fbpx

Emergency Alert

COVID-19 (CORONAVIRUS) UPDATES »

X
Menu

Course Descriptions

  • NURS 499A: Mentored Research

    A faculty-mentored research course in which students craft a research proposal, prepare a literature review, and outline the methods by which they plan to conduct research. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

  • NURS 499B: Mentored Research

    A faculty-mentored research course in which students complete their research in a manner consistent with practices in their discipline and submit a written draft of their findings to their mentor. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

  • NURS 499C: Mentored Research

    A faculty-mentored research course in which students revise their research and present their findings publicly. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

  • OT 501: Diagnostic Considerations for Occupational Therapy

    A review of major pathophysiological and psychosocial conditions including clinical descriptions, etiology, routine diagnostic procedures, progression of the condition, medical management, prognosis and outcomes. From an occupational performance perspective, information is presented in terms of how the condition might affect and influence sensorimotor, cognitive, psychosocial, self-care, productivity, and leisure functioning. A clinical team approach and legal issues of mental health are presented. Offered fall term each year. Four semester hours.

  • OT 510: Christ and Calling in Health Care

    A seminar class designed to help students integrate their faith into health service provision and administration. Issues addressed include exploration of Christ as a healer, exploration of self and one’s calling, scientific study of the impact of religion on health care, appropriate avenues of ministry in health care, and how to surmount obstacles to compassion in American health care culture. Offered fall term each year. One semester hour.

  • OT 531: Musculoskeletal Anatomy

    A regional study of human muscular and skeletal anatomy with particular concentration on the back and upper extremity. Course includes cadaver dissection, demonstration, and lecture. This course is available to undergraduate students with senior status. Undergraduate prerequisites: senior status, BIOL 250 and 251 , and consent of the instructor. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

  • OT 532: Functional Neuroanatomy

    A presentation of human neuroanatomy with implications for abnormality and subsequent therapy treatment. The course includes the study of human nervous system specimens in a laboratory setting. This course is available to undergraduate students with senior status. Undergraduate prerequisites: senior status, BIOL 250, and consent of the instructor. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours. This course does not fulfill the science laboratory requirement of the undergraduate GER.

  • OT 535: Kinesiology – Human Movement

    A study of the principles of human movement including analysis of biomechanics, joint structure and function, muscle physiology, and musculoskeletal function. An introduction is given to methods to improve movement quality in functional performance. Prerequisites: OT 501 and 531 or consent of the instructor. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

  • OT 560: Foundation of Occupations

    Occupation is the foundation of our profession. In this course students will begin to learn the significance of occupation in the history and current practice of the profession of occupational therapy. Other topics that will be discussed with an occupation-based focus include theory development and use in practice, cultural influences, activity analysis, the therapeutic relationship, evidence based practice and the OT Practice Framework. The development of professional writing skills is an integral component of this course. Offered fall term each year. Four semester hours.

  • OT 580: Research Design and Methods in Occupational Therapy I

    An introduction to research design with concentration on occupational therapy literature and skill development in review of research literature, formulation of problem statements, research design, and critical analysis of published research. Research methodology is reviewed with concentration on recognizing and dealing with threats to methodological validity and reliability. Students identify research interests with occupational therapy applications or focus. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

  • OT 605: Lifespan Occupational Development

    The study of typical occupational development of infants through young adulthood with concentration upon the functional roles typical for children and adults within a variety of cultural settings, i.e. self-care, play, school, family, self-care, care of others, work, leisure, friend relationships, and community interactions. Activities and tasks reflective of role functioning are analyzed. Three semester hours.

  • OT 610: Play/Leisure

    The exploration of play/leisure as a primary performance area of occupational therapy. Laboratory experience in play/leisure skills evaluation and training for the physically, mentally, and cognitively disabled. This course emphasizes evaluation and training with a life-span perspective. Strategies that promote adaptation to disabilities and that increase role independence include: using play/leisure activities in therapeutic intervention, adapting media and play/leisure tasks to specific disabling conditions. Offered spring term each year. Two semester hours.

  • OT 615: Work Programs in Occupational Therapy: Principles and Practice

    Major vocational theories and occupational therapy frames of references will be explored. The assessment and intervention of work dysfunction related to physical, cognitive, and mental impairments are addressed. Assessment and intervention skills include: prevocational, job analysis, work/functional capacity, and ergonomics. Legal issues related to the Americans with Disabilities Act, Individual with Disabilities Education Act, workers’ compensation, and Social Security Disability are included. Opportunities for occupational therapists to serve as consultants to various industries are explored. Prerequisites: OT 501, 531 and 535 or consent of the instructor. Offered fall term each year. Two semester hours.

  • OT 620: Activities of Daily Living

    Laboratory experience in the evaluation, intervention, and training of basic and instrumental activities of daily living for the physically, mentally, and cognitively disabled. This course focuses on a range of implementation strategies including environmental adaptation, use and design of adaptive equipment, restructuring cognitive complexity, and training caregivers to assist individuals in regaining functional independence in meaningful activities. Prerequisites: OT 501, 531, 532, 535 and 560 or consent of the instructor. Offered fall term each year. Two semester hours.

