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Course Descriptions

  • GNSC 101: Science in Your World

    An introductory general science course which focuses upon the practice of science and how consumers can make informed decisions about science as it impacts their world. Offered fall term each year. Two semester hours.

  • GNSC 301: Critical Thinking in the Sciences

    An exploration of the application of critical reasoning strategies to standardized test questions as found on professional exams (such as the GRE, MCAT, PCAT, DAT, etc.). After reviewing content in biology, general chemistry, and organic chemistry, students will utilize a critical thinking approach to answer practice questions. Review of the way the practice questions were structured as well as the answer choices will reinforce how the critical thinking process could/should be applied to arrive at the correct answer. Offered spring semester every year. One semester hour.

  • GNSC 350: Basic Applications of Scientific Principles

    A course focusing upon the understanding of scientific principles and the modeling of scientific principles in a variety of situations. This course is intended to improve science pedagogy by introducing students to basic scientific methods and principles, and by focusing on state and national science standards for educators. Prerequisites: BIOL 110 and PHYS 104 or the equivalent. Not applicable to a major or minor in either biology or chemistry. This course does not fulfill the science requirement in the GER. Offered spring term each year. Two semester hours.

  • GNSC 350B: Basic Applications of Scientific Principles

    A course focusing upon the understanding of scientific principles and the modeling of scientific principles in a variety of situations. This course is intended to improve science pedagogy by introducing students to basic scientific methods and principles, and by focusing on state and national science standards for educators. Prerequisites: BIOL 110 and PHYS 104 or the equivalent. This course does not fulfill the science requirement in the GER. Offered fifth term. Two semester hours.

  • GRDS 180: Visual Storytelling and Communication

    A course which introduces the student to the fundamental principles of design and how they relate to communication. The course will explore basic media and design tools. Topics include perception, the creative design process, the basic elements of design, and how to manipulate those elements to convey information and meaning. Offered every term. Three semester hours.

  • GRDS 250: History of Graphic Design

    A course that details the history of visual communication from prehistoric times to the digital age. The course examines innovation in technology and communication as well as stylistic movements and their lasting impact on the field. Content will also focus on specific designers, their work, and their influence. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

  • GRDS 256: Graphic Design I

    A study of design principles, theories, and skills as applied to print, video, and web-based publication and production, with an emphasis on conceptual thinking and problem-solving. Practical techniques will be learned from conception to finished product. Students will complete projects using vector-based and other design software commonly used in various forms of mass media. Cross listed as COMM 256. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

  • GRDS 313: Publication Design

    A course designed to give students practice and experience with the leading software programs to create professional-looking publications including postcards, advertisements, letterhead, business cards, logo designs, etc. Publication design concepts and theories are discussed. Other skills learned in this course include scanning, graphic editing, and digital camera basics. Recommended prerequisite: CIS 175 or consent of instructor. Rotating years offered both terms one year, then spring term only. Three semester hours.

  • GRDS 330: Typography

    A study of the design, history, and fundamentals of using letterforms and typography as applied to graphic design and visual communication. Design projects will cover the principals of typography as an essential skill for a graphic designer. Students will build skills in typeface choice, manipulation, and building a hierarchy of information. Prerequisites: GRDS 180 Visual Storytelling and Communication and GRDS 256 Graphic Design I, or consent of instructor. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

  • GRDS 456: Graphic Design II

    An advanced course that continues the study of design concepts and techniques for visual communication. Students will work at a higher skill level with design software applications. Projects will be more complex and geared toward developing a high level of visual problem-solving and toward building work for the student’s design portfolio. Prerequisites: GRDS 256 Graphic Design I and GRDS 323 Typography, or consent of the instructor. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

  • GRDS 460: Graphic Design Agency/Portfolio Development

    An advanced course where students will pursue and receive assignments from actual clients from the campus and community. Students will build their portfolio and will gain experience in graphic design business practices. Prerequisites: GRDS 256 Graphic Design I, GRDS 323 Typography, and GRDS 456 Graphic Design II or consent of the instructor. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

  • GRDS 490: Directed Study

    A course which allows directed study and individualized instruction in graphic design under the supervision of the graphic design professor. Required of all students graduating with a graphic design major. The directed study can include an exhibit of graphic design work, an internship focusing on graphic design projects approved by the graphic design professor, or a directed study directed by the graphic design professor. Offered every term. Student may repeat as necessary to accumulate credit hours. Prerequisites: GRDS 456 Graphic Design II. Offered every term. One semester hour.

