Course Descriptions

Updated Fall 2013

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Course numbers with a “B” suffix are offered in the adult degree completion programs. Course numbers with an “M” suffix are offered online.

ACCOUNTING

ACCT 211. Introductory Accounting I - An introduction to the principles and the practice of accounting. Coverage is given to the fundamentals of recording, summarizing, analyzing, and reporting financial information in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. Although all business entities are discussed, the primary focus is the accounting system of the sole proprietorship. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

ACCT 212. Introductory Accounting II - A continuation of the fundamentals of the principles of accounting. Coverage begins with partnerships and corporations and the accounting issues related to these entities. Attention is then given to the fundamentals of managerial accounting principles and systems, with an emphasis on recording, reporting, analysis, and decision-making. Prerequisite: ACCT 211. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

ACCT 301. Intermediate Accounting I - An in-depth study of financial accounting topics as well as recent developments in accounting valuation and reporting practices. Detailed attention is provided to recording, reporting, and disclosure of financial information. Emphasis is primarily given to statements of income and retained earnings and the asset accounts of the balance sheet. Prerequisite: ACCT 212. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

ACCT 302. Intermediate Accounting II - A continuation of the in-depth study of financial accounting topics. Emphasis is given to liabilities and stockholders equity accounts of the balance sheet and the statement of cash flows. Also covered are the topics of: earnings per share, investments, income taxes, pensions and other retirement benefits, leases, accounting changes, and error analysis. Prerequisite: ACCT 301. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

ACCT 311. Managerial Accounting - A study of the use of accounting information for managerial decisions with emphasis on the role of the controller and the “Planning and Control” techniques used in modern industrial and commercial organizations. Prerequisite: ACCT 212. Offered fall term odd years. Three semester hours.

ACCT 312. Auditing  - A study of the concepts and standards of independent auditing with an emphasis on the decision-making process. The overall audit plan and program are presented with regard to: professional ethical and legal responsibilities, audit and other attestation reports, planning and documentation, evidence, materiality, and internal control. This course includes an emphasis on the detailed application of the audit process to financial statement cycles in addition to the types and application of audit tests needed for evidence gathering purposes and completion of the audit process. Prerequisite: ACCT 212. Offered fall term even years. Three semester hours.

ACCT 315. Not-For-Profit Accounting - A study of accounting principles and techniques uniquely applicable to the public and not-for-profit sectors of economic organizations. This course includes the principles of “Fund Accounting” as well as controllership techniques utilized in managing not-for-profit and governmental institutions. Prerequisite: ACCT 212. Offered fall term odd years. Three semester hours.

ACCT 320B. Accounting for Managerial Decision Making - A focus on the meaningful comprehension of accounting fundamentals through an analysis of the relationships between accounting events and financial statements. Topics include: cash flows, financial statement analysis, budgeting, and standards. Offered Term Two. Four semester hours.

ACCT 351. Development of U.S. Accounting Profession and Standards - An historical perspective of the U.S. accounting profession and standards from colonial times to modern day. This course examines the evolution of the accounting profession as well as the development of accounting standards. Prerequisite: ACCT 212. Offered fall term even years. Three semester hours.

ACCT 352. International Financial Reporting - A course comparing and contrasting U.S. financial reporting with that of different nations. Emphasis is given to the role an individual country’s culture has on its domestic financial reporting. Attention is also given to the development and issuance of international or global accounting standards. Prerequisite: ACCT 212. Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours.

ACCT 412. Federal Income Taxation - An overview study of the U.S. income taxation of individuals, corporations, partnerships, trusts, and estates as well as the U.S. estate and gift taxation. This course focuses on the concepts of inclusions and exclusions of gross income, exemptions, personal and business deductions, losses, and cost recovery as they are applied to individuals and businesses. Prerequisite: ACCT 212. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

ACCT 415. Advanced Accounting: Theory - A continuation of the study of the principles of accounting with emphasis on the more complex accounting environment. This includes such areas as business combinations, bankruptcies and other liquidations, intercompany transactions, segment reporting and accounting, and reporting for the Securities and Exchange Commission. Prerequisite: ACCT 301. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

ACCT 430. Accounting Information Systems - An introduction to the concepts of accounting information systems. Emphasis is on the definition of accounting information, current accounting technology, the systems development life cycle, systems controls, accounting transaction cycles, and related documents and files. Prerequisite: ACCT 302. Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours.

ACCT 491. Internship - A practicum experience, which involves the student in a supervised position in business for the dual purpose of learning about accounting and possible occupational choices. Prerequisite: consent of major professor. Offered every term. One to six semester hours.

ACCT 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in the regular course offerings. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

ACCT 499A. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students craft a research proposal, prepare a literature review, and outline the methods by which they plan to conduct research. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

ACCT 499B. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students complete their research in a manner consistent with practices in their discipline and submit a written draft of their findings to their mentor. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

ACCT 499C. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students revise their research and present their findings publicly. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

ACCT 530.  Seminar in Managerial Accounting - A course covering the organizational development of financial and nonfinancial budgets, interaction among performance measurement systems and human behavior, and advanced topics in uses of information for decision-making. Three semester hours.

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ART

ART 110. Design Fundamentals - An introductory course designed to strengthen visual problem-solving, color awareness, use of value, and composition skills. Students will work in a variety of media on a series of projects that promote the above-mentioned skills, in the context of studying key works of art by artists of historical significance. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

ART 120. Fine Arts Colloquium - An introductory course featuring lectures, discussions, guest speakers, and field trips to area museums, galleries, and theatres through which fine arts students will gain an appreciation of the many resources in the immediate geographical area. While enrollment is open to any student, this course is required for all fine arts majors in their first fall term as a fine arts major. Offered fall term each year. One semester hour.

ART 237. Basic Photography – Introductory course in traditional black and white photography including composition, exposure, camera operations, and basic darkroom techniques. Cross-listed as COMM 237. Offered every term. Three semester hours.

ART 250. Drawing I - A drawing fundamentals class that is a requirement for the fine arts major (art emphasis) but is also appropriate for non-art majors. Emphases include contour, gesture, and a variety of approaches to value in various traditional media. Subject matter includes the human figure, landscape, and still life as well as drawing from the imagination. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

ART 251. Painting I - A course at the beginning level for fine arts (art) majors and non-art majors. Emphases include color mixing, paint application techniques, knowledge of materials, and historical and contemporary approaches. Subject matter and projects vary from figure and still life to abstraction of non-figurative assignments. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

ART 252. Watercolor Workshop - A study in watercolor methods, concepts, and approaches related to the medium of watercolor, its practice, and its history. The course is designed so those students with little or no experience should feel comfortable alongside students who already possess some skills and understanding of the medium. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

ART 253. Introduction to Ceramics - An introductory course in the art/craft of ceramics. The emphasis is on hand-built ceramics with the added potential for students to gain some knowledge of wheel-thrown techniques. Offered fall term odd years. Three semester hours.

ART 287. Digital Photography I - A study of the concepts and practices of effective digital photography; examining the terminology, resources and techniques used in capturing, processing and enhancing digital images. Cross-listed as COMM 287. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

ART 310. Intermediate Photography - An opportunity for students to expand their understanding of techniques and ideas presented in Basic Photography. Emphasis is placed on personal interpretation and visual communication. Prerequisite: ART 237. Cross-listed as COMM 310. Offered every term. Three semester hours.

ART 312. Introduction to Color Photography - An introduction to basic color photographic materials and techniques. Students are introduced to exposure, lighting, developing and printing processes as they relate to the world of color photography. The aesthetics of color photography will be emphasized throughout the semester in hands-on printing sessions, critiques, and discussions. Students develop a better understanding and appreciation of the differences between black and white and color photography. Cross listed as COMM 312. Prerequisites: ART 237 and 310. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

ART 337. Photojournalism - An examination of photojournalism designed to help students realize the potential of photography as a powerful means of visual communication. This course will cover technical and visual skills, as well as history, traditions, viewpoints, legal and ethical issues, and the role of the modern photojournalist in today’s changing world. Guest photojournalists will share their experiences with the class throughout the semester. Prerequisite: ART 237. Cross listed as COMM 337. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

ART 350. Drawing II - A course that builds on skills developed in Drawing I. Composition and creative problem solving are stressed within the context of assignments that allow students to explore multiple approaches to a few select themes. Color drawing media are also emphasized. Offered fall term odd years. Three semester hours.

ART 351. Painting II - A course designed to allow students who have developed a basic understanding of color and painting techniques from Painting I to focus on a more personal direction in terms of content and choice of media as agreed on between student and instructor. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

ART 367. American Art: Colonial to Present - An in-depth study of the history of American art from colonial time to the present. Topics include painting, sculpture, architecture, photography, and cross-discipline arts. Offered fall term even years. Three semester hours.

ART 368. European Art of the 19th Century – An in-depth study of European art styles and movements from 1800 – 1899 with an emphasis on Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, Post-impressionism, and Symbolism. Offered fall term odd years. Three semester hours.

ART 387. Digital Photography II - An advanced study of the concepts and techniques presented in Digital Photography I allowing students the opportunity to extend their photographic skills in the digital medium.  Emphasis is placed on personal interpretation and advanced camera functions and techniques in image enhancement. Prerequisite: ART/COMM 287. Cross-listed as COMM 387. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

ART 400. Field Studies in Fine Arts - A study tour to a selected city in the United States for the purpose of studying various aspects of the fine arts, notably art, photography, and theatre. Tour leaders arrange visits to galleries and theatres. Specific reading assignments are completed before the trip. Students are required to keep a journal of their experiences and submit a final paper, which reflects on those experiences. Offered spring term each year. One semester hour.

ART 411. Printmaking Studio - A course designed to allow students to explore relief printmaking (woodcut, linocut) as well as a limited number of intaglio (etching, drypoint) techniques. Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours.

ART 421. The Arts, Faith, and Culture – The fine arts senior capstone course featuring guest lectures, portfolio development, and discussions on the challenges of being a Christian and an artist in today’s society. The course also requires a group service project. Offered spring term each year. One semester hour.

ART 431. Sculpture Studio - An introductory course in three-dimensional problem-solving. Students work in a variety of materials as a means of understanding basic approaches to sculptural design through projects that range from the human figure to non-figurative forms. Offered fall term even years. Three semester hours.

ART 437. Advanced Black and White/Color - An advanced approach to black and white and/or color traditional and digital printing techniques. Emphasis is placed on establishing a personal style and creating a strong body of work. The student explores further the medium of photography through the use of small, medium, and/or large format cameras. Various photographers are studied, and several critiques are held throughout the semester. Prerequisites: ART 237, 310, and 312. Offered as needed. Three semester hours.

ART 441. Fine Arts Methods - A study of art, music, and storytelling strategies and techniques useful to the teacher of children, birth through early adolescence. Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the professional level of the teacher education program. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

ART 456. Graphic Design - A study of design principles, theories, and skills as applied to print, video, and web-based publication and production, with an emphasis on conceptual thinking and problem-solving. Practical techniques will be learned from conception to finished product. Students will complete projects using vector-based and other design software commonly used in various forms of mass media. Cross listed as COMM 456. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

ART 466. History of Photography - An overview of the history of photography from its beginning to present day. Lectures and class discussions examine the work of major photographers through the framework of historical, cultural, and social trends. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

ART 490. Directed Studies - Independent work for the junior or senior art or photography student in an area of the student’s interest. The program is under the supervision of an art or photography professor. Students may take this course repeatedly and accumulate credit hours. Offered every term. One to three semester hours.

ART 494. Senior Exhibition - A course designed to give graduating seniors an opportunity to present an exhibition of their artwork. The course also allows additional directed study and individualized instruction. Required of all students with a fine arts major and an emphasis in art or photography. The program is under the supervision of an art or photography professor. Offered every term. Three semester hours.

ART 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in the regular course offerings. Not offered every year. One to three semester hours.

ART 499A. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students craft a research proposal, prepare a literature review, and outline the methods by which they plan to conduct research. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

ART 499B. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students complete their research in a manner consistent with practices in their discipline and submit a written draft of their findings to their mentor. Offered every semester as needed.  One semester hour.

ART 499C. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students revise their research and present their findings publicly. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

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BIBLE

BIBL 123. Old Testament Survey - An examination of the Old Testament, its content, background, and significance. Required of all students. Also available as an online course. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

BIBL 123M. Old Testament Survey - An examination of the Old Testament, its content, background, and significance. Not available to all students. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

BIBL 124. New Testament Survey - A study of the New Testament, including a survey of its Jewish and Hellenistic backgrounds. Required of all students. Also available as an online course to select students. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

BIBL 124M. New Testament Survey - A study of the New Testament, including a survey of its Jewish and Hellenistic backgrounds. Not available to all students. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

BIBL 201. Jesus in the Gospels - A study of the Gospels with the intent of showing their distinctive insights into the person and work of Christ. Required for the Bible major. Prerequisite: BIBL 124. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

BIBL 202. Acts - An analysis of the history, theology, and nature of the early church as seen in the Book of Acts. Satisfies the New Testament elective in the Bible major. Prerequisite: BIBL 124. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

BIBL 211. Old Testament Images of God - An introduction to the character and actions of the Lord God of Israel as seen through the Old Testament. Required for the Bible major. Prerequisite: BIBL 123. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

BIBL 252. Biblical Archaeology - A study of the history and techniques of archaeology in the biblical world as an historical science together with a survey of Palestinian history as reconstructed by the latest archaeological evidence. The uses of archaeological data for biblical studies are emphasized. Satisfies the Old Testament elective in the Bible major. Offered periodically. Prerequisite: BIBL 123. Three semester hours.

BIBL 275. Selected Topics in the History of the Reformation of the Nineteenth Century - An examination of the Stone-Campbell heritage including both primary and secondary readings intended to help students understand the church tradition (the “Restoration Movement”) that is linked to the history of Milligan College. Students may not apply this course to a major in Bible or history. Same as HIST 275. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of instructor. Offered periodically. One semester hour.

