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Course Descriptions

  • HIST 376: Jefferson to Jackson

    A study in the history of the Early National Period of the United States from 1787 to the 1830s with attention given to the ideas and events which resulted in the emergence of the nation and the development of the frontier. Prerequisites: HIST 209 and 210 or consent of instructor. Offered fall term alternate years. Three semester hours.

  • HIST 377: The Middle Period: 1840-1880

    A survey of the core years of the Nineteenth Century in the United States. At the center of the course of study are the American Civil War, its causes, character, and consequences. Prerequisites: HIST 209 and 210 or consent of instructor. Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester hours.

  • HIST 379: The Gilded Age: 1877-1920

    An examination of the nation in the midst of its industrial development and rapid population growth with specific reference to the impact of that industrialization on U.S. culture, economy, and politics. Prerequisites: HIST 209 and 210 or consent of instructor. Offered fall term alternate years. Three semester hours.

  • HIST 380: United States in the Twentieth Century

    An exploration of U. S. culture and society from World War I to the present. Prerequisites: HIST 209 and 210 or consent of instructor. Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester hours.

  • HIST 401: History and Historians

    A study of the discipline of history and the role played by historians in recording, writing, and interpreting history. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing, twelve hours of history, and consent of instructor. Offered fall term each year. One semester hour.

  • HIST 431: The Stone-Campbell Movement in the North American Context

    A study of the religious movement to restore New Testament Christianity as a basis for Christian union. HIST 432 may satisfy the Church history core elective for the Bible major. Prerequisites: HUMN 101, 102, and 201 or consent of instructor. HIST 431 offered fall term each year; HIST 432 offered spring term each year. Three semester hours each semester.

  • HIST 432: The Stone-Campbell Movement in the North American Context

    A study of the religious movement to restore New Testament Christianity as a basis for Christian union. HIST 432 may satisfy the Church history core elective for the Bible major. Prerequisites: HUMN 101, 102, and 201 or consent of instructor. HIST 431 offered fall term each year; HIST 432 offered spring term each year. Three semester hours each semester.

  • HIST 450: The Holocaust

    A study of the destruction of Europe’s Jews by the Nazis. This study covers the general topic of anti-Semitism, anti-Jewish legislation, the implementation of the Final Solution, and the Jewish response. Offered spring term every three years. Three semester hours.

  • HIST 489: Directed Readings

    A supervised program of readings, which provides for study of material not included in the regular course offerings. One to three semester hours.

  • HIST 490: Directed Studies

    A program of readings and conferences, which provides for individualized study. One to three semester hours.

  • HIST 494: Senior Thesis Seminar

    Required of all history majors in their junior or senior year, the senior thesis seminar provides an opportunity for students to produce a senior thesis reflecting original research. Working in cooperation with fellow history majors and under the joint supervision of the history faculty, students will learn how to choose an appropriate research topic, make use of bibliographic tools, develop an argument, and organize and write a research paper. Students will work on their own projects and serve as peer critics for other projects. Offered spring term each year. One semester hour.

  • HIST 495: Seminar

    A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from semester to semester. One to three semester hours.

  • HIST 499A: Mentored Research

    A faculty-mentored research course in which students craft a research proposal, prepare a literature review, and outline the methods by which they plan to conduct research. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

  • HIST 499B: Mentored Research

    A faculty-mentored research course in which students complete their research in a manner consistent with practices in their discipline and submit a written draft of their findings to their mentor. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

  • HIST 499C: Mentored Research

    A faculty-mentored research course in which students revise their research and present their findings publicly. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

  • HUMN 091: Reading and Study Strategies for College Success

    An integrated approach to college-level reading and study strategies, including concentration, comprehension, note-taking, test-taking, and time management, designed to accompany Humanities 101. Not applicable toward the 128 hours required for a degree. Offered fall term each year. Two semester hours.

  • HUMN 101: Ancient and Medieval Cultures

    An interdisciplinary course involving extensive reading in the history, literature, philosophy, and fine arts of cultures from prehistory to the fourteenth century. Offered fall term each year. Four semester hours.

    Note: HUMN 101 is a recommended course of study fall semester for all freshmen working toward a B.A., B.S., B.S.N. or B.S.W. degree. Except for those experiencing serious academic difficulties, students should continue in HUMN 102, 201, and 202 in subsequent semesters. Once a student enrolls in the daytime program at Milligan College, still needing humanities courses as part of the core, those courses must be taken at Milligan College.

  • HUMN 101M: Ancient and Medieval Cultures

    An interdisciplinary course involving extensive reading in the history, literature, philosophy, and fine arts of cultures from prehistory to the fourteenth century. Offered online spring term as needed. Four semester hours.

    Note: HUMN 101 is a recommended course of study fall semester for all freshmen working toward a B.A., B.S., B.S.N. or B.S.W. degree. Except for those experiencing serious academic difficulties, students should continue in HUMN 102, 201, and 202 in subsequent semesters. Once a student enrolls in the daytime program at Milligan College, still needing humanities courses as part of the core, those courses must be taken at Milligan College.