  • GREE 111: Elementary Greek

    A study of the elements of Koine Greek including drill on simple phrases and sentences and the acquisition of vocabulary. Selected readings in New Testament literature are included in the second semester. Greek 111 offered fall term each year; Greek 112 offered spring term each year. Three semester hours each semester. Students must pass GREE 111 before enrolling in GREE 112.

  • GREE 112: Elementary Greek

    A study of the elements of Koine Greek including drill on simple phrases and sentences and the acquisition of vocabulary. Selected readings in New Testament literature are included in the second semester. Greek 111 offered fall term each year; Greek 112 offered spring term each year. Three semester hours each semester. Students must pass GREE 111 before enrolling in GREE 112.

  • GREE 221: Intermediate Greek

    The translation and grammatical analysis of New Testament passages representing a cross-section of Greek styles. The course also includes a study of intermediate grammar and some work with textual critical apparatus. Greek 221 offered fall term each year; Greek 222 offered spring term each year. Three semester hours each semester. Students must pass GREE 112 before enrolling in GREE 221. Students must pass GREE 221 before enrolling in GREE 222.

  • GREE 222: Intermediate Greek

    The translation and grammatical analysis of New Testament passages representing a cross-section of Greek styles. The course also includes a study of intermediate grammar and some work with textual critical apparatus. Greek 221 offered fall term each year; Greek 222 offered spring term each year. Three semester hours each semester. Students must pass GREE 112 before enrolling in GREE 221. Students must pass GREE 221 before enrolling in GREE 222.

  • GREE 290: Independent Study

    Individual study to enable the student either to study material not in the curriculum or to facilitate an individualized approach in a field not now covered in a single course. Not open to freshmen. One to three semester hours.

  • GREE 331: Advanced Greek Exegesis

    The study and practice of exegetical methodologies for interpreting the Greek New Testament, with concentration on their uses in teaching and preaching. Introduction to textual criticism is included. Offered fall term as needed. Three semester hours.

  • GREE 332: Advanced Greek Readings

    Selected readings in the Septuagint, Philo, Josephus, and the Apostolic Fathers with attention to historical-theological contributions of these writers and works. Offered spring term as needed. Three semester hours.

  • GREE 499A: Mentored Research

    A faculty-mentored research course in which students craft a research proposal, prepare a literature review, and outline the methods by which they plan to conduct research. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

  • GREE 499B: Mentored Research

    A faculty-mentored research course in which students complete their research in a manner consistent with practices in their discipline and submit a written draft of their findings to their mentor. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

  • GREE 499C: Mentored Research

    A faculty-mentored research course in which students revise their research and present their findings publicly. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

  • HEBR 111: Elementary Biblical Hebrew

    A study of the elements of biblical Hebrew, with an emphasis on vocabulary, verbal morphology, and basic grammar. Selected readings from the Hebrew Bible are included in the second semester. Offered fall and spring terms in periodic years. Three hours each semester.

  • HEBR 112: Elementary Biblical Hebrew

    A study of the elements of biblical Hebrew, with an emphasis on vocabulary, verbal morphology, and basic grammar. Selected readings from the Hebrew Bible are included in the second semester. Offered fall and spring terms in periodic years. Three hours each semester.

  • HEBR 211: Intermediate Biblical Hebrew

    A study of biblical Hebrew emphasizing grammar and syntax, with concentration on achieving facility in reading the Hebrew Bible. Some attention is given to the use of textual critical apparatus. Offered fall and spring terms in periodic years. Three hours each semester.

  • HEBR 212: Intermediate Biblical Hebrew

    A study of biblical Hebrew emphasizing grammar and syntax, with concentration on achieving facility in reading the Hebrew Bible. Some attention is given to the use of textual critical apparatus. Offered fall and spring terms in periodic years. Three hours each semester.