BIBL 295. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from year to year. Offered periodically. One to three semester hours.

BIBL 301. The Prophets - Exegetical studies in the books of the latter prophets. Attention will be given to the character and message of each prophet and book as seen against their social, political, and historical backgrounds. Satisfies the Old Testament elective in the Bible major. Prerequisite: BIBL 123. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

BIBL 304. Old Testament History - Exegetical studies in the historiographical books of the Old Testament. Attention is given to the theological perspectives and historiographical methods that guided the composition of these books. Satisfies the Old Testament elective in the Bible major. Prerequisite: BIBL 123. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

BIBL 321. Prison Epistles - An exegetical study of Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, and Philemon. Satisfies the New Testament elective in the Bible major. Prerequisite: BIBL 124. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

BIBL 322. Pastoral Epistles - An exegetical study of 1 and 2 Timothy and Titus. Satisfies the New Testament elective in the Bible major. Prerequisite: BIBL 124. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

BIBL 323. Christian Thought in the Greco-Roman World - A course of readings in various representatives of the Christian tradition from the second through the fifth century, including Origen, Tertullian, Cyprian, Athanasius, Ambrose, and Augustine in their historical contexts. Special attention is given to the contributions of these thinkers to the development of the Christian tradition. Same as HIST 323. Prerequisites: HUMN 101, 102, 201, and 202, or consent of the instructor. Satisfies the church history elective in the Bible major. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

BIBL 324. Johannine Literature - A study of the contents and themes of the Johannine Epistles and the Gospel of John. Satisfies the New Testament elective in the Bible major. Prerequisite: BIBL 124. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

BIBL 325. Apocalyptic Literature - A study of the Book of Revelation and other eschatological and apocalyptic passages in the context of Jewish apocalypticism. Satisfies the New Testament elective in the Bible major. Prerequisite: BIBL 124. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

BIBL 328. Jesus, Paul, and Women – A close study of biblical texts about women, focusing on the gospels and letters of Paul. Significant attention will be given to the ancient contexts, interpretive methods, and modern application. Satisfies the New Testament elective in the Bible major. Prerequisite: BIBL 124. Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours.

BIBL 343. History of Biblical Interpretation - A survey of the history of hermeneutics and exegesis in the Christian tradition from the ancient through the modern periods. The course examines the various principles and methods adopted by theologians in their attempts to explain the meaning of the biblical text. Same as HIST 343. Prerequisites: BIBL 123 and 124, HUMN 101, 102, 201, and 202, or consent of the instructor. Satisfies the Old Testament elective in the Bible major. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

BIBL 344. The Historical Jesus - A study of how scholars have attempted to develop historical reconstructions of the life of Jesus. This course will survey the progress of scholarly and popular treatment of the topic, the variety and nature of documents upon which historical reconstructions are based, and the major methods used to test historicity and evaluation of these methods. The relationship between historical reconstructions and the Jesus of faith will be considered. Same as HIST 344. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

BIBL 351. The Pentateuch - Exegetical studies in the Pentateuch. Attention is given to major theological concepts and narrative artistry. Satisfies the Old Testament elective in the Bible major. Prerequisite: BIBL 123. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

BIBL 352. Old Testament Devotional and Wisdom Literature - Exegetical studies in the devotional and wisdom literature of the Old Testament. Attention is given to the theological, philosophical, and worship-related themes of these books. Satisfies the Old Testament elective in the Bible major. Prerequisite: BIBL 123. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

BIBL 373 Discipleship Living and Learning Community – First part of a two-semester course sequence that will examine the practice of Christian discipleship through a variety of living and learning opportunities experienced within the context of intentional community. During the first semester, students are expected to develop a greater understanding of spiritual formation and the practice of the spiritual disciplines, while at the same time gaining an introductory understanding of how one’s spiritual journey informs the greater community. Students are expected to engage in multiple active learning experiences outside of the classroom. Offered fall term odd years. Two semester hours.

BIBL 374. Discipleship Living and Learning Community 2 - Part two of a two-semester course sequence that will examine the practice of Christian discipleship through a variety of living and learning opportunities experienced within the context of intentional community. During the second semester, students are expected to develop a greater understanding of the role the disciple plays within the community-at-large. Special attention is given to outward-focused practices such as mentoring, hospitality and service. Students are expected to engage in multiple active learning experiences outside of the classroom. Prerequisite: BIBL 373. Offered spring term even years. Two semester hours.

BIBL 380. Jesus in the Arts - An exploration of the creative images of Jesus throughout the centuries, drawing examples from the literary, dramatic, visual, musical, kinetic, and cinematic arts, seeking a deeper appreciation for the arts in the life of the church and for the impact of the image of Jesus in people’s lives. Prerequisite: BIBL 124. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

BIBL 405. The Old Testament in the Church - An historical survey of the reception of the Old Testament as Christian scripture and challenges thereto. The study is based, as much as possible, on readings of primary texts from all periods of church history. Prerequisites: BIBL 123 and HUMN 201 and 202, or consent of the instructor. Satisfies the Old Testament elective in the Bible major. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

BIBL 411. I and II Corinthians - An historical, exegetical, and thematic study of I and II Corinthians. Satisfies the New Testament elective in the Bible major. Prerequisite: BIBL 124. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

BIBL 412. Romans and Galatians - An historical, exegetical, and thematic study of Romans and Galatians. Satisfies the New Testament elective in the Bible major. Offered periodically. Prerequisite: BIBL 124. Three semester hours.

BIBL 422. Intertestamental Literature - A survey of the types of Jewish literature (e.g., apocryphal, pseudepigraphic, wisdom, apocalyptic) and their contents which were influential in the development of Judaism in the last two centuries BC and in the first century AD. Prerequisite: BIBL 123. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

BIBL 452. General Epistles - A study of the contents and themes of non-Pauline letters, especially Hebrews, James, and 1 Peter. Satisfies the New Testament elective in the Bible major. Prerequisite: BIBL 124. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

BIBL 471. Christ and Culture - An examination of how contemporary Western cultures shape how Christians understand and embody their faith, and an exploration of how Christians might respond to these challenges. Required of all seniors. Prerequisites: BIBL 123 and 124. Offered every semester. Three semester hours.

BIBL 471B. Christ and Culture - An examination of how contemporary Western cultures shape how Christians understand and embody their faith, and an exploration of how Christians might respond to these challenges. Prerequisites: BIBL 123 and 124. Offered Term Four. Three semester hours.

BIBL 473. Spirituality in Everyday Life - An historical, theological, and practical exploration of how life in the Spirit may be nurtured and sustained in the midst of everyday life. Prerequisite: junior or senior status. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

BIBL 489. Directed Readings - A supervised program of readings that provides for study of material not included in the regular course offerings. One to three semester hours.

BIBL 490. Senior Project - An individualized course of study (major paper or other appropriate project) to be determined by the student and a faculty committee. This course serves as the culminating project for the General Studies track of the Bible major. Three semester hours.

BIBL 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, writing, and concentration in areas beyond regular course offerings. Topics vary from semester to semester. Offered periodically. One to three semester hours.

BIBL 499A. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students craft a research proposal, prepare a literature review, and outline the methods by which they plan to conduct research. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

BIBL 499B. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students complete their research in a manner consistent with practices in their discipline and submit a written draft of their findings to their mentor. Offered every semester as needed.  One semester hour.

BIBL 499C. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students revise their research and present their findings publicly. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

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BIOLOGY

BIOL 110. General Biology - An introductory course that examines fundamental biological concepts of plants and animals with particular relevance to man’s place in the living world. Offered every term. Three hours lecture and one two-hour lab weekly. Four semester hours.

BIOL 111-112. Principles of Biology - A two-semester course which introduces and integrates the principles of biology including the chemistry of life, cells, genetics, evolution, biological diversity, biology of plants, biology of animals, and ecology. The course is designed to stimulate critical thinking. Offered as a year sequence beginning with the fall term each year. Three hours lecture and one three-hour lab weekly. Four hours each semester.

BIOL 130. Plants and Society - This course is designed to instill a greater appreciation of the botanical world. This course covers basic principles of botany, but more strongly emphasizes the cultural, historical, economic, and practical impacts that plants bring to modern society. Labs will be conducted both indoors and outdoors. Offered fall term each year. Three hours lecture and one two-hour lab weekly. Four semester hours.

BIOL 131. Environmental Studies - An introductory course which examines the intersection of humans with the planet earth. Dynamics surveyed include ecosystems, population biology, biodiversity, food production, geological resources, climate, pollution, and energy resources. This course does not fulfill the laboratory science requirement in the GER. Offered spring term each year. Three hours lecture weekly. Three semester hours.

BIOL 150. Essentials of Human Anatomy and Physiology – An introductory course designed to study the basic structure and function of the organ systems of humans. Offered spring term each year. Three hours lecture and one two-hour lab weekly. Four semester hours.

BIOL 200. Field Studies in Biology - An analysis of selected biological problems and/or in-depth study of unique ecosystems. Subject content varies according to selected topics. The course is conducted at an off-campus location, and the student may incur additional expenses for travel. A student may not accumulate more than four hours credit in this course. This course should not be used to satisfy college degree requirements in science except by permission of the Area Chair of Scientific Learning. Prerequisite: BIOL 110, BIOL 111, or consent of instructors. Offered in the May term each year. One to two semester hours.

BIOL 210. Flora and Fauna of the Southern Appalachian Area - A field biology class with special emphasis on the identification and general ecology of plants and animals in the Southern Appalachian Area. Available to both majors and non-majors. Offered spring term each year. Four semester hours.

BIOL 250-251. Anatomy and Physiology - A two-semester course designed to study the structure and function of the organ systems of humans. Recommended Prerequisite for 250: BIOL 110 or 111; Prerequisite for 251: Successful completion of 250. Offered as a year sequence beginning with the fall term each year. Four hours each semester.

BIOL 280. Introductory Microbiology and Immunology for the Health Sciences - An introductory course in the study of microbial organisms with particular emphasis on relationship to health, disease, and host defense mechanisms. A minimalized, hands-on lab component supplements lectures and discussions. This course may not be taken to fulfill the laboratory science requirement in the GER. This course does not count toward the biology major or minor. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

BIOL 310. Genetics - A study of fundamental principles of heredity with related statistics and probability. Prerequisite: eight hours of biology. Offered fall  term each year. Four semester hours.

BIOL 341. Animal Histology - A study of the microscopic anatomy of the various types of tissues and organs found in vertebrates. Prerequisite: eight hours of biology. Offered as needed. Four semester hours.

BIOL 342. Embryology - A study of the general principles of vertebrate embryological development. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Offered as needed. One to four semester hours.

BIOL 360. Ecology - A study of the relation between organisms and their environment, factors affecting plant and animal structures, behavior and distribution, energy and material cycles, and populations. Prerequisite: four hours of biology. Offered fall term each year. Four semester hours.

BIOL 362. Vertebrate Field Biology - A survey of native warm-blooded vertebrates  with emphasis on field identification. Offered spring term each year. Four semester hours.

BIOL 380. Microbiology and Immunology - A  course in the study of microbial organisms and  including the preparation of media, sterilization, the isolation of microorganisms and their identification, culture, and staining. Topics covered in immunology will include definitions and relationships of antigens and antibodies, host-antigen interaction, bursal and thymic influences on lymphoid cells, and humoral and cellular response mechanisms. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Offered spring  term each year. Four semester hours.

BIOL 430. Advanced Anatomy - A regional study of human anatomy with a majority of the class hours spent in cadaver dissection. Regions and emphasis may vary according to the needs of the students and availability of materials. Prerequisites: BIOL 250 and 251 or consent of the instructor. Offered as needed. One to four semester hours.

BIOL 450. Molecular Biology - A study of gene structure and the regulation of gene expression at transcriptional and translational levels with an emphasis on modern experimental techniques.  Prerequisite: consent of the instructor.  Offered spring term each year. Three hours lecture and one three-hour lab weekly. Four semester hours.

BIOL 451. Research Seminar - A seminar designed to introduce science majors to principles, politics, and methodology used in scientific research. Offered  as needed. One semester hour.

BIOL 452. Cell Biology - A study of the structure, function and biogenesis of various organelles of the eukaryotic cell.  Prerequisite: Eight hours of biology.  Offered fall term each year.  Three hours lecture weekly  (no laboratory). Three semester hours.

BIOL 460. Neuroanatomy - A presentation of functional human neuroanatomy including related pathology. The course includes the study of the human nervous system specimens in a laboratory setting. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

BIOL 490. Research Problem - Research on special problems in biology under direct supervision of a faculty member. Prerequisites: twenty hours of biology courses and consent of the biology faculty member to direct the research problem. Offering to be announced. One to four semester hours.

BIOL 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in the regular course offerings. Offering to be announced. One to three semester hours.

BIOL 499A. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students craft a research proposal, prepare a literature review, and outline the methods by which they plan to conduct research. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

BIOL 499B. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students complete their research in a manner consistent with practices in their discipline and submit a written draft of their findings to their mentor. Offered every semester as needed.  One semester hour.

BIOL 499C. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students revise their research and present their findings publicly. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

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BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

BADM 170. Personal Finance - An overview of personal and family financial planning with an emphasis on record keeping, budgeting, tax planning, credit management, consumer laws, real estate transactions, purchasing insurance, selecting investments, and retirement and estate planning. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

BADM 210. Survey of Business - This course provides students with an overview of business. It covers major topics such as management, marketing, economics/finance, accounting, and information technology. It also explores the role business plays within today’s social framework. This course is open to non-business majors, students who are undecided, or business majors exploring different areas of emphasis. (May not be taken as an upper level division business elective.) Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

BADM 220. Voluntary Income Tax Assistance - A beginning level experience in providing federal income tax preparation services to low/mid income level taxpayers. Students will receive training and certification through the Internal Revenue Service. Once certification is complete, students will prepare returns at various locations in the area. All activities are under the direct supervision of the course instructor. Prerequisite: consent of the course instructor. Offered spring term each year. One to three semester hours.