  • OT 631: Psychosocial Theory and Practice

    The study and application of psychosocial components of occupational therapy practice in all areas of practice with a focus on mental health diagnoses and an emphasis on the development of the therapeutic relationship. Psychosocial theories and occupational theories such as the Model of Human Occupation along with related intervention strategies are addressed through coursework and community service learning experiences. Prerequisites: OT 501 and 532 or consent of the instructor. Offered fall term each year. Five semester hours.

  • OT 632: Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics

    A developmental approach to principles of occupational therapy with infants and children, including evaluation, treatment planning, treatment techniques, discharge planning, and working with care givers. Prerequisites: OT 501 and 531 or consent of the instructor. Offered spring term each year. Five semester hours.

  • OT 643: Orthopedic Dysfunction Theory and Practice

    A holistic approach to the theory and practice of occupational therapy with adults, including evaluation, intervention planning, intervention techniques, and discontinuation of services. Interaction with caregivers and team members will be discussed. Concentration will be placed on general orthopedic conditions, upper extremity dysfunction, and splinting skills. Prerequisites: OT 501, 531, 532 and 535 or consent of the instructor. Offered fall term each year. Four semester hours.

  • OT 644: Neurological Dysfunction Theory and Practice

    A holistic approach to the theory and practice of occupational therapy with adults, including evaluation, intervention planning, intervention techniques, and discontinuation of services. Interaction with caregivers and team members will be discussed. Concentration will be placed on neurological conditions. Prerequisites: OT 501, 531, 532, 535 and 643 or consent of the instructor. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

  • OT 651: Group Process

    A presentation of group theory and group dynamics. The instruction in basic group skills includes selecting a theory base, designing groups, writing group protocols, analyzing group activities, implementing specific group techniques, and evaluating progress of group members. Prerequisite: OT 631 or consent of the instructor. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

  • OT 652: Occupational Therapy in Geriatrics

    A developmental approach to the principles of occupational therapy for the older adult including typical occupational development, evaluation, intervention planning, intervention techniques, discharge planning, and working with care providers. Prerequisites: OT 501, 605, 531, 532, and 535 or consent of the instructor. Offered spring term each year. Two semester hours.

  • OT 680: Research Design and Methods in Occupational Therapy II

    A continuation of OT 580 with an emphasis on sampling techniques, survey construction, grant writing, and advanced critique and analysis of published research. The course also includes a practical review of basic data analysis techniques used in qualitative and quantitative research formats. Prerequisite: OT 580. Offered spring term each year. Two semester hours

  • OT 691A: Fieldwork Level IA

    Introductory fieldwork level I experiences in the area of pediatric occupational therapy settings under the supervision of clinicians. Offered spring term each year. One semester hour.

  • OT 691B: Fieldwork Level IB

    Introductory fieldwork level I experiences in the area of psychosocial occupational therapy settings under the supervision of clinicians. Offered fall term each year. One semester hour.

  • OT 691C: Fieldwork Level IC

    Introductory fieldwork level I experience in the area of physical dysfunction occupational therapy settings under the supervision of clinicians. Offered spring term each year. One credit hour.

  • OT 710: Leading and Managing Occupational Therapy Services

    The study of the occupational therapist’s role in service management and the health care system. Professional values, attitudes, ethics, and standards are emphasized. The study involves skill development in consultation, continuous quality improvement, program evaluation, strategic planning, marketing, and budgeting. Trends in health care and third-party reimbursement are examined. Prerequisites: OT 560, 580, 615, 631, 632, 643 and 680 or consent of the instructor. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

  • OT 740: Professional Development Seminar

    Seminar that prepares students for Level II Fieldwork, the NBCOT examination, entry level occupational therapy positions and ongoing professional development. Students integrate academic knowledge, personal interests, educational experiences and reflective thinking skills to develop a program of learning activities to prepare them for their future responsibilities and opportunities. An independent O.T. Expo capstone project is designed and developed by each student. Prerequisites: OT 631, 632, 643, 691 A, B and 695 A, B or consent of the instructor. Offered spring term each year. Two semester hours.

  • OT 750: Specialization Elective

    A course directed toward students’ exposure to clinical areas of practice of their own choosing. Offered fall and spring terms each year. Prerequisites: OT 615, 631, 632, and 643 or consent of the instructor. Two semester hours.

  • OT 751: Specialization Elective

    A course directed toward students’ exposure to clinical areas of practice of their own choosing. Offered fall and spring terms each year. Prerequisites: OT 615, 631, 632, and 643 or consent of the instructor. Two semester hours.

  • OT 780A: Directed Research

    Group research project or individual research project supervised by appropriate faculty. Students will participate in two hours of directed research during the spring semester of their first year (780A). During the fall semester of their second year, students will take two hours of directed research for data collection or project development (780B). Students in the spring semester of their second year will take one hour of directed research in order to defend their research or present their project (780C). 780A and B – two semester hours each; 780C – one semester hour.

  • OT 780B: Directed Research

    Group research project or individual research project supervised by appropriate faculty. Students will participate in two hours of directed research during the spring semester of their first year (780A). During the fall semester of their second year, students will take two hours of directed research for data collection or project development (780B). Students in the spring semester of their second year will take one hour of directed research in order to defend their research or present their project (780C). 780A and B – two semester hours each; 780C – one semester hour.