  • HIST 206: History of Islam

    A study of the political, religious, social, and cultural institutions of the Islamic world from the birth of Muhammad to the modern period. This course fulfills the ethnic studies course requirement in the general education core. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

  • HIST 208: History of the Jews since A.D. 70

    A social, cultural, theological, and political study of the Jewish people in the last two millennia. The course examines the influence and victimization of the Jews in Diaspora, giving special attention to such issues as the development of sacred texts; the rise of Christian-anti-Semitism; ghettoization and Enlightenment of European Jewry; the development of Hassidic, Reform, Conservative and Reconstruction Judaism; philo-Semitism; political anti-Semitism; Zionism; the Holocaust; the establishment and maintenance of the State of Israel; and dispensationalism. Part of a three-year cycle in European history, this course will be offered in spring term of 2015. The course fulfills the ethnic studies requirement in the general education core. Three semester hours.

  • HIST 209: United States History Survey I

    A study of the history of the United States from the European encounter to the War Between the States. The course examines the growth of political institutions and the social and economic life of the people of the United States. Prerequisite: Humanities 101 and 102, or consent of instructor. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

  • HIST 210: United States History Survey II

    A study of the history of the United States from the War Between the States to the 1970s. The course examines the growth of political institutions and the social and economic life of the people of the United States. Prerequisite: Humanities 101 and 102 , or consent of instructor. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

  • HIST 250: Christ, Hitler, and Women: The German Church Struggle 1933-1945

    A study of the Nazi persecution of Catholic and Protestant Churches, with special concentration on the role of women in the Confessing Church. Part of a three-year cycle in European history. Three semester hours.

  • HIST 271: History of Christian Missions

    A survey of the history and progress of missions since the beginning of Christianity. Offered only on demand. Three semester hours. Same as CMIN 271.

  • HIST 275: Selected Topics: : The Stone-Campbell Movement

    An examination of the Stone-Campbell heritage including both primary and secondary readings intended to help students understand the church tradition (the “Restoration Movement”) that is linked to the history of Milligan College. Students may not apply this course to a major in Bible or history. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of instructor. Offered fall term each year. One semester hour.

  • HIST 290: Independent Study

    Individual study to enable the student either to study material not in the curriculum or to facilitate an individualized approach in a field not now covered in a single course. Not open to freshmen. One to three semester hours.

  • HIST 295: Seminar

    A seminar designed to promote lectures, discussion, research, and writing at an introductory level in areas not included in the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from semester to semester. One to three semester hours.

  • HIST 306: Medieval European Society

    A study of the development of Western European civilization from the collapse of the Roman Empire through the fourteenth century. The course encompasses the political, economic, religious, and intellectual dimensions of medieval European culture and society. Prerequisite: HUMN 101-102 and 201-202, or six hours of European history, or consent of instructor. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

  • HIST 316: The Press in Society

    A study of the history and development of news and news media and their role and impact in modern societies. The course will examine cultural, religious, political, technological, and economic interactions between “the press” and the societies in which they operate, paying particular attention to the United States. Cross listed as COMM 316. Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours.

  • HIST 323: Christian Thought in Greco-Roman World

    A course of readings in various representatives of the Christian tradition from the second through the fifth century, including Origen, Tertullian, Cyprian, Athanasius, Ambrose, and Augustine in their historical contexts. Special attention is given to the contributions of these thinkers to the development of the Christian tradition. This course may satisfy the Church history core elective for the Bible major. Prerequisites: HUMN 101-102 and 201-202, or consent of the instructor. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

  • HIST 324: Roman History through the Pax Romana

    A study of Rome’s progress from its origins through its Republican period and the peak of its Empire in the first two centuries of the Christian era (the Pax Romana). Prerequisite: HUMN 101-102 and 201-202, or six hours of European history, or consent of instructor. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

  • HIST 326: Late Roman and Byzantine Empires

    A study of Roman history from the end of the Pax Romana in the late second century A.D. The course examines the centuries of decline and collapse in the Western Empire as well as the Byzantine Empire to 1453. Prerequisites: HUMN 101-102 and 201-202 and HIST 324, or consent of instructor. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

  • HIST 331: History of Modern Britain 1688-Present

    A diplomatic and cultural study of the British Isles since the Glorious Revolution of 1688. This course examines the remarkable British record of increasingly democratic constitutional reform that avoided the violence that shook the rest of Europe in the last three centuries. The study focuses special attention on the political, philosophical, and religious movements that have produced modern Britain. Prerequisites: HUMN 101, 102, 201, 202 or consent of the instructor. Part of a three-year cycle in European history.. Three semester hours.