BADM 290. Independent Study - Individual study to enable the student either to study material not in the curriculum or to facilitate an individualized approach in a field not now covered in a single course. Not open to freshmen. One to three semester hours.

BADM 301. Introduction to Leadership in Organizations – An introduction to leadership with a focus on developing effective skills for organizational leadership.  This course examines the behaviors of leaders in today’s organizations by studying current leadership theories and the theories’ application. Students will use readings, behavior modeling, experiential exercises, and self-reflection, as well as focused coaching and feedback, to optimize their own leadership capabilities in handling real world, day-to-day leadership functions in an ethical and effective manner. The content of this course is suitable for students in all disciplines. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

BADM 304. Advertising - A study of the principles of advertising along with its function and aims in business. Attention is given to the economic and psychological principles involved. There is also a study of market analysis and its importance to the field of advertising. The mechanics of layout, media, and copy writing are considered. Prerequisite: BADM 315. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

BADM 315. Marketing - A survey of marketing planning, buyer behavior, product strategy, distribution strategy, promotional strategy, and pricing strategy from a global perspective. Prerequisite: ECON 202. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

BADM 315B. Principles of Marketing - A survey of marketing principles and problems and a detailed analysis of markets, market prices, and marketing agents. Consideration is given to the struggle among the various agencies for the control of the market. In addition, students will explore the ethical dimensions of marketing from a Christian perspective as well as reflect on the impact of this course to their work experiences. Offered Term Three. Four semester hours.

BADM 317. Consumer Behavior - A course designed to introduce and familiarize students with the basic concepts and procedures for investigating consumers’ buying habits, pre-purchase decision processes, and post-purchase evaluation processes within a dynamic time framework. Emphasis will be on assessing the importance of various factors and elements within the market environment and their influences on the assessment of individuals’ and groups’ attitudinal and behavior outcomes in different market situations. The development of workable managerial strategies based on the understanding of consumers’ behavior will also be emphasized. Prerequisite BADM 315. Offered spring semester even years. Three semester hours.

BADM 318. Marketing Research – A course designed to provide a comprehensive and practical presentation of the field of marketing research. It emphasizes an applied approach through managerially-oriented marketing research cases and a field research project. Prerequisite: BADM 315. Offered spring semester odd years. Three semester hours.

BADM 320. Voluntary Income Tax Assistance Advanced. An advanced level experience in providing federal income tax preparation services to low/mid income level taxpayers. Responsibilities include assisting in managing tax preparation sites, preparing amended income tax returns and assistance in audited returns. Activities are under the direct supervision of the course instructor. Students will receive continued training and certification through the Internal Revenue Service. Prerequisites: BADM 220 and consent of the course instructor. Offered spring term each year. One to three semester hours.

BADM 321. Business Law I - A study of the legal system with an introduction to legal concepts in the areas of the American court system, criminal law, torts, strict liability, intellectual property, contracts, agency and business organizations. Emphasis is placed upon the application of these legal principles to commercial transactions. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

BADM 322. Business Law II - A study of the Uniform Commercial Code with an introduction to the legal concepts in the areas of sales, negotiable instruments, and secured transactions. Additional topics include bankruptcy, insurance, and property law. Emphasis is placed upon the application of these legal principles to commercial transactions. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

BADM 323B. Business Law - A study of the legal system with an introduction to legal concepts as they relate to commercial transactions and the student’s own work experiences. The course also includes an examination of different business organizations and legislation that regulates and affects such businesses. In addition, students will explore the ethical dimensions of business from a Christian perspective. Offered Term Three. Four semester hours.

BADM 326B. Total Quality Management - An introduction to quality control processes in all aspects of an enterprise for the purpose of creating and/or maintaining a value creating operation. Several quality control programs are reviewed, including six sigma and lean manufacturing. Offered Term Four. Four semester hours.

BADM 327B. Logistics - An introduction to basic concepts used to manage product distribution. Emphasis is placed on the process of planning a systematic approach to activities that include customer service, materials and product distribution, traffic management, and network design. Offered Term Four. Four semester hours.

BADM 328B. Supply Chain Management - An introduction to the activities involved in moving materials and information through each firm from the raw material stage to delivery of the final product to the consumer. Some steps in this process include transportation, warehousing, inventory control and information management. The course will incorporate the interrelated nature of the functional areas of business and the role that a holistic management approach plays in the development of an effective and resilient supply chain in an era of increasingly global competition. Offered Term Three. Four semester hours.

BADM 339. Global Marketing - A focus on the theory and practice of contemporary global marketing management. The context or environment of international marketing is covered along with the task of marketing in a variety of national domestic markets with their distinct cultural settings. The course is divided into three major areas: overview of the global marketing environment, moving into international markets, and advanced international marketing management. Classroom instruction is complemented by case studies and projects. Offered summer term each year as part of IBI program. Three semester hours.

BADM 340B. International Business and Economics - A study of the resource allocation that focuses explicitly on transactions conducted across international borders. This study is facilitated by analytical tools that include theories establishing the basis for international trade and behavior of exchange rates. Protectionist policies of government include quotas, tariffs and excise taxes are also reviewed. Offered Term Four. Four semester hours.

BADM 361. Principles of Management - A study of the basic principles of management. Also considered are decision-making and the fundamental function of management, planning, organizing, actuating, controlling, and applying the process of management to selected areas. Studies of individual firms are discussed. Offered every term. Three semester hours.

BADM 362. Human Resource Management - A study of the principles and policies governing employer-employee relationships and a consideration of the problems and practices of hiring, supervising, and terminating workers. Prerequisite: BADM 361 or permission of the instructor. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

BADM 362B. Human Resource Management - A study of the principles and policies governing employer-employee relationships and a consideration of the problems and practices of hiring, supervising, and terminating workers. Offered Term Four. Four semester hours.

BADM 363B. Organizational Leadership - An introduction to leadership in both public sector and non-profit organizational settings with a focus on developing skills for effective leadership. This course examines the behaviors of leaders in today’s organizations by studying the concept of servant leadership, as well as current leadership theories. Course components emphasize analysis, critical thinking, skill development, and application of leadership principles, which will help students formulate how they may apply the various leadership theories in their personal and professional lives. Students use readings, behavior modeling, experiential exercises, self-reflection, and interviews with existing leaders in the workplace to optimize their own leadership capabilities in handling real world, day-to-day leadership functions. Offered Term One. Four semester hours.

BADM 365. Operations Management - A course designed to provide the student with a broad conceptual framework for the management of operations in today’s competitive, global environment. This course emphasizes the strategic importance of operations decisions and how all functions within an organization interrelate. Specific attention is placed on developing a competitive operations strategy, decision-making, TQM, process management, and the use of technology to create new products and improve processes. Using case analysis and simulations, students develop a deeper understanding of realistic business issues and learn to apply the concepts presented in the text. Prerequisites: BADM 361 and ECON 201. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

BADM 365B. Operations Management - A course designed to provide the student with a broad conceptual framework for the management of operations in today’s competitive, global environment.  This course emphasizes the strategic importance of operations decisions and how all functions within an organization interrelate.  Specific attention is placed on developing a competitive operations strategy, decision-making, TQM, process management, and the use of technology to create new products and improve processes.  Using case analysis and simulations, students develop a deeper understanding of realistic business issues and learn to apply the concepts presented in the text. Offered Term Three. Four semester hours.

BADM 365M. Operations Management - A course designed to provide the student with a broad conceptual framework for the management of operations in today’s competitive, global environment. This course emphasizes the strategic importance of operations decisions and how all functions within an organization interrelate. Specific attention is placed on developing a competitive operations strategy, decision-making, TQM, process management, and the use of technology to create new products and improve processes. Using case analysis and simulations, students develop a deeper understanding of realistic business issues and learn to apply the concepts presented in the text.  Three semester hours.

BADM 375. Small Business Management - A study of the concepts and theories that will help the student create, manage, and gain profit from a small business. A computer simulation in which the students start and run their own small businesses is an integral part of the course. Prerequisite: BADM Administration 361. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

BADM 380. Introduction to Health Care Administration - An introduction to various aspects of health care administration, including an overview of the health care delivery system in the United States and the various components and services within the health care industry. Guest lecturers from various health care agencies provide students with information about their professions. Offered fall term even years. Three semester hours.

BADM 382. Sports Marketing - A course designed to provide students with an in-depth knowledge of the strategies and techniques used when promoting and marketing sports. Students will develop promotional strategies associated with real life sport organizations in an effort to understand the unique marketing needs of the sports product. Prerequisite: BADM 210. Cross-listed as HPXS 382. Offered spring term each year. Two semester hours.

BADM 383. Sports Finance - A course designed to provide the student with an understanding of various aspects of sports finance including financial budget, analysis, management, and planning. Internal development through fund raising in both the sports and recreation industries will also be covered. Application of course material will be emphasized through project based assignments. Prerequisite BADM 210. Cross-listed as HPXS 383. Offered fall term each year. Two semester hours.

BADM 384. Sports Facilities – A course designed to provide the student with an understanding of the various techniques/theories of athletic facility management and facility design. This course will include traditional classroom presentations, various assigned readings, and facility tours. Prerequisite BADM 210. Offered spring term each year. Two semester hours.

BADM 385. Professional and Personal Development - A course designed to provide the student with an understanding of effective professional and personal behavior in an organization. The course focuses on understanding the behavior of workers and managers in an organizational environment, developing effective communication styles, working in a team environment, handling power and politics in an organization, understanding change, conflict and creativity, and developing and reaching personal goals. Using personal assessments, skill building exercises, and case analysis, students build the interpersonal skills required for successful interaction within the business environment. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

BADM 386. Sports Law and Ethics – A course designed to provide the student an overview of legal and ethical issues encountered in both amateur and professional sports in the areas of contracts, torts, antitrust, labor, and agency law. Students will explore both the legal and ethical dimensions of contemporary issues in sports while considering relevant case law, statutory law, and scripture. Offered fall term odd years. Two semester hours

BADM 390. Global Business Management and Strategy - A course designed to cover the major topics normally offered in a course in international business management and strategy as well as more in-depth coverage of such areas as international corporate finance, human resource management, and strategy. It also has a very important function of enabling the integration of field experiences, corporate visits, and presentations by guest faculty with the current theoretical developments and literature in this field. Offered summer term each year as part of IBI program. Three semester hours.

BADM 401B. Principles of Management - An introductory course examining the role of the manager in modern business. This course examines the changing paradigm of managing people in today’s diverse environment. Among the topics discussed are the evolution of management thought, paradigm shifts required in today’s business environment, factors affecting decision-making, ethics/social responsibility, and the functions of management. This course focuses on applying management concepts to a variety of management situations. Offered Term Two. Four semester hours.

BADM 418. Marketing Management – A course that applies marketing principles, practices, and theories to the formulation of strategic marketing plans and solutions for U.S. and global markets. It also builds analytical skills in diagnosing marketing problems, identifying opportunities, analyzing alternative courses of action, and recommending marketing strategies and action plans. Emphasis is placed on decision-making, financial and ethical analysis, and individual and team assignments. Prerequisites: BADM 315, BADM 304, and BADM 317 or BADM 318. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

BADM 420B. Cases in Business Ethics - Using case studies and online discussions, this course emphasizes both the philosophical foundations of ethical conduct and the practical problems encountered in the day-to-day conduct of business affairs. Offered Term Four. One semester hour.

BADM 421. Business Ethics - A study of theoretical and practical problems of moral conduct in the field of business. The course emphasizes both the philosophical foundations of ethical conduct and the practical problems encountered in the day-to-day conduct of business affairs. Much of the study of practical problems centers around actual case studies. Although there are no specific prerequisites, this course should generally be taken only after a number of other business administration courses have been completed. Offered every term. Three semester hours.

BADM 470. Business Strategy - An integrated study of the functional areas of finance, marketing, and management with emphasis on case analysis, readings, and computer simulations. Prerequisites: BADM 315 and 361 and ECON 301. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

BADM 470B. Business Strategy - An integrated study of the functional areas of finance, marketing, and management through a series of readings, lectures, and case analyses. This study of corporate and business level policy and strategy making is developed using a top management perspective. A comprehensive final project requiring significant research and case analysis is presented at the conclusion of the course. Prerequisites: BADM 315B, 401B, and ECON 301B. It is strongly suggested that students complete all other courses in the major prior to Business Strategy as this capstone course integrates the entire curriculum. Offered Term Four. Four semester hours.

BADM 480. Long-Term Care Administration - A study of the principles and applications of long-term care administration, including general management, environmental management, patient care, personnel management, and government regulations. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

BADM 481. Policies and Issues in Health Care - A focus on the application of analytical skills of policy formation in the health professions. The course focuses on analyzing the processes in the design, adoption, implementation, and evaluation of current health policy. Recent political and ethical issues relating to health care policy are examined. Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours.

BADM 491. Internship - A practicum experience which involves the student in a position in business under adequate supervision for the joint purposes of learning about business and possible occupational choices. Prerequisite: consent of major professor. One to six semester hours.

BADM 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from semester to semester. One to three semester hours.

BADM 499A. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students craft a research proposal, prepare a literature review, and outline the methods by which they plan to conduct research. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

BADM 499B. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students complete their research in a manner consistent with practices in their discipline and submit a written draft of their findings to their mentor. Offered every semester as needed.  One semester hour.

BADM 499C. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students revise their research and present their findings publicly. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

BADM 517. Marketing Strategy - This course examines the development of marketing strategy at the business unit level and its connection with corporate strategy. Emphasis is given to opportunity analysis, competitive evaluation, and marketing strategy design and revision. Three semester hours.