  • HUMN 102: Renaissance and Early Modern Cultures

    An interdisciplinary course involving extensive reading in the history, literature, philosophy, and fine arts of cultures from the fourteenth to the eighteenth centuries. Offered spring term each year. Four semester hours.

    Note: HUMN 101 is a recommended course of study fall semester for all freshmen working toward a B.A., B.S., B.S.N. or B.S.W. degree. Except for those experiencing serious academic difficulties, students should continue in HUMN 102, 201, and 202 in subsequent semesters. Once a student enrolls in the daytime program at Milligan College, still needing humanities courses as part of the core, those courses must be taken at Milligan College.

  • HUMN 102H: Renaissance and Early Modern Cultures

    An interdisciplinary course involving extensive reading in the history, literature, philosophy, and fine arts of cultures from the fourteenth to the eighteenth centuries. Offered spring term each year. Four credit hours.

  • HUMN 102M: Renaissance and Early Modern Cultures

    An interdisciplinary course involving extensive reading in the history, literature, philosophy, and fine arts of cultures from the fourteenth to the eighteenth centuries. Offered online summer term as needed. Four semester hours.

    Note: HUMN 101 is a recommended course of study fall semester for all freshmen working toward a B.A., B.S., B.S.N. or B.S.W. degree. Except for those experiencing serious academic difficulties, students should continue in HUMN 102, 201, and 202 in subsequent semesters. Once a student enrolls in the daytime program at Milligan College, still needing humanities courses as part of the core, those courses must be taken at Milligan College.

  • HUMN 200P: European Study Tour Preparation

    Students going on the tour are required to register for one hour of HUMN 200P in the spring semester prior to the tour. HUMN 200P includes attending specified sessions (lectures and discussions) focused on twentieth-century Europe and meetings dealing with tour preparation issues. HUMN 200P and HUMN 200T may be taken in lieu of HUMN 202 (4 hours). Prerequisites: HUMN 101 and HUMN 102. Offered every spring term. One semester hour.

  • HUMN 200T: European Study Tour

    A study tour of several European countries. Visits are made to sites of both historical and cultural significance. In addition to travel, students complete writing assignments and fulfill all the academic obligations outlined by the tour professor. HUMN 200T and HUMN 200P may be taken in lieu of HUMN 202 (4 hours). Prerequisites: HUMN 101, HUMN 102, and HUMN 200P. Offered every summer. Three semester hours.

  • HUMN 201: Eighteenth and Nineteenth-Century Cultures

    An interdisciplinary course involving extensive reading in the history, literature, philosophy, and fine arts of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Offered fall term each year. Four semester hours.

    Note: HUMN 101 is a recommended course of study fall semester for all freshmen working toward a B.A., B.S., B.S.N. or B.S.W. degree. Except for those experiencing serious academic difficulties, students should continue in HUMN 102, 201, and 202 in subsequent semesters. Once a student enrolls in the daytime program at Milligan College, still needing humanities courses as part of the core, those courses must be taken at Milligan College.

  • HUMN 201H: 18th and 19th Century Cultures

    An interdisciplinary course involving extensive reading in the history, literature, philosophy, and fine arts of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Offered fall term each year. Four credit hours.

  • HUMN 202: Cultures of the Twentieth and Early Twenty-first Centuries

    An interdisciplinary course involving extensive reading in the history, literature, philosophy, and fine arts of the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Offered spring term each year. Four semester hours.

    Note: HUMN 101 is a recommended course of study fall semester for all freshmen working toward a B.A., B.S., B.S.N. or B.S.W. degree. Except for those experiencing serious academic difficulties, students should continue in HUMN 102, 201, and 202 in subsequent semesters. Once a student enrolls in the daytime program at Milligan College, still needing humanities courses as part of the core, those courses must be taken at Milligan College.

  • HUMN 211: Introduction to Women's and Gender Studies

    This introductory course provides an explicitly interdisciplinary and academically rigorous basis for subsequent coursework in the minor. This course will prepare students to connect theory and practice in dynamic ways, to engage in critical self-reflection, to cultivate a deeper awareness of their relationship to self and other, and to consider the impact of gender and gender constructs within their chosen field(s) of study. Offered spring semester even years. Three semester hours.

  • HUMN 290: Independent Study

    Individual study to enable the student either to study material not in the curriculum or to facilitate an individualized approach in a field not now covered in a single course. Not open to freshmen. One to three semester hours.

  • HUMN 380: Jesus in the Arts

    An exploration of the creative images of Jesus throughout the centuries, drawing examples from the literary, dramatic, visual, musical, kinetic, and cinematic arts, seeking a deeper appreciation for the arts in the life of the church and for the impact of the image of Jesus in people’s lives. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

  • HUMN 385: What Happens After We Die

    A seminar that approaches the question of postmortem existence through the chronological study of texts and artworks belonging to diverse religious and philosophical traditions. Offered in spring 2016 and 2019. Three semester hours.