  • HIST 332: History of Modern France, 1789 – Present

    A diplomatic and cultural study of France since the Revolution of 1789. This course examines France’s mercurial role as a Western power, and its vacillation between republicanism and autocracy through five republics and two empires. The course focuses special attention on the role of religion in the cultural and political life of the country. Prerequisite: HUMN 101-102 and 201-202 or consent of the instructor. Part of a three-year cycle in European history.. Three semester hours.

  • HIST 333: History of Modern Germany, 1806-present

    A diplomatic and cultural study of Germany since the Congress of Vienna, this course examines Germany’s rise from fragmentation within the Holy Roman Empire to its present role as an economic and cultural European giant. The study focuses special attention on the philosophical and religious movements that have shaped Germany’s national character. Prerequisites: HUMN 101-102 and 201-202 or consent of the instructor. Part of a three-year cycle in European history. Three semester hours.

  • HIST 334: Issues in 20th Century Europe

    A study of political, social, religious, and philosophical issues in Europe during the twentieth century This course examines the continent’s major political philosophies: Marxism, fascism, and democracy. It investigates the “isms” of the past century, among them nationalism, anti-Semitism, Zionism, and imperialism with their related issues of church/state relations, emigration, xenophobia, union, and an alleged “post-Christian” age. Class discussion ties current events to their historical antecedents. Prerequisites: HUMN 101-102 and 201-202 or instructor’s permission. Part of a three-year cycle in European history. Three semester hours.

  • HIST 341: Church History

    A study of the history of the church from its beginning to the present. The course examines the rise of theological patterns, denominational developments, and the church’s response to prevailing culture. Prerequisites: HUMN 101-102 and 201-202 or six hours of history and consent of instructor. HIST 341 offered fall term and HIST 342 offered spring term each year. Three semester hours each semester.

  • HIST 342: Church History

    A study of the history of the church from its beginning to the present. The course examines the rise of theological patterns, denominational developments, and the church’s response to prevailing culture. Prerequisites: HUMN 101-102 and 201-202 or six hours of history and consent of instructor. HIST 341 offered fall term and HIST 342 offered spring term each year. Three semester hours each semester.

  • HIST 343: History of Biblical Interpretation

    A survey of the history of hermeneutics and exegesis in the Christian tradition from the ancient through the modern periods. The course examines the various principles and methods adopted by theologians in their attempts to explain the meaning of the biblical text. The course emphasizes a program of readings in commentaries and homiletic literature representing different periods in the history of Christianity. This course may satisfy the Church history core elective for the Bible major. Prerequisites: HUMN 101-102 and 201-202 or consent of the instructor. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

  • HIST 344: The Historical Jesus

    A study of how scholars have attempted to develop historical reconstructions of the life of Jesus. This course will survey the progress of scholarly and popular treatment of the topic, the variety and nature of documents upon which historical reconstructions are based, and the major methods used to test historicity and evaluation of these methods. The relationship between historical reconstructions and the Jesus of faith will be considered. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

  • HIST 345: History of Modern Theology

    An investigation into how the Protestant and Roman Catholic theology unfolded in Europe and North America in the wake of the Enlightenment. This investigation begins in the late eighteenth century and terminates with theological trajectories that appeared in the middle of the twentieth century. Although due attention will be paid to the socio-political context of theology, the heart of the course is the close reading and interpretation of primary sources. Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester hours.

  • HIST 352: Reformations of the Sixteenth Century

    A study of the religious and theological reform movements in sixteenth-century Europe. The course focuses on the various theologies of the period, exploring the meaning of the term “reformation” as it applies to the various religious movements: Lutheran, Reformed, Radical, and Catholic. This course may satisfy the Church history core elective for the Bible major. Prerequisite: HUMN 101-102 and 201-202, or six hours of European history, or consent of instructor. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.