BADM 524. Analytical Decision-Making - A focus on the analysis of information gathered both internally and externally. Topics addressed include both the statistical analysis used in the decision-making processes at the managerial level as well as the constrained optimization techniques required in managerial economics. Three semester hours.

BADM 525. Administration of Healthcare Organizations – An examination of the U.S. healthcare system including an exploration of managing a staff of professional medical providers; effective navigation of government interventions such as Medicare, Medicaid, and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; and comparisons with other healthcare delivery systems in developed countries. Three semester hours.

BADM 526. Administration of Healthcare Finance – An examination of payment systems; reimbursement policies; third-party billing; for-profit vs. not-for-profit status; medical coding and billing systems. Three semester hours.

BADM 527. Management of Regulatory Compliance within Healthcare Organizations – An examination of the laws and regulations from The Joint Commission and other key regulatory agencies. Emphasis is placed on strategies to effectively design and maintain a compliance program within a healthcare organization. Three semester hours.

BADM 528. Supply Chain Management – A study of the activities involved in moving materials and information through each firm from the raw material stage to delivery of the final product to the consumer. Some steps in this process include transportation, warehousing, inventory control, and information management. The course places special emphasis on the interrelated nature of the functional areas of business and the role that a holistic management approach plays in the development of an effective and resilient supply chain in an era of increasingly global competition. Three semester hours.

BADM 530. Management and Leadership - This course examines current issues in leadership and appropriate strategies for implementing planned change. The course integrates materials from both micro and macro approaches to leadership and looks at the differences between managers and leaders, the leader-member exchange process, the leader’s role in setting the strategic direction of an organization, and the ethical, moral and professional issues of leadership with emphasis on developing a biblical foundation of leadership. Three semester hours.

BADM 531. Leading and Communicating in Global and Diverse Contexts – An exploration of best practices in understanding and maximizing human interaction in global and diverse contexts. Effective communication for various leadership roles is examined including interpersonal, small group, organizational, and public situations. Skills to develop intercultural competence and evaluating communication barriers that prevent the understanding of a leader’s message are explored. Three semester hours.

BADM 532. Leading Organizational Change – An examination of the forces that drive organizations to change and the role of innovation and creativity in change efforts. Literature and best practices related to the emerging roles of the leader as an agent of change are examined. Also examined are forces for change, diagnosis for change, visioning, resistance to change, and consolidating change. Three semester hours.

BADM 535. Managing Human Resources – An in-depth study of human resource management and a strategic overview of the essential knowledge required to manage a firm’s human resources effectively including both interpersonal and quantitative skills. It explores human resources within various structures and with different job, skill, and behavioral requirements. Emphasis is given to the ethical  behavior by managers as they enforce standards throughout the organization and the strategic integration of human resource functions within the context of a firm’s task environment. Three semester hours.

BADM 541. Business Ethics from a Christian Perspective - This course examines the moral, ethical, social, and spiritual aspects of the practice of business. Students will explore the relationship between Christianity and commerce and the role of character in leadership and ethical decision making.. Three semester hours.

BADM 544. Strategic Management - An examination of policymaking and strategic management in  organizations while integrating and applying the work  of the core curriculum. Students will develop a mastery of a body of qualitative and quantitative analytical tools with which to analyze industries and competitors, identify and predict competitive behavior, develop and sustain competitive advantage, and make ethical strategic decisions. Students will participate in a simulation that will allow them to apply this body of knowledge while making strategic decisions for a simulated company. The deliverable for this course will be a presentation that demonstrates integration, application, and mastery of the Master of Business Administration program content. Five semester hours.

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CHEMISTRY

CHEM 150. Chemistry and Society - A one-semester chemistry course which focuses upon chemistry in the context of every day experiences. Topics such as alternative fuels, plastics and polymers, nutrition, genetic engineering, and acid rain will be discussed within the context of their social, political, and ethical implications. The underlying chemical principles will be included on a need-to-know basis to help students develop critical thinking skills in the area of consumer chemistry. Not applicable toward a chemistry major or minor unless by consent of the Chair of Scientific Learning. Three-hour lecture and two-hour laboratory weekly. Offered fall term each year. Four semester hours.

CHEM 151. Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry - A one-semester survey of organic chemistry, including structure and nomenclature, functional groups, functional group reactivity, biologically important molecules, and introduction to human metabolism and nutrition. Not applicable toward a chemistry major or minor unless by consent of the Chair of Scientific Learning. Prerequisite: CHEM 150, 170, or consent of the instructor. Three hours lecture, one-hour recitation, and one two-hour laboratory weekly. Offered spring term each year. Four semester hours.

CHEM 170-171. General Chemistry - A study of the principles of general chemistry including atomic/molecular structure, bonding, stoichiometry, equilibria, kinetics and descriptive chemistry of the elements. Laboratory work includes basic laboratory techniques and Qualitative Analysis during the second semester. Prerequisite: algebra, high school chemistry or CHEM 150, or consent of the instructor. Students wishing to take this course to fill the laboratory science general education requirement must have the consent of the instructor. Three hours lecture, one hour of recitation, and one three-hour laboratory weekly. CHEM 170 and 171 are offered as a year sequence beginning in the fall term each year. Four semester hours each semester.

CHEM 202. Quantitative Analysis - A course including representative types of gravimetric and volumetric analysis and a study of the techniques and fundamental principles of analytical chemistry and the stoichiometric problems. Offered fall term odd years. Four semester hours.

CHEM 203. Instrumental Analysis - An introduction to the theory and application of electrometric, spectrometric, and chromatographic methods of analysis. Prerequisite: CHEM 170 and 171 or consent of the instructor. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory weekly. Offered spring term odd years. Four semester hours.

CHEM 301. Organic Chemistry I - A study of the structure, nomenclature, and reactivity of organic compounds, aliphatic and aromatic. Prerequisite: CHEM 171. Three hours lecture and one hour session on molecular modeling per week. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

CHEM 302. Organic Chemistry II - A continued study of the structure, nomenclature, preparation, and reactivity of organic compounds, aliphatic and aromatic, with the addition of spectroscopic techniques and functional group analysis. Prerequisite: CHEM 301. Three hours lecture and two three-hour labs per week. Offered spring term each year. Five semester hours.

CHEM 310. Biochemistry - A comprehensive study of the chemical process taking place in living cells with special emphasis on metabolism and related chemical principles. Prerequisites: CHEM 301 and 302 or the consent of the instructor. Offered fall term each year. Five semester hours.

CHEM 311. Organic Qualitative Analysis - A course in the standard methods of identification of organic compounds. Prerequisite: CHEM 302 or concurrent enrollment. Offered  as needed. Three or four semester hours.

CHEM 401. Physical Chemistry - The study of the Laws of Thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and chemical kinetics.  Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Offered as needed. Four semester hours.

CHEM 402. Quantum Chemistry - The study of aspects of modern quantum theory including the Schrodinger Equation, Huckel Molecular Orbital Theory, and atomic structure relating to chemical reactivity. Prerequisites: CHEM 302, PHYS 204, and MATH 211 and  212. MATH 307 Linear Algebra is recommended but not required; CHEM 401 is NOT a prerequisite. Offered as needed. Four semester hours.

CHEM 405. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry - Modern bonding theories are presented and applied to inorganic compounds, especially to coordination compounds. The effects of structure and bonding on chemical properties are explored. Prerequisite: CHEM 202 or concurrent enrollment. Three hours lecture.  Offered as needed. Three semester hours.

CHEM 405L Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory – A laboratory to support CHEM 405 content for the student interested in carrying out the synthesis and characterization of coordination compounds. Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in CHEM 405 or successful completion of CHEM 405. Offered as needed.  One to two 3-hour labs weekly. One to two semester hours.

CHEM 490. Research Problem - Research on special problems in chemistry under the direct supervision of an instructor. Prerequisites: twenty hours of chemistry and consent of the faculty member to direct the research problem. Offered as needed. One to four semester hours.

CHEM 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in the regular course offerings. Topics vary from semester to semester. One to three semester hours.

CHEM 499A. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students craft a research proposal, prepare a literature review, and outline the methods by which they plan to conduct research. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

CHEM 499B. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students complete their research in a manner consistent with practices in their discipline and submit a written draft of their findings to their mentor. Offered every semester as needed.  One semester hour.

CHEM 499C. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students revise their research and present their findings publicly. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

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CHRISTIAN MINISTRY

CMIN 217. Foundation for Youth and Children’s Ministry - A solid foundation in the nature and importance of the church’s ministry to youth and children. Emphases include the nature and mission of the church as well as the personal and professional life of the youth or children’s minister. Some field experience is included. Prerequisite: BIBL 123 and 124. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

CMIN 250. Practical Ministries Colloquium A - Part of a series of practically oriented discussions of ministry in its various forms, comprised primarily of guest speakers and small group discussions, focusing on missions, Christian unity, and church and government. Required for the Bible major. Offered fall term odd years. One-half hour per semester.

CMIN 251. Practical Ministries Colloquium B - Part of a series of very practically oriented discussions of ministry in its various forms, comprised primarily of guest speakers and small group discussions, focusing on evangelism and “marketing,” counseling, weddings, and funerals. Required for the Bible major. Offered spring term even years. One-half hour per semester.

CMIN 252. Practical Ministries Colloquium C - Part of a series of very practically oriented discussions of ministry in its various forms, comprised primarily of guest speakers and small group discussions, focusing on ministerial ethics, finances, and church administration. Required for the Bible major. Offered fall term even years. One-half hour per semester.

CMIN 253. Practical Ministries Colloquium D - Part of a series of very practically oriented discussions of ministry in its various forms, comprised primarily of guest speakers and small group discussions, focusing on worship, music, baptism, and communion. Required for the Bible major. Offered spring term odd years. One-half hour per semester.

CMIN 261. Introduction to Christian Education - A survey course introducing the student to the total program of Christian education in the local church. Principles, organization, curriculum, methods, leadership, and related matters are treated. Prerequisites: BIBL 123 and 124. Offered spring term even years. Two semester hours.

CMIN 265. Effective Christian Evangelism - A focus on current forms and styles of Christian evangelism, following a brief overview of New Testament scriptures about evangelism and some methods used in the past. Some attention is also given to personal efforts at sharing Christian faith. Prerequisites: BIBL 123 and 124. Offered periodically. Two semester hours.

CMIN 270. Introduction to Christian Missions - A study of the biblical and theological basis for missions, pointing out the implications of ecumenics, anthropology, and changing world conditions for present missionary practice. Prerequisites: BIBL 123 and 124. Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester hours.

CMIN 271. History of Christian Missions - A survey of the history and progress of missions since the beginning of Christianity. Same as HIST 271. Prerequisites: BIBL 123 and 124. Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester hours.

CMIN 273. Introduction to Ministry - A preliminary study of homiletics, church administration, worship leadership, ministerial ethics, and practical ministry (including attention to baptisms, weddings, funerals, etc.). Required for the Bible major. Prerequisites: COMM 102 and BIBL 123 and 124. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

CMIN 276. Homiletics - A continued study of the preparation and delivery of sermons, with considerable emphasis on student preaching and evaluation. Prerequisites: CMIN 273 and BIBL 123 and 124. Offered spring term even years. Two semester hours.

CMIN 317. Materials and Methods of Children’s Ministries - A study of models and resources for ministering to children in the church. Prerequisites: BIBL 123 and 124 and CMIN 217 or prior permission of instructor. Offered spring term odd years. Two semester hours.

CMIN 318. Materials and Methods of Youth Ministries - A study of the available models and resources for ministering to youth in the church. Prerequisites: BIBL 123 and 124 and CMIN 217 or prior permission of instructor. Offered spring term odd years. Two semester hours.

CMIN 365. Christian Worship - A study focused on the leadership of Christian worship in a public context, including both practical and theological considerations. Some attention is given to planning and coordinating the various facets of a public service. Guest speakers and possible field trips are included. Prerequisites: BIBL 123 and 124. Offered fall term alternate years. Three semester hours.

CMIN 375. Narrative and Story-Telling - The study and practice of developing and using stories and other narrative forms to communicate biblical truth. Exercises involve the application of narrative materials to both sermon and lesson formats. Attention is given to using literary narrative materials as well as creating stories from one’s own experience and observations. Prerequisites: BIBL 123 and 124. Offered periodically. Two semester hours.

CMIN 430. Servanthood in the Third Millennium - An examination of the nature of servanthood and the formation of the servant of Christ for the world. Topics include identity of the servant, spiritual formation, the role of community, the servant and culture, preparation for service, and serving across cultural lines. Prerequisites: BIBL 123 and 124. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

CMIN 440. Transforming Church Leadership - A study of the nature of leadership with specific application to the local church. Examines the foundational teachings and primary metaphors of leadership in the Bible and helps students develop a theologically informed perspective on leadership. Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours.

CMIN 470. Current Issues in World Mission - A study of important movements and trends within the field of world mission. Topics of discussion include models of ministry, leadership and missions, the internationalization of mission, and mission to North America. Prerequisites: BIBL 123 and 124. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

CMIN 491. Practicum in Ministry - Involvement in ministry either in a local congregation or a mission field outside the United States with approved supervision and evaluation. Arrangements are to be made through the Supervisor of Bible internships. Two semester hours. Note: This requirement is normally met during a term of not less than eight weeks during the summer following the junior year at a location other than the student’s home area.

CMIN 491. Practicum in Missions - Involvement in ministry on a mission field with approved supervision and evaluation. Arrangements are made through the missions professor. Three semester hours. Note: This requirement is normally met during a term of not less than eight weeks during the summer following the junior year.

CMIN 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in the regular course offerings. Not offered every year. One to three semester hours.

CMIN 499A. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students craft a research proposal, prepare a literature review, and outline the methods by which they plan to conduct research. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

CMIN 499B. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students complete their research in a manner consistent with practices in their discipline and submit a written draft of their findings to their mentor. Offered every semester as needed.  One semester hour.