  • HUMN 490: Reading and Research in Humane Learning

    An individualized course of study to be determined by the student and an advisory committee. At least three hours of Humanities 490 are required for every humanities major. Three to six semester hours per semester.

  • HUMN 495: Seminar

    A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from semester to semester. One to three semester hours.

  • HUMN 499A: Mentored Research

    A faculty-mentored research course in which students craft a research proposal, prepare a literature review, and outline the methods by which they plan to conduct research. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

  • HUMN 499B: Mentored Research

    A faculty-mentored research course in which students complete their research in a manner consistent with practices in their discipline and submit a written draft of their findings to their mentor. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

  • HUMN 499C: Mentored Research

    A faculty-mentored research course in which students revise their research and present their findings publicly. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

  • LS 304: Law, Politics and Global Development

    An examination of the function of law and politics in both domestic and international economic development. Concentration will be given to understanding the importance and influence of governmental institutions and specific laws upon individual societies, in particular, developing countries. This course fulfills the ethnic studies course requirement in the general education core. Offered spring term odd years. Cross-listed as LS/POLS 304. Three semester hours.

  • LS 310: Philosophy of Law

    A detailed study of judicial decision-making and its relationship to the handling of disputes at different levels of the legal structure and various stages of the legal process. Using case-law materials, the techniques of legal reasoning and styles of legal thinking, along with the ways in which judicial decisions are able to respond to the demands of social change, are investigated. Consideration is given to techniques of reading legal texts, strategies of interpretation, legal reasoning, decision-making, and persuasion. Offered fall term even years. Cross-listed as POLS 310. Three semester hours.

  • LS 320: Constitutional Law

    A survey of the historical development of the American Constitution with concentration on the role of the judicial branch of the government as arbiter in determining the respective limits on national and state power, in protecting the individual against that national and state activity which offends the Bill of Rights and other constitutional guarantees of liberty and property, and in securing civil rights. Selected Supreme Court cases will be studied. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

  • LS 330: Family Law

    An examination of the relationship between the American family, the law, and the church. Topics include the legal definitions of marriage and family; the rights and obligations within the family; the role of church and government in marriage and family life; the dissolution of marriage and related issues such as the distribution of marital assets, alimony, child custody, visitation, and support; the issues of paternity, adoption and surrogacy will also be explored. Offered spring term even years.

  • LS 340: Juvenile Justice

    An exploration of all phases of the contemporary juvenile justice system and an examination of the nature of delinquency, classifications of juvenile offenders, alternative explanations for juvenile misconduct, juvenile courts and juvenile rights, treatment, and corrections. Major court rulings that have shaped contemporary juvenile justice are presented as well. Students also have the opportunity to observe parts of the juvenile justice system first-hand by attending a juvenile court session and visiting a correctional facility for adjudicated delinquents. Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours.

  • LS 355: Criminal Law and Procedure

    A broad introduction to the American criminal justice system. Topics include how crimes are legally defined, legal defenses, and Constitutional limitations. The three major components of the criminal justice system are examined: law enforcement, the judicial system, and corrections. In particular, the focus is on each component’s relationship to substantive and procedural law. Offered fall term odd years. Three semester hours.

  • LS 420: Law and Christianity

    A study of the relationship that exists between Christianity and the law. Students examine the issues of how human laws relate to God’s laws, the foundational principles of a biblical jurisprudence, the nature of responsibility and punishment, mercy and judgment. Attention is paid to whether law can truly be considered a calling and the unique responsibility Christian legal professionals have in society. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

  • LS 491: Internship

    A supervised field work in various law offices and legal agencies, designed to give the student broad exposure and initial practical competencies. Three to six semester hours.

  • LS 494: Capstone Seminar

    A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, and writing regarding such issues as Christianity, law, governance, politics, and social justice. Cross-listed as POLS 494. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

  • LS 495: Seminar

    A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research and writing in areas not included in the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from semester to semester. One to three semester hours.

  • LS 499A: Mentored Research

    A faculty-mentored research course in which students craft a research proposal, prepare a literature review, and outline the methods by which they plan to conduct research. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

  • LS 499B: Mentored Research

    A faculty-mentored research course in which students complete their research in a manner consistent with practices in their discipline and submit a written draft of their findings to their mentor. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

  • LS 499C: Mentored Research

    A faculty-mentored research course in which students revise their research and present their findings publicly. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

  • MATH 090: Math Strategies for College Success

    A review of basic arithmetic and an introduction to beginning topics in algebra. This course attempts to build connections between arithmetic and algebra and to ease the transition to a class in College Algebra or other college level work. It also includes topics in beginning statistics and geometry. It is not applicable toward the 128 hours required for a degree. Students are not allowed to withdraw from MATH 090. Offered spring term each year. Two semester hours.

  • MATH 107: Principles of Mathematics

    An introduction to a variety of mathematical fields including analysis, algebra, probability and statistics, logic, number theory, and topology, together with an analysis of some of the major contributions mathematics has made to civilization. Offered every term. Three semester hours.