  • OT 780C: Directed Research

    Group research project or individual research project supervised by appropriate faculty. Students will participate in two hours of directed research during the spring semester of their first year (780A). During the fall semester of their second year, students will take two hours of directed research for data collection or project development (780B). Students in the spring semester of their second year will take one hour of directed research in order to defend their research or present their project (780C). 780A and B – two semester hours each; 780C – one semester hour.

  • OT 791A: Fieldwork Level IIA

    A full-time supervised clinical experience designed to develop entry-level professional skills, consisting of a three-month full-time affiliation in a selected treatment setting. Offered every term. Five semester hours.

  • OT 791B: Fieldwork Level IIB

    A full-time supervised clinical experience designed to develop entry-level professional skills, consisting of a three-month full-time affiliation in a selected treatment setting. Offered every term. Five semester hours.

  • OT 791C: Fieldwork Level IIC (optional)

    A full-time supervised clinical experience in a specialized area. A minimum of six weeks duration is required. Offered every term. Three to five semester hours.

  • PHIL 151: Logic

    A study of the principles of correct reasoning. The course consists of a survey of the basic concepts of logic, the uses and abuses of language in everyday discourse, the concepts of inductive and deductive reasoning, and effective application of those concepts in the development and analysis of arguments in a wide variety of fields. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

  • PHIL 301: How to Live Well: Ancient Philosophy and Enduring Questions

    An introduction to the ancient philosophical traditions that have shaped and continue to shape the West. Focuses primarily on the works of Plato and Aristotle but also attends to the so-called Pre-Socratics and to some later Hellenistic and Roman philosophers. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours.

  • PHIL 302: Modern Western Philosophy and Its Critics

    An introduction to several modern philosophical traditions that have shaped and continue to shape the West. Focuses not only on important modernist philosophers (such as Descartes, Locke, and Kant), but also their modernist and postmodernist critics. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours.

  • PHIL 321: Ethics

    An introduction to the character of ethical reflection through the study of important philosophical texts and traditions of moral reflection, as well as through contemporary literature and film. Offered fall term alternate years. Three semester hours.

  • PHIL 350: Religions of the World

    An introduction to a wide variety of religious traditions, such as Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, and others. This course fulfills the ethnic studies course requirement in the general education core. Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester hours.

  • PHIL 360: Introduction to Literary Theory and Criticism

    A survey of the theory and practice of literary criticism, designed to provide knowledge of the underpinnings of the discipline and a primary conversance with the major approaches. Cross listed as ENGL 360. Offered fall term even years. Three semester hours.

  • PHIL 450: Advanced Literary Theory

    A study of the major figures and works in the field of literary theory. This course will continue to build upon principles introduced in ENGL 360. Prerequisite: ENGL 360 or permission of instructor. Cross listed as ENGL 450. Offered spring term odd years Three semester hours.

  • PHIL 489: Directed Readings

    A supervised program of readings which provides for study of material not included in the regular course offerings. One to three semester hours.

  • PHIL 490: Directed Studies

    A program of readings and conferences which provides for individualized study. One to three semester hours.

  • PHIL 495: Seminar

    A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from semester to semester. One to three semester hours.

  • PHYS 104: Earth and Space Science

    A study of the structure and mechanical principles of the universe. Recommended for students with backgrounds in high school algebra and science. Not applicable toward a science major except for those pursuing licensure. Offered fall and spring terms. Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week. Four semester hours.

  • PHYS 108: How Things Work

    A non-major science course which investigates the application of basic physics principles to the objects around us. Topics include mechanics, heat, light, sound, and electricity. Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week. Offered occasionally. Four semester hours.

  • PHYS 203: General Physics/Calculus

    A study of the fundamental principles of mechanics and thermodynamics in the first semester and electricity and magnetism, wave motions, sound, light, and modern physics in the second semester. Prerequisite: Mathematics 201 or 211. Offered as a year sequence beginning with the fall term each year. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory weekly. Four semester hours each semester.

  • PHYS 204: General Physics/Calculus

    A study of the fundamental principles of mechanics and thermodynamics in the first semester and electricity and magnetism, wave motions, sound, light, and modern physics in the second semester. Prerequisite: Mathematics 201 or 211. Offered as a year sequence beginning with the fall term each year. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory weekly. Four semester hours each semester.

  • PHYS 311: Wave Phenomena

    An introduction to waves in mechanical, electronic, and optical systems, which teaches students mathematical methods in physics such as complex variables and Fourier analysis. Topics include simple oscillations, resonance, superposition, normal modes, traveling waves, electromagnetic waves, interference, and diffraction. Prerequisites: MATH 212 and PHYS 204 or consent of the instructor. Offered fall term each year. Four semester hours.

  • PHYS 351: Quantum Mechanics

    Analysis of atomic scale systems, including experimental background, solutions of Schrödinger’s equation, quantization of angular momentum, and applications and interpretations. Prerequisite: PHYS 311. Offered spring term each year. Four semester hours.