CMIN 499C. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students revise their research and present their findings publicly. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

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COMMUNICATIONS

COMM 101. Popular Culture, Mass Media, and Religion - A foundational course designed to raise questions and issues about the interplay between mass media, faith, and culture. The emphasis of this course is on analyzing, from a Christian perspective, the relationship between and impact of media content, media use, individuals, belief systems, and societies. Offered fall term. Three semester hours.

COMM 102. Speech Communication - A study of the basic principles of interpersonal, small-group, and public communication with emphasis on public speaking. Exercises in each area focus attention on individual needs and skills. Offered every term. Three semester hours.

COMM 103. Public Speaking – A study of the basic principles of interpersonal, small-group, and public communication with emphasis on public speaking. Exercises in each area focus attention on individual needs and skills. Course offering to be announced. Two semester hours.

COMM 141. Fundamentals of Voice/Stage Movement - A survey course introducing the student to major vocal production and stage movement theorists as well as an introduction to stage dialects and stage combat. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

COMM 151. Introduction to Theatre - The history and literature of the theatre from its Greek origins to the present. This course is designed to help the student relate drama in its historical context to contemporary man. Some emphasis is also placed on musical theatre. The course is supplemented by films, attendance at area performances, and production work on the current semester’s drama production. Cross-listed as THEA 151. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

COMM 180. Introduction to Storytelling – A course in which students become aware of their own potential as storytellers and the power of storytelling in their lives and professions. Storytelling literature and history of storytelling are surveyed, but the practice of telling stories orally receives the major emphasis. Students begin the development of their own personal style and develop a repertoire of stories. Course offering to be announced. Three semester hours.

COMM 184. Radio Lab - An opportunity for students to work with their campus FM radio station, WUMC 90.5. Students perform a variety of tasks from administrative duties and creating promotional announcements to on-air board shifts. The station streams its signal online so friends and family can listen to student-produced programming. Non-communications majors are encouraged to enroll in this lab. Students may take this course repeatedly and accumulate credit hours. Offered every term. One to three semester hours.

COMM 195. Seminar – A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, writing, and concentration in areas beyond regular course offerings. Topics vary from term to term. Course offering to be announced. One to three semester hours.

COMM 201. Principles of Interpersonal Communication - An introduction to the processes and dynamics of human interaction, both in face-to-face settings and in small groups. The study includes both verbal and non-verbal forms of communication as well as material related to symbolic interaction. Offered every term. Three semester hours.

COMM 205. Multimedia Reporting and Writing - An introduction to and practice in the fundamentals of journalistic reporting and writing for a variety of print, online, and broadcast media. Proficiency in composition is a prerequisite. The course focuses on story development, research and interviewing techniques, writing styles for various media, and legal and ethical matters. A weekly lab provides instruction in the use of technology as well as skill building in reporting and writing. Offered every term. Four semester hours.

COMM 237. Basic Photography - Introductory course in traditional black and white photography including composition, exposure, camera operations, and basic darkroom techniques. Offered every term. Cross-listed as ART 237. Three semester hours.

COMM 242. Fundamentals of Acting - A study of techniques in acting. Class exercises are designed to develop relaxation, concentration, and improvisation skills. Audition techniques, monologue studies, and scene study are also emphasized. Cross-listed as THEA 242. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

COMM 270. Film and Television Aesthetics - An introduction to the artistic elements of the motion picture. The detailed analysis of basic film techniques and how they might be creatively manipulated for expressive effect are combined with the screening of films appropriate to class discussion. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

COMM 275. Writing for the Stage and Screen A studio course in writing for film or for the theatre. Students learn the basics principles of dramatic writing. Students study examples of dramatic writing, compose a critical paper on the film or stage play of their choice, and create an original short script. This course fulfills the screenwriting credit that is prerequisite for all production courses in the film program, and film students may develop scripts that can be produced in subsequent filmmaking courses. The course is offered as an elective for theatre and creative writing students. Cross listed as THEA 275. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

COMM 280. Media Effects on Children and Adolescents - A seminar course in media literacy with an emphasis on the psychological, social, and educational effects on children and adolescents. The course includes discussion of the evolving nature of media and laws governing them. Such media include television, movies, the Internet, newspapers, magazines, music, and interactive video games. Discussion and assignments focus on the relative impact of these media on things such as body image, drug and alcohol use, sexuality, sociability, morality, and cognitive development. An emphasis is placed on becoming a media literacy advocate within one’s own family, school, and community. Cross-listed as PSYC 280. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours.

COMM 284. Digital Audio Production - A study of the processing techniques dealing with both live and recorded sound. Primary emphasis is upon the manipulation of that sound for radio broadcast, although consideration is given to live and studio recording. Content includes the understanding of the physical aspects of the creation of sound, proper use of microphones, sound mixing, as well as principles and techniques of recording and play back. Vocal sound production for speech and fundamentals of announcing are also covered. Course offering to be announced. Three semester hours.

COMM 285. Multimedia Publishing: The Buffalo - As part of a team, students will plan, create, and publish the Buffalo annual (or “yearbook”) in the form of a magazine and Web site. The project will involve writing, photography, videography, graphic design, print publication, Web site design and development (including social networking and other interactive media), publicity, and advertising sales. This course may be taken multiple times for up to 6 hours of credit. Open to all interested students. This course is recommended as a two-semester (fall-spring) experience. Offered every term. One to three semester hours.

COMM 287. Digital Photography I - A study of the concepts and practices of effective digital photography; examining the terminology, resources and techniques used in capturing, processing and enhancing digital images. Cross-listed as ART 287. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

COMM 295. Seminar – A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, writing, and concentration in areas beyond regular course offerings. Topics vary from term to term. Course offering to be announced. One to three semester hours.

COMM 310. Intermediate Photography - An opportunity for students to expand their understanding of techniques and ideas presented in Basic Photography. Emphasis is placed on personal interpretation and visual communication. Prerequisite: COMM 237. Cross-listed as ART 310. Offered every term. Three semester hours.

COMM 311. Public Relations Strategies - An introduction to the public relations process and industry, including a survey of tasks that are performed by every public relations practitioner. Emphasis is on the role of public relations within the media system as well as in the American social and political economy. Prerequisite: COMM 205 or consent of the instructor. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

COMM 311M. Public Relations Strategies - An introduction to the public relations process and industry, including a survey of tasks that are performed by every public relations practitioner. Emphasis is on the role of public relations within the media system as well as in the American social and political economy. Prerequisite: COMM 205 or consent of the instructor. Three semester hours.

COMM 312. Introduction to Color Photography - An introduction to basic color photographic materials and techniques.  Students are introduced to exposure, lighting, developing and printing processes as they relate to the world of color photography.  The aesthetics of color photography will be emphasized throughout the semester in hands-on printing sessions, critiques, and discussions. Students develop a better understanding and appreciation of the differences between black and white and color photography. Cross listed as ART 312. Prerequisites: COMM 237 and 310. Offered each fall term. Three semester hours.

COMM 313. Desktop Publishing: Layout and Design - A course designed to give students practice and experience with the leading software programs to create professional-looking publications including postcards, advertisements, letterhead, business cards, logo designs, etc. Publication design concepts and theories are discussed. Other skills learned in this course include scanning, graphic editing, and digital camera basics. Prerequisite: CIS 120, CIS 125, CIS 130 or consent of instructor. Rotating years offered both terms one year, then spring term only. Three semester hours.

COMM 316. The Press in Society - A study of the history and development of news and news media and their role and impact in modern societies. The course will examine cultural, religious, political, technological, and economic interactions between “the press” and the societies in which they operate, paying particular attention to the United States. Cross listed as HIST 316. Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours.

COMM 323. Digital Video Production and Editing - An introduction to the process of creating digital video media, whether for “limited” in-house use, web use, CD/DVD use, or for broadcast purposes. The course provides an orientation to professional digital video procedures and equipment essential for quality field and studio productions. Students learn to use leading video-editing software on state of the art MAC workstations configured for multimedia development and design. Prerequisites: CIS 120, CIS 125, CIS 130, COMM 270, and COMM 313 or consent of the instructor. Offered every term. Three semester hours.

COMM 324. Multimedia Journalism Practicum (Wired) - An opportunity for students to reinforce journalistic theory and practice as part of a team whose goal is to produce a quality thirty-minute weekly program which airs on the campus internal cable channel 97. The show is posted weekly on the Communications Website and on iTunes. Students have the opportunity to research, report, write, anchor, edit, direct, technically direct, produce, and serve as videographers, audio technicians, and studio and field camera operators to produce these programs. Students may take this course repeatedly and accumulate credit hours. This course (and/or COMM 325) is required in the Communications major (Multimedia Journalism emphasis) and the Multimedia Journalism minor. As part of a multimedia environment, students will occasionally work with students in COMM 325 (Multimedia Journalism Practicum (Stampede). Prerequisites: COMM 205 and 323 or consent of the instructor. Offered every term. One to three semester hours.

COMM 325. Multimedia Journalism Practicum (Stampede) - An opportunity for students to use and reinforce journalistic theory and practice as part of a team whose goal is to produce a high-quality newspaper and Web-based news site, The Stampede. Students will plan, report, write, edit, and publish regular issues of The Stampede online and in print. Students may take this course repeatedly and accumulate credit hours. This course (and/or COMM 324) is required in the Communications major (multimedia journalism emphasis) and the multimedia journalism minor. As part of a multimedia environment, students will occasionally work with students in COMM 324 Multimedia Journalism Practicum: (Wired). Prerequisites: COMM 205 and 323 or consent of the instructor. Offered every term. One to three credit hours.

COMM 331. Advanced Reporting – Students will explore and apply intermediate-level reporting and writing techniques for various media forms, including opportunities to report in specialty areas (“beats”). Prerequisite: COMM 205. Offered fall term even years. Three semester hours

COMM 335. Editing and Style - A survey of the fundamentals of editing, style, layout, and production in various media formats. Lab work with The Stampede is required. Prerequisite: COMM 205 or consent of instructor. Cross listed as ENGL 335. Offered fall term odd years. Three semester hours.

COMM 337. Photojournalism - An examination of photojournalism designed to help students realize the potential of photography as a powerful means of visual communication.  This course will cover technical and visual skills, as well as history, traditions, viewpoints, legal and ethical issues, and the role of the modern photojournalist in today’s changing world.  Guest photojournalists will share their experiences with the class throughout the semester. Prerequisite: COMM 237. Cross listed as ART 337. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

COMM 340. Fundamentals of Directing - A course emphasizing study of the various elements in the production of a play or a short film: theory, selection of play or screenplay, production, interpretation of the play or film, scene design, costumes, and make-up. The course culminates in the direction of a one-act play or short film for the public. This course is especially recommended for students preparing to supervise play or film production in the public schools. Prerequisites: COMM 270 and 323. Cross listed as THEA 340. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

COMM 341. Principles of Organizational Communication - An overview of organizational communication and the role that it plays in the American system. Attention is given to the nature of leadership, organizational structure in business and industry, and the role of communication in the process by which complex tasks are carried out. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

COMM 345. Dynamics of Group Communication - The study of how groups and collectivities of people organize and maintain themselves. The course includes a study of theories in group dynamics as well as an examination of why groups sometimes fail. Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours.

COMM 350. Rhetoric: The Art of Persuasion - An exploration of the fundamental features of rhetoric primarily using classical Greek and Roman theory. That theory is applied to modern attempts to persuade, but also the use of emotion, character, and style. Students will analyze and evaluate speeches and texts. Offered spring semester odd years. Three semester hours.

COMM 371. History of Fiction Film - A survey of international narrative cinema, from the silent period to the present. Individual films, filmmakers, film movements, and film genres are studied, and important films from the respective periods are screened in whole or part. This course fulfills the ethnic studies course requirement in the general education core. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

COMM 372. History of Documentary Film - A survey of international non-fiction filmmaking from the silent period to the present, with a focus on individual documentary films, documentary filmmakers, documentary movements, and documentary genres. Class screenings introduce students to important and relevant examples of non-fiction cinema. Offered spring term during alternative years. Three semester hours.

COMM 373. History of Animated Film - An historical overview of motion picture animation, from the silent period to the present. Various animation techniques, animation styles, and animation artists are studied, and key examples of animated films from around the world are screened in class. Offered spring term during alternative years. Three semester hours.

COMM 375. Cinematography Workshop - A course in basic 16mm motion picture photography, lighting, sound, and editing for films produced on location or within a studio setting. Short films produced in this course may be entered in festival competition. A lab fee is required. Prerequisites: COMM 270, 275, and 323, or consent of instructor. Course offering to be announced. Three semester hours.

COMM 377. Animation Workshop - A course in basic motion picture and digital animation techniques. Short films produced in this course may be entered in festival competition. Prerequisites: COMM 270 and 275. Course offering to be announced. Three semester hours.

COMM 384. Digital Recording Techniques - A continuation of COMM 284 with a focus on obtaining sound in a studio or field environment, editing, and manipulation of recorded material for content and time considerations. Topics include microphone selection and placement, remote and studio recording procedures, creation and use of sound effects, and news documentaries. Prerequisite: COMM 284 or consent of the instructor. Course offering to be announced. Three semester hours.

COMM 387. Digital Photography II - An advanced study of the concepts and techniques presented in Digital Photography I allowing students the opportunity to extend their photographic skills in the digital medium.  Emphasis is placed on personal interpretation and advanced camera functions and techniques in image enhancement. Prerequisite: ART/COMM 287. Cross-listed as ART 387. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

COMM 395. Seminar – A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, writing, and concentration in areas beyond regular course offerings. Topics vary from term to term. Course offering to be announced. One to three semester hours.

COMM 400. Field Studies in Communications - A study tour to a selected city in the United States for the purpose of studying various aspects in the field of Communications. Communications faculty members arrange visits to various Communications-related companies/organizations. Specific readings are completed prior to the trip. Students are required to keep a journal of their experiences and submit a final paper, which reflects on those experiences. Offered spring term each year. One semester hour.

