sessions being divided by theme based on the papers accepted. Abstracts will be considered from any discipline within classical studies (archaeology, history, philology, etc.) or a related field. Examples range from an analysis of the rhetoric of a Demosthenic speech to a report of the findings of a current excavation to a commentary on the hybridization of style in Pompeian wall painting (this is not an exhaustive list).


Presented by Johnson University
April 1-2, 2016

The Stone-Campbell Journal is designed for students, scholars, and ministers of the Stone-Campbell Restoration Movement who think deeply about the Bible, theology, and issues related to our common heritage. The 15th annual SCJ conference will be hosted by Johnson University on April 1-2, 2016. Presentations by students are welcome.

39th Annual Appalachian Studies Conference

Shepherd University, Shepherdstown, West Virginia
March 18-20, 2016

Download a conference flyer.

This year’s theme is “Voices from the Misty Mountains: Diversity and Unity, a New Appalachia.” We especially invite presentations that focus on the changing face of the region; the diverse groups that constitute who we are; the educational and community institutions that either accommodate or react to the changes that challenge us and call for our best selves; and the grass-roots efforts to protect the very mountains that are the principal source of our commonality and identity.


University of North Carolina at Asheville
April 7-9, 2016

The mission of the National Conference on Undergraduate Research (NCUR) is to promote undergraduate research scholarship and creative activity done in partnership with faculty or other mentors as a vital component of higher education.

Visit the conference website for submission deadlines and other important dates.


East Tennessee State University
April 6-7, 2016 (Abstracts due March 2)

The ETSU Appalachian Student Research Forum is an annual event in which undergraduate, graduate and medical students as well as post-doctoral fellows and medical residents present their research in a formal setting. The Forum is open to all colleges and universities within the Appalachian region. Participation is free!

22nd Annual Blue Ridge Undergraduate Research Conference

King University
March 27, 2015

Undergraduate students from institutions throughout the Southern Appalachian region will be chosen to present their research projects in a comfortable setting surrounded by other researchers and faculty. This year’s conference will be a one day event, with the paper sessions starting in the early afternoon. After the paper sessions have finished there will be a poster session, concluding with a reception for all participants and faculty.

Additional conferences can be found at the Council on Undergraduate Research.

Undergraduate Research Journals

Undergraduate Research Commons

The Undergraduate Research Commons is a discovery portal showcasing over 700 outstanding undergraduate research publications—and counting. This collection of exemplary undergraduate work includes award-winning capstone projects, faculty-mentored research, and peer-reviewed scholarship from hundreds of undergraduate institutions. Undergraduate authors can also see which peer-reviewed journals and conferences are currently open for submissions.

Papers and Pubs

Papers and Pub(lication)s is an open access peer reviewed online and print journal of undergraduate research. Papers and Pubs promotes student learning by disseminating undergraduate research and creative works that make an intellectual or creative contribution to the discipline or to applied practice.

International Journal of Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities

This journal welcomes the submission of research articles, fiction, poetry, photography, video, and other creative works from all academic disciplines. Each submission must be the original work of at least one undergraduate student with at least one faculty mentor, although the work may be submitted shortly after the student(s) has graduated.

National Undergraduate Research Clearinghouse

This is an online journal devoted to publishing empirical research from any scientific discipline. Manuscripts are NOT peer-reviewed but must be sponsored by a faculty member. This is a good place to publish a study temporarily while waiting for your study to be published in discipline-specific or more prestigious journals. Published articles can be removed and copyrights transferred to another journal at any time.

The Stone-Campbell Journal (SCJ)

The SCJ is designed for students, scholars, and ministers of the Stone-Campbell Restoration Movement who think deeply about the Bible, theology, and issues related to our common heritage. SCJ provides a scholarly platform for biblical interpretation, history, theology, philosophy, apologetics, and cultural criticism for those who value the perspective of the Stone-Campbell Restoration Movement and who endeavor to advance its distinctive principles today.


Discussions is the undergraduate research journal of Case Western Reserve University. The journal is peer-reviewed and run by students. Discussions accepts research papers written by current undergraduate students from accredited colleges and universities around the globe. The research can be on any topic, not limited to science or engineering. A student may submit a paper from a class, as long as his/her work presents a new and innovative idea.

Visit the Council on Undergraduate Research website to find more undergraduate research journals.