COMM 411. Public Relations Practices - An introduction to the specialty writing skills related to this industry, with an emphasis on developing a personal portfolio including a news release, feature article, public service announcements, brochure/flier, and emergency plan. Special attention is given to research, planning, writing, and distribution of public relations materials for all media, with additional discussion on emergency contingencies, social media, and interviewing. Prerequisite: COMM 205; COMM 311 highly recommended. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

COMM 431. Narrative Journalism - A practical course in researching and writing in-depth feature articles for newspapers and magazines, including a survey of trends in feature writing. Students will also have the opportunity to produce stories using video and/or audio media. Students submit their work for publication. Cross listed as ENGL 431. Prerequisite: COMM 205 or consent of instructor. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

COMM 432. Communications Law and Ethics - A course addressing major ethical and legal issues in various mass media, including the integration of Christian thinking and values with a career in the field. This course serves as the Communications core capstone course. Prerequisites: COMM 101, 201, 205, and 270, or consent of the instructor. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

COMM 451. Multimedia Production I: History, Theory, and Management - A survey of the history of digital media and the examination of current research on digital media trends. The pre-production phase of interactive multimedia program development is examined. Aspects of multimedia relating to Web, CD-/DVD authoring, animation, and virtual reality are covered. Attention is given to the legal and ethical issues associated with digital media. This course includes hands-on research and development of a client-based project. Students also complete their own on-line digital portfolio. Both the client project and the on-line portfolio are completed as part of COMM 452. Offered fall term even years. Three credit hours.

COMM 452. Multimedia Production II: Design and Production - A course continuation in which students complete development and design on a multimedia client project which began in COMM 451. Students learn how to integrate digital media content, such as audio, video, animation, and graphics to create an interactive multimedia client project. This course is a continuation of elements covered in COMM 451 and builds upon the student’s previous knowledge of graphic design, audio and video production, and photography. Projects created may cover training, educational, and commercial content. Students also revise their on-line portfolio. Prerequisites/Co-Requisites: COMM 287, 313, 318, 323, 451 and 456. Offered spring term odd years. Three credit hours.

COMM 456. Graphic Design - A study of design principles, theories, and skills as applied to print, video, and web-based publication and production, with an emphasis on conceptual thinking and problem-solving. Practical techniques are learned from conception to finished product. Students complete portfolio projects using both raster and vector-based design software. Students use state-of-the-art MAC workstations to complete projects. Recommended prerequisites: CIS 120, CIS 125, CIS 130, COMM 270 and COMM 287 or consent of instructor. Cross-listed as ART 456. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

COMM 470. Film and Television Criticism - A theoretical survey of the major literary, philosophical, ethical, and scientific approaches to motion picture analysis, perception, and understanding. Films that illustrate concepts discussed in class are screened. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

COMM 475. Senior Film Workshop (Directed Studies) - A studio course in independent short film production supervised by the film faculty. Students are required to enter the film produced in this course in festival competition. Pre-requisites: COMM 270, 275, and 375. Offered every term. Three semester hours.

COMM 481. Print Media Lab - A guided studies course in which students may receive course credit for advanced readings and special on-campus projects in print journalism. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Offered every term. One to three semester hours.

COMM 482. Visual Media Lab - A guided studies course in which students may receive course credit for advanced readings and special on-campus projects in television, video, film, and other visual media. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Course offering to be announced. One to three semester hours.

COMM 483. Public Relations Lab - A guided studies course in which students may receive course credit for advanced readings and special on-campus projects in public relations. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. Course offering to be announced. One to three semester hours.

COMM 485. Multimedia Lab - A guided studies course in which students may receive course credit for advanced readings and for the production of special on- or off-campus projects using multimedia development techniques. Prerequisite: consent of instructor. One to three semester hours.

COMM 489. Directed Readings - A supervised program of readings that provides for study of material not included in the regular course offerings. Course offering to be announced. One to three semester hours.

COMM 490. Directed Studies - A program of readings and conferences that provides for individualized study. Course offering to be announced. One to three semester hours.

COMM 491. Internship - A practicum experience in which students work in a professional setting using media skills from major courses, either in print, visual, digital or public relations media. Offered every term. Prerequisite: senior standing or consent of instructor. Three semester hours.

COMM 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, writing, and concentration in areas beyond regular course offerings. Topics vary from term to term. Course offering to be announced. One to three semester hours.

COMM 499A. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students craft a research proposal, prepare a literature review, and outline the methods by which they plan to conduct research. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

COMM 499B. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students complete their research in a manner consistent with practices in their discipline and submit a written draft of their findings to their mentor. Offered every semester as needed.  One semester hour.

COMM 499C. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students revise their research and present their findings publicly. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

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COMPOSITION

COMP 093. Writing Strategies for College Success - A course providing extra instruction for students who demonstrate writing skills below the college level. The course includes work in basic sentence structure, paragraph structure, and grammar. Students also practice organizing and developing essays. Not applicable toward the 128 hours required for a degree. Offered fall term each year. One semester hour.

COMP 145. Writing Proficiency – A course designed for students with prior composition credit whose score on the writing sample indicates a need for focused attention to specific areas of writing proficiency. The course is designed to increase student success in college level writing by addressing individual needs whether in basic skills, overall writing craft, or nuanced critical thinking. The quickly paced course requires students to demonstrate the ability to read critically and develop clear arguments. Students must achieve at least a C- in this course to demonstrate proficiency. Offered every term as needed. One semester hour.

COMP 111. Rhetorical Composition - Part of a two-semester sequence that prepares students to read, think, and write critically in preparation for work in all disciplines. The first semester of this writing-intensive course emphasizes the basics of effective rhetoric. Students focus on recognizing effective arguments, constructing effective arguments, and recognizing how various rhetorical situations shape the context of effective communication. Students must earn a C- or better in COMP 111 in order to advance to COMP 211 and to meet the writing requirements for graduation. Offered spring term each year . Three semester hours.

COMP 211. Inquiring Minds: Foundational Analytical Composition - Offered in the sophomore year, this course prepares students to read, think, and write critically in preparation for work in all disciplines. As the second semester of the writing-intensive general requirement, this course emphasizes more advanced analytical skills in multiple disciplines. Students build on the first semester’s rhetorical foundation by focusing on different citation styles, longer essays, and multi-faceted argumentation. Prerequisite: C- or better in COMP 111. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

COMP 499A. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students craft a research proposal, prepare a literature review, and outline the methods by which they plan to conduct research. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

COMP 499B. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students complete their research in a manner consistent with practices in their discipline and submit a written draft of their findings to their mentor. Offered every semester as needed.  One semester hour.

COMP 499C. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students revise their research and present their findings publicly. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

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COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS

CIS 120. Computer Applications: Microsoft Word/PowerPoint – A hands-on study of the Microsoft Word and Microsoft PowerPoint software. Topics include basic editing and formatting, tables and multipage reports, enhanced page layout and design, and desktop publishing. Also included are techniques for presentation development, slide layout with media, and special effects. Keyboarding skills are assumed. Offered fall and spring terms each year. One semester hour.

CIS 120M. Computer Applications: Microsoft Word/PowerPoint – A hands-on study of the Microsoft Word and Microsoft PowerPoint software. Topics include basic editing and formatting, tables and multipage reports, enhanced page layout and design, and desktop publishing. Also included are techniques for presentation development, slide layout with media, and special effects. Keyboarding skills are assumed. Offered fall, spring, and summer terms each year. One semester hour.

CIS 125. Computer Applications: Microsoft Excel – A hands-on study of Microsoft Excel software. Topics include formatting workbooks, calculating data with functions and formulas, and analyzing and charting financial data. Keyboarding skills are assumed. Offered fall and spring terms each year. One semester hour.

CIS 125M. Computer Applications: Microsoft Excel – A hands-on study of Microsoft Excel software. Topics include formatting workbooks, calculating data with functions and formulas, and analyzing and charting financial data. Keyboarding skills are assumed. Offered fall, spring, and summer terms each year. One semester hour.

CIS 130. Computer Applications: Microsoft Access – A hands-on study of Microsoft Access software. Topics include creating a database, defining table relationships, maintaining and querying a database, and creating forms and reports from databases. Keyboarding skills are assumed. Offered fall and spring terms each year. One semester hour.

CIS 130M. Computer Applications: Microsoft Access – A hands-on study of Microsoft Access software. Topics include creating a database, defining table relationships, maintaining and querying a database, and creating forms and reports from databases. Keyboarding skills are assumed. Offered fall, spring, and summer terms each year. One semester hour.

CIS 201. Hardware Fundamentals - A study in information systems hardware and microprocessors including hands-on experience with programming and system structure. The objective is to build a basic understanding of hardware configuration and how it interacts with system software. In conjunction with CIS 301, this course is directed toward the A+ certification exam. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

CIS 201M. Hardware Fundamentals - A study in information systems hardware and microprocessors including hands-on experience with programming and system structure. The objective is to build a basic understanding of hardware configuration and how it interacts with system software. In conjunction with CIS 301, this course is directed toward the A+ certification exam. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

CIS 211. Programming Logic - An introduction to all aspects of object-oriented logic and the problem-solving process.  Several high level languages are used with emphasis on good programming practices. Laboratory use of a computer is an integral part of the course. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

CIS 211M. Programming Logic - An introduction to all aspects of object-oriented logic and the problem-solving process. Several high level languages are used with emphasis on good programming practices. Laboratory use of a computer is an integral part of the course. Offered fall and summer terms. Three semester hours.

CIS 275B. Computer Applications - A study of the Windows environment and current Microsoft Office Suite applications. including word processing, spreadsheet, database, and presentation software with emphasis on their utilization in a business environment. Keyboarding skills are assumed. Offered Term One. Four semester hours.

CIS 297. Object Oriented Programming – A comprehensive course in application programming. Because of variations in course content, this course can be taken multiple times with permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: CIS 211. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

CIS 297M. Object Oriented Programming - A comprehensive course in application programming. Because of variations in course content, this course can be taken multiple times with permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: CIS 211M. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

CIS 301. Operating Systems – A survey of systems software and application software with an emphasis on how hardware and software interact. In conjunction with CIS 201, this course is directed toward the A+ certification exam. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

CIS 301M. Operating Systems – A survey of systems software and application software with an emphasis on how hardware and software interact. In conjunction with CIS 201M, this course is directed toward the A+ certification exam. Offered fall term even years and summer term odd years. Three semester hours.

CIS 305. Database Management - A basic overview of relational database systems and relational database design. The student acquires a working knowledge of Microsoft Access and the ISO standard SQL language. Prerequisite: CIS 130. Offered fall term odd years. Three semester hours.

CIS 305M. Database Management - A basic overview of relational database systems and relational database design. The student acquires a working knowledge of Microsoft Access and the ISO standard SQL language. Prerequisite: CIS 130M. Offered fall term odd years and summer term even years. Three semester hours.

CIS 310. Enterprise Resource Planning – A study of business functions and processes, marketing information systems, supply chain management information systems, process modeling and improvement, and electronic commerce. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

CIS 310M. Enterprise Resource Planning – A study of business functions and processes, marketing information systems, supply chain management information systems, process modeling and improvement, and electronic commerce. Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours.

CIS 318. Web Theory and Design - An introduction to the World Wide Web as both a user and a developer. This course is designed to take the user from creating web pages to designing a large Web site. Emphasis is on web design strategies and the use of existing software applications that generate web-ready code. Other topics include HTML and multi-media integration. Offered spring term each year. Three credit hours.

CIS 318M. Web Theory and Design - An introduction to the World Wide Web as both a user and a developer. This course is designed to take the user from creating web pages to designing a large Web site. Emphasis is on web design strategies and the use of existing software applications that generate web-ready code. Other topics include HTML and multi-media integration. Offered spring term each year and summer term odd years. Three credit hours.

CIS 341. Systems Analysis and Design - A study of systems analysis, design, and implementation methods commonly used in systems development. The course provides an overview of the system development life cycle and in-depth coverage of the analysis phase of the life cycle. Prerequisite: CIS 211 or 297. Offered fall term even years. Three semester hours.

CIS 341M. Systems Analysis and Design - A study of systems analysis, design, and implementation methods commonly used in systems development. The course provides an overview of the system development life cycle and in-depth coverage of the analysis phase of the life cycle. Prerequisite: CIS 211 or 297. Offered fall term even years and summer term odd years. Three semester hours.

CIS 410. Server Administration – A course preparing students to the administrator role of current Windows Server, Active Directory, server resources for clients, configuration and management of printer services, network services, data storage, and remove access for clients. Topics also include virtual servers, implementing strong security, and development of a reliable server environment. Offered fall term even years. Three semester hours.

CIS 410M. Server Administration – A course preparing students to the administrator role of current Windows Server, Active Directory, server resources for clients, configuration and management of printer services, network services, data storage, and remove access for clients. Topics also include virtual servers, implementing strong security, and development of a reliable server environment. Offered fall term odd years. Three semester hours.

CIS 411. Server Infrastructure – A focus on network infrastructure and administration for current Windows Server edition. Topics covered include in-depth knowledge of Windows Server, TCP/IP networking, Domain Name System, Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP), Active Directory, Domain Services, File Services, Printers and Print Services, Network Policy, and Access Services. Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours.

CIS 411M. Server Infrastructure – A focus on network infrastructure and administration for current Windows Server edition. Topics covered include in-depth knowledge of Windows Server, TCP/IP networking, Domain Name System, Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP), Active Directory, Domain Services, File Services, Printers and Print Services, Network Policy, and Access Services. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

CIS 420. Networking and Communication - An introduction to data transmission concepts and techniques. Topics included are: transmission media, analog and digital signals, data transmissions, multiplexing, network topologies, data security, Ethernet, token rings, and wide area network protocol. Prerequisite: CIS 211. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

CIS 420M. Data Communication and Networking - An introduction to data transmission concepts and techniques. Topics included are: transmission media, analog and digital signals, data transmissions, multiplexing, network topologies, data security, Ethernet, token rings, and wide area network protocol. Prerequisite: CIS 211. Offered spring term each year and summer term even years. Three semester hours.

CIS 441. Information Systems Software - A survey of systems software and application software with an emphasis on how hardware and software interact. In conjunction with course CIS 201, this course is directed toward the A+ certification exam. This course serves as a substitute when CIS 491 is not available. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

CIS 441M. Information Systems Software - A survey of systems software and application software with an emphasis on how hardware and software interact. In conjunction with course CIS 201M, this course is directed toward the A+ certification exam. This course serves as a substitute when CIS 491M is not available. Offered fall term even years and summer term odd years. Three semester hours.

CIS 450. Software Engineering - The senior capstone course in which students incorporate all aspects of previous study in computer information systems such as computer applications, programming, systems analysis, project management, and data communication to solve a real-life business problem. Open to senior computer information system and computer science majors only or by permission of the instructor. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

CIS 450M. Software Engineering - The senior capstone course in which students incorporate all aspects of previous study in computer information systems such as computer applications, programming, systems analysis, project management, and data communication to solve a real-life business problem. Open to senior computer information system and computer science majors only or by permission of the instructor. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

CIS 491. Internship - A practicum experience in which students work in a professional setting using computer information systems skills from their major courses. Prerequisite: consent of major professor. Offered every term. One to six semester hours.

CIS 491M. Internship – A practicum experience in which students work in a professional setting using computer information systems skills from their major courses.  Prerequisite: consent of major professor. Offered every term. One to six semester hours.

CIS 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor or major professor. Offered spring term odd years. One to three semester hours.

CIS 495M. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor or major professor. Offered spring term odd years. One to three semester hours.

CIS 499A. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students craft a research proposal, prepare a literature review, and outline the methods by which they plan to conduct research. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

CIS 499B. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students complete their research in a manner consistent with practices in their discipline and submit a written draft of their findings to their mentor. Offered every semester as needed.  One semester hour.

CIS 499C. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students revise their research and present their findings publicly. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

CIS 520. Information Management - A course focusing on the management of information technology assets within an organization. The role of the manager in assessing, implementing, and controlling information technology and the handling of information is emphasized. Offered Semester One. Three semester hours.

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COMPUTER SCIENCE

CS 201. Hardware Fundamentals – A study in information systems hardware and microprocessors, including hands-on experience with programming and system structure. The objective is to build a basic understanding of hardware configuration and how it interacts with system software. In conjunction with CIS 301, this course is directed toward the A+ certification exam. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

CS 211. Programming Logic – An introduction to all aspects of object-oriented logic and the problem-solving process. Several high level languages are used with emphasis on good programming practices. Laboratory use of a computer is an integral part of the course. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

CS 287. Data Structures – A study of software engineering principles and object-oriented design using pointers, array-based lists, recursion, stacks, queues, search and sort algorithms, and binary trees. Prerequisite: CS 211. Offered fall term odd years. Three semester hours.

CS 297. Object Oriented Programming – A comprehensive course in application programming. Because of variations in course content, this course can be taken multiple times with permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: CS 211. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

CS 301. Operating Systems – A survey of systems software and application software with an emphasis on how hardware and software interact. In conjunction with CS 201, this course is directed toward the A+ certification exam. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

CS 313. Advanced Programming – A second course in object-oriented programming, which goes beyond the procedural concepts of programming. The course uses specific object-oriented techniques such as objects, classes, inheritance, and polymorphism. Prerequisites: CS 211 and CS 297. Because of variations in course content, this course can be taken multiple times with permission of the instructor. Offered spring term even years beginning spring 2016. Three semester hours.

CS 315. Human Computer Interaction – A study of architecture, mathematics, and algorithms that are essential in creating reliable and functional user interfaces. Concepts include current graphical interfaces and interactive systems. Prerequisite: CS 211. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

CS 350. Theory of Computation – A study of theoretical models of computation, including finite state machines, pushdown automata, context-free grammars, Turing machines, decidability, complexity theory, and NP-Completeness. This study covers efficient computation, models of computational processes, and their limits. Prerequisites: CS 211 and CS 287. Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours.

CS 418. Server-side Web Programming – A study of HTML programming to create complex web page layouts containing forms, CSS styles, JavaScript, Objects, Styles, and Events. Prerequisites: CS 211 and CS 297. Offered fall term even years. Three semester hours.

CS 418M. Server-side Web Programming – A study of HTML programming to create complex web page layouts containing forms, CSS styles, JavaScript, Objects, Styles, and Events. Prerequisites: CS 211 and CS 297. Offered fall term even years. Three semester hours.

CS 420. Networking and Communication – An introduction to data transmission concepts and techniques. Topics covered include transmission media, analog and digital signals, data transmissions, multiplexing, network topologies, data security, Ethernet, token rings, and wide area network protocol. Prerequisite: CS 211. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

CS 430. Information Assurance and Security – An in-depth study of current information assurance topic areas. Students will investigate the legal and ethical issues involved with information assurance as well as physical, operating systems, and network security practices. It provides students with the skill or ability to design, execute, and evaluate information system security procedures and practices. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

CS 430M. Information Assurance and Security – An in-depth study of current information assurance topic areas. Students will investigate the legal and ethical issues involved with information assurance as well as physical, operating systems, and network security practices. It provides students with the skill or ability to design, execute, and evaluate information system security procedures and practices. Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours.

CS 440. Distributed Systems and Architecture – A comprehensive study of information system hardware and software in business, emphasizing a managerial and broad systems perspective to information systems architecture. Prerequisites: CS 201 and CS 301. Offered fall term even years. Three semester hours.

CS 491. Internship – A practicum experience in which students work in a professional setting using computer information systems skills from their major courses. Prerequisite: Consent of major professor. Offered every term. One to six semester hours.

CS 495. Seminar – A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from semester to semesters. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor or major professor. Offered das needed. One to three semester hours.

CS 499A. Mentored Research – A faculty-mentored research course in which students craft a research proposal, prepare a literature review, and outline the methods by which they plan to conduct research. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

CS 499B. Mentored Research – A faculty-mentored research course in which students complete their research in a manner consistent with practices in their discipline and submit a written draft of their findings to their mentor. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

CS 499C. Mentored Research – A faculty-mentored research course in which students revise their research and present their findings publicly. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

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COUNSELING

COUN 500. Human Growth and Development - An advanced study of the theories and factors relevant to understanding human development throughout the lifespan. Emphasis on social, cognitive, and affective development, including implications for counseling strategies across the lifespan. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

COUN 520. Theory and Practice of Counseling An introduction of, and initial preparation for, the profession of counseling. Behavioral and professional expectations of counselors are emphasized. The course provides an overview of theories and techniques of counseling and psychotherapy with emphasis on comprehensive analysis of each theory. Skills in intake assessment, treatment planning, brief and long-term models, crisis intervention, and prevention strategies are developed. This course must be taken at Milligan College; no transfer credit will allowed for this course. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

COUN 527. Physiological Psychology and Psychopharmacology An examination of current developments in the fields of physiological psychology and psychopharmacology. The course includes an exploration of the physiological bases of emotion, sleep, sexual behavior, hunger and thirst, learning and memory, psychopathology, and drug use and abuse. Focus is given to basic classifications and indications of commonly prescribed psychopharmacological medications. The appropriate uses of these medications, as well as the identification of their effects and side effects, are emphasized. Offered intermittently. Three semester hours.

COUN 530. Child and Adult Psychopathology An introduction to the evaluation and classification of abnormal human behavior and psychiatric disorders according to current standards of classification. Includes instruction in purpose and use of DSM.. Offered spring term each year. Four semester hours.

COUN 535. Child Sexual Abuse An examination of current research and theory regarding child sexual abuse, including prevalence, causes, dynamics, consequences, and prevention.  Attention is given to treatment approaches and techniques in working with individuals and families involved in sexual abuse situations. Offered intermittently. Three semester hours.

COUN 540. Cultural Diversity in Counseling An emphasis on the development and enhancement of multi-cultural and ethnic awareness and how this impacts counseling. The course is designed to help counselors maximize their effectiveness in working with clients from different cultures and sub-cultures. Includes counseling skills that are effective with clients with various disabilities, races, religions, sexual orientations, and economic backgrounds. Prerequisite: COUN 520. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

COUN 545. Crisis Intervention A survey of specific theoretical models and therapeutic techniques used in crisis intervention and their application to situations encountered in clinical practice including suicide, family and interpersonal violence, survival of disasters and catastrophes, and developmental crises experienced throughout the lifespan. Students gain both knowledge and confidence in their ability to deal with crises. Prerequisite: COUN 500. Offered intermittently. Three semester hours.

COUN 550. Legal and Ethical Issues - An intensive overview of legal, ethical, and professional issues in the provision of counseling services in a variety of settings. Includes review of Tennessee laws, the American Counseling Association code of ethics and related codes as appropriate. Steps in ethical decision-making are discussed and case studies are presented. Students gain an understanding of the need for ethical standards and learn how to follow ethical guidelines. Prerequisite: COUN 520. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

COUN 553. Theories of Personality - An in-depth examination of the major theoretical approaches to the study of personality. Personality development, dynamics and differences are studied with special emphasis on application of each theoretical view to the counseling setting. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

COUN 555. Professional Roles and Practices of School Counselors – An orientation to the school counseling profession and the roles of professional school counselors. This course examines planning, designing, implementing, and evaluating a comprehensive and developmental guidance and counseling program that includes students, teachers, administrators, parents, and community members. The course also examines state and national counseling program models and required competencies. Legal and ethical issues in school counseling also are discussed. Prerequisite: COUN 520. Offered  fall term each year. Three semester hours.

COUN 560. Assessment and Evaluation Techniques - A history and overview of the standardized evaluation methods commonly used in the assessment of individuals and groups. Topics covered are validity, reliability, and statistical concepts for the evaluation and interpretation of test data. Also includes an overview of the various categories of psychological tests and the better-validated tests within each category. Students gain skills in the ethical and professional selection, administration, scoring, and interpretation of commonly used aptitude, achievement, and interest tests. Prerequisite: COUN 520. Prerequisite or corequisite: COUN 530.Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

COUN 580. Substance Abuse Counseling - An introduction to the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of substance abuse and substance dependence. Focuses on the impact substance abuse and substance dependence can have on individual, marital, family, and vocational problems. Prerequisites: COUN 520, COUN 530. Offered intermittently. Three semester hours.

COUN 600. Integration of Faith and Learning Seminar – An ongoing discussion and examination of the theoretical and practical aspects of the integration of faith and learning. Students take this course each fall and spring term they are in the counseling program.  One-half semester hour.

COUN 610. Group Dynamics and Group Counseling - An introduction to group dynamics and group counseling with emphasis on theoretical and practical issues. Reviews historical perspectives, popular treatment techniques, empirical evidence on treatment efficacy, ethical and legal issues, and integration considerations. Prerequisite: COUN 520. Offered summer term each year. Three semester hours.

COUN 620. Career Counseling – An introduction to methods used in counseling clients about career-related decisions. Provides an overview of test instruments used to evaluate skills and aptitudes, methods to give guidance for training and job placement, and job interview strategies. Prerequisite: COUN 520. Offered summer term each year. Three semester hours

COUN 625. Marriage and Family Counseling - An examination of several leading contemporary theories of marriage and family counseling, with emphasis on the techniques used within each of those theories. Prerequisite: COUN 520. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

COUN 630. Treatment Planning A review of current models of treatment planning for the DSM-IV (TR) disorders most commonly encountered by Master’s-level counselors. Prerequisite: COUN 520, COUN 530. Offered intermittently. Three semester hours.

COUN 644. Child and Adolescent Assessment - Advanced training in the use of psychological assessment instruments for the evaluation of children and adolescents experiencing emotional, behavioral, or academic problems.  Preparation of evaluations, recommendations, and report writing for presentation of information to family and professionals is emphasized. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

COUN 645. Child and Adolescent Counseling A survey of psychotherapeutic approaches and techniques for child and adolescent problems. This survey is conducted within a strong developmental framework. Emphasizes empirically supported psychotherapeutic programs for specific disorder presentations and conceptual skills necessary for effectively intervening with children, adolescents, and their parents. Prerequisites: COUN 520, COUN 530. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

COUN 648. Evidence-Based Counseling Techniques A study of counseling techniques that have been supported by systematic empirical research. Emphasis is placed on applying specific empirically-supported interventions to specific problems. Prerequisites: COUN 520, COUN 530. Offered summer term each year. Three semester hours.

COUN 650. End of Life Issues - An examination of the process of dying and grieving in order to learn how the normal grieving process occurs, and how counselors can address with sensitivity the needs of the dying and those who are survivors of loss. Includes a focus on the final months, weeks, and days of life, developmental issues, hospice and other settings for palliative care, issues of unexpected death resulting from acute illness or traumatic injury, as well as insidious illnesses, and support for other caregivers and self. Prerequisites: COUN 520, COUN 530. Offered intermittently. Three semester hours.

COUN 670. Christian Perspectives on Counseling An in-depth consideration of psychological theories and ethics within the context of Christian faith. Focus is given to areas of agreement and disagreement among theories of counseling, theological perspectives, and Christian principles. Ethical and legal issues from both psychology and Christianity are discussed. Prerequisite: COUN 520. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

COUN 680. Research Methods - An examination of the array of research and statistical methods used in the behavioral sciences and helping professions. Emphasis is placed on critically evaluating psychological research and understanding its application to counseling. Prerequisites: MATH 213 or PSYC 259 or equivalent. Offered summer term each year. Three semester hours.

COUN 690. Practicum in Counseling Introductory experience in supervised counseling with clients in selected clinical settings. Students are supervised by the course instructor and a field supervisor and receive feedback from supervisors in order to develop counseling skills. Practicum is arranged with the Clinical Director in the semester prior to beginning the practicum. A minimum of 100 clock hours of supervised experience is required. Liability insurance is required. Prerequisites: COUN 520, 550, at least 20 hours completed in program, permission of instructor. Offered each term. Three semester hours.

COUN 692. Internship I Intermediate experience in supervised counseling with clients in selected clinical settings.  Students are supervised by the course instructor and a field supervisor and receive feedback from supervisors in order to continue to develop their counseling skills. Internship is arranged with the Clinical Director in the semester prior to beginning the internship. A minimum of 300 clock hours of supervised experience is required. Liability insurance is required. Prerequisites: COUN 690, at least 29 hours completed in program, permission of instructor. Offered each term. Three semester hours.

COUN 693. Internship in School Counseling – Supervised internship in both elementary and secondary school settings. The internship will be equivalent to being full-time in the school setting for a semester (600 hours). This will include a variety of activities that a school counselor is expected to perform. At least 240 clock hours are required in direct client contact, individual counseling, group work, developmental classroom guidance, and parent/community conferences. This will be done under the supervision of a licensed school counselor and will also include consultation with an assigned faculty supervisor. The internship will be a cooperative effort planned by Milligan College, a local school system, and the student. Students must apply for internship at least one full semester in advance. Liability insurance is required. Prerequisites: COUN 690, at least 29 hours completed in program, and permission of instructor. Offered each term. Six semester hours.

COUN 694. Internship II Advanced experience in supervised counseling with clients in selected clinical settings. This course is taken during the last semester of the student’s program. The internship may be concurrent with other courses or may occur after coursework is completed. Students are supervised by the course instructor and a field supervisor and receive feedback from supervisors in order to enhance their counseling skills. Internship is arranged with the Clinical Director in the semester prior to beginning the internship. A minimum of 300 clock hours in an approved facility under the supervision of an appropriately trained and licensed mental health professional is required. Liability insurance is required. Prerequisites: COUN 692, at least 38 hours completed in program, permission of instructor. Offered each term. Three semester hours.

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ECONOMICS

ECON 170. Personal Finance - An overview of personal and family financial planning with an emphasis on financial record keeping, planning spending, tax planning, consumer credit, making buying decisions, purchasing insurance, selecting investments, and retirement and estate planning. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

ECON 200B. Principles of Economics - A study of resource allocation that focuses on optimal decision-making by the consumer and the firm. This study is facilitated by analytical tools that include the theories of supply and demand, market structure, and business cycles. The intervention of the government sector into the private sector will also be included. Offered Term Two. Four semester hours.

ECON 201. Macroeconomic Principles - A comprehensive study of demand and supply, private and public economic sectors, national income accounting, theories of employment, business cycles, and economic growth. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

ECON 202. Microeconomic Principles - A comprehensive study of economic decision making at an individual consumer and firm level. Particular attention is paid to the theories of consumer and firm behavior as well as the demand for and efficient utilization of resources. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

ECON 290. Independent Study - Individual study to enable the student either to study material not in the curriculum or to facilitate an individualized approach in a field not now covered in a single course. Not open to freshmen. One to three semester hours.

ECON 301. Corporate Finance - A study of the basic financial structure of the corporate type of business enterprise. Emphasis is given to the various methods of financing and to the role that management plays in determining financial policy. Prerequisite: ECON 202 and ACCT 212. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

ECON 301B. Corporate Finance - A study of the basic financial structure of the corporate type of business enterprise. Emphasis is given to the various methods of financing and to the role that management plays in determining financial policy. Prerequisite: ACCT 320. Offered Term Three. Four semester hours.

ECON 331. Comparative Economic Systems - An introduction to the comparative study of economic systems, their underlying ideological foundations, and institutional arrangements. The historical and political context of various systems is analyzed along with the central organizational features of the major types of economic systems. The major topics covered are: the origins of capitalism; capitalism in theory and as an existing system; market-oriented economies; the Japanese economy; and the changing Chinese economic order. Special emphasis is given to the attempts at transition from centrally planned economies to market-oriented structures in the former USSR and Eastern Europe. Offered summer term each year as part of IBI program. Three semester hours.

ECON 340. Managerial Economics – The application of economic theory and quantitative methods for solving business problems. Emphasis is on the analysis of demand, cost, and profit under conditions of imperfect information and uncertainty. Business pricing strategies receive special attention. Prerequisites: ECON 201 and 202. Offered fall term even years. Three semester hours.

ECON 350. International Trade and Finance - A survey of the analytical and institutional aspects of international trade and finance. The historical and contextual elements are the foundation for the examination of current theoretical and empirical approaches to international economic and business relations. The classroom and the reading coverage are supplemented by resource persons from the fields of economics and management as well as institutions related to this subject area. Offered summer term each year as part of IBI program. Three semester hours.

ECON 401. Advanced Topics in Corporate Finance - A study of topics beyond the scope of Economics 301. Topics covered include capital markets, investment banking, long-term financing through debt, leasing, and stock issuance, dividend policy, convertibles, warrants, derivatives, growth through mergers and acquisitions, and international financial management. The course makes use of in-class problem solving, case assignments, classroom discussion, as well as classroom and on-site visits. Prerequisite: ECON 301. Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours.

ECON 403. Money and Banking - A study of the monetary system and theory along with a survey of the commercial banking system of the United States. Banking principles are analyzed, and banking institutions are studied to observe the application of principles. Prerequisite: ECON 202. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

ECON 460. History of Economic Thought - A study of the development of economics as a social science. Attention is given to the social and political context that has defined rules for economic behavior in the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. Prerequisite: ECON 201 and 202. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

ECON 470. Business Strategy - An integrated study of the functional areas of finance, marketing, and management with emphasis on case analysis, readings, and computer simulations. Prerequisites: BADM 315 and 361 and ECON 301. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

ECON 491. Internship - A practicum experience in which students work in a professional setting using knowledge from economics courses. Prerequisite: consent of major professor. Offered every term. One to six semester hours.

ECON 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from semester to semester. One to three semester hours.

ECON 499A. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students craft a research proposal, prepare a literature review, and outline the methods by which they plan to conduct research. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

ECON 499B. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students complete their research in a manner consistent with practices in their discipline and submit a written draft of their findings to their mentor. Offered every semester as needed.  One semester hour.

ECON 499C. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students revise their research and present their findings publicly. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

ECON 514. Managerial Finance - An exploration of the role of the corporate finance function within an organization. The course begins with fundamental concepts and progresses to more specific decision rules designed to maximize the value of a firm. Topics include: capital markets, free cash flows, capital budgeting, cost flow estimation, risk and return, pricing models, valuation, cost of capital, and capital structure. Three semester hours.

ECON 524. Managerial  Economics – An exploration of the microeconomic issues affecting the firm. The course emphasizes the application of constrained optimization techniques to common problems faced in the management of the typical business enterprise such as price determination, output level, and the use of alternative productive resources. Three semester hours.

ECON 525. Managerial Economics for Operations – An analysis of the effective integration of design, planning, and production processes. Emphasis is placed on practical applications of modeling techniques that include the derivation of demand forecasts, cost parameters, and quality enhancements. Three semester hours.

ECON 526. Total Quality Management –A study of the framework and philosophies of total quality management, process management, and quality control processes in all aspects of an enterprise. The fundamentals of probability and statistics and their application to six sigma, strategic quality management, statistical process control and lean manufacturing are examined. Three semester hours.

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EDUCATION

EDUC 150 and 150B. Introduction to Education - An orientation to the education profession from the perspective of the teacher. The readings and discussions are designed to be an introduction to the current knowledge base related to teaching. Emphasis is given to the characteristics of the caring and reflective teacher. Students will begin a teacher education portfolio in this class. Field experience practicum with related topics included. EDUC 150 offered every term. Two semester hours.

EDUC 152 and 152B. Technology in Education - Applications of technology for use in the PreK-12 classroom and for the teacher’s record keeping and research. EDUC 152 offered every term. One semester hour.

EDUC 231, 231M and 231B. Psychology and Education of Exceptional Students - A study of the education of exceptional students and the psychological aspects of exceptionalities. Includes discussion of assessment, family participation, IFSPs/IEPs, service delivery models, general curriculum, and intervention strategies. Includes observation and participation in classrooms with students with special needs. EDUC 231 offered fall term. Three semester hours.

EDUC 233, 233M and 233B. Child Guidance - A study of skills and techniques for promoting positive behaviors in children birth through elementary age. Students learn how to manage routine situations related to care and education of children in a variety of professional settings from child development centers to elementary schools including the study of different approaches to classroom management. Field experience included. EDUC 233 offered fall term. Two semester hours.

EDUC 234. Classroom Management - A study of skills and techniques for managing middle school and secondary classrooms. Emphasis is on strategies that prevent discipline problems and promote positive student behaviors. Review of different approaches to classroom management and discipline. Emphasizes the positive child guidance theory and constructivist learning. The knowledge base includes Brophy, Deitz, Evertson, Canter, Glasser, Johnson and Johnson, Slaven, Walker. Field experiences included. Offered spring term each year. Two semester hours.

EDUC 280. Media Effects on Children and Adolescents - A seminar course in media literacy with an emphasis on the psychological, social, and educational effects on children and adolescents. The course includes discussion of the evolving nature of media and laws governing them. Such media include television, movies, the Internet, newspapers, magazines, music, and interactive video games. Discussion and assignments focus on the relative impact of these media on things such as body image, drug and alcohol use, sexuality, sociability, morality, and cognitive development. An emphasis is placed on becoming a media literacy advocate within one’s own family, school, and community. Cross-listed as COMM 280 and PSYC 280. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours.

EDUC 290. Independent Study - Individual study to enable the student either to study material not in the curriculum or to facilitate an individualized approach in a field not currently covered in a single course. Not open to freshmen. One to three semester hours.

EDUC 301 and 301B. Introduction to Early Childhood and Elementary Education - An overview of the education of children from birth through 12 years of age. History of the field, professional resources, educational models and theories, importance of working with families and appreciating diversity, and basics of developing curriculum. Field experience included. EDUC 301 offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

EDUC 306. Middle Grades and Secondary Foundations - History, philosophy, and social foundations of middle grades and secondary education. Included are examinations of middle grades and secondary organization and curriculum and an overview of assessment and instructional strategies. Developmental characteristics, learning styles, and typical interests and activities of pre-adolescents and adolescents are also explored. Field experience included. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

EDUC 321. Assessment for Instruction A study of the role of formative and summative assessment and evaluation in student learning. Candidates will learn why assessment is critical for effective teaching, the different types of assessment, and how to develop and use assessment strategies, convert the results of assessment into reports including grades, involve students in self-assessment, and communicate assessment results to students and parents. Offered fall term. Three semester hours.

EDUC 355. Literacy Development - A study of how language with all its components develops and is nurtured to maturity. Emphasis is given to what brain research and learning research explain about learning, the language arts of listening, speaking, writing, spelling, reading, and thinking. Focus is on learning to use current methods and balanced strategies for assessing and teaching language and reading in the primary grades. Extensive field experience included. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

EDUC 355B. Literacy Development - A study of how language with all its components develops and is nurtured to maturity. Emphasis is given to what brain research and learning research explain about learning, the language arts of listening, speaking, writing, spelling, reading, and thinking. Focus is on learning to use current methods and balanced strategies for assessing and teaching language and reading in the primary grades. Extensive field experience included. Four semester hours.

EDUC 356 and 356B. Reading Processes with Assessment and Intervention - A study of the diagnosis of reading skills and the objectives, methods, and materials for the correction of reading difficulties. Direct contact with children in tutorial and small group teaching situations is included. Enrollment limited to students admitted to the professional level of the teacher education program. Field experience included. EDUC 356 offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

EDUC 357. Content Area Reading - A study of approaches and procedures designed to assist students in grades 4 - 12 in becoming adept readers. The primary focus will be on reading and language arts in the curriculum content areas. Building literacy development in students with both typical and atypical language skills is included. Techniques to modify and expand instruction based upon student development will be examined and discussed. Enrollment limited to students admitted to the professional level of the teacher education program. Field experience included. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

EDUC 403, 403M and 403B. Parent Education and Involvement – A study to prepare future educators for their role as partners with parents in the education of their children. In addition to learning how to implement school-based strategies, the students will learn how to conduct parent education and involvement activities in community settings and to offer programs for special groups of parents including new parents, foster parents, adoptive parents, parents experiencing divorce and other forms of family destabilization, and parents serving as teachers in home-based early childhood settings. EDUC 403 and 403B offered once a year. Three semester hours.

EDUC 406. Early Childhood and Elementary Curriculum and Methods - A study of the educational needs of students in the cognitive realms of scientific, social, mathematical, and language learning. The focus is on planning and implementing a learning environment that provides hands-on discovery learning where the student is an active participant and decision-maker. Emphasis is given to the integration of the content areas, especially math, science, social studies, and the language arts. Field experience included. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

EDUC 406B. Early Childhood and Elementary Curriculum and Methods - A study of the educational needs of students in the cognitive realms of scientific, social, mathematical, and language learning. The focus is on planning and implementing a learning environment that provides hands-on discovery learning where the student is an active participant and decision-maker. Emphasis is given to the integration of the content areas, especially math, science, social studies, and the language arts. Field experience included. Four semester hours.

EDUC 408. Middle Grades and Secondary Curriculum and Methods - A course preparing middle school and secondary education students to integrate and organize the knowledge of the disciplines to fit the particular needs of students. Emphasis on assessment, planning, instructional strategies, and evaluation. Includes individualized instruction by a content area specialist on materials and methods specific to licensing areas. Field experience included. Offered spring term each year. Five semester hours.

EDUC 440, 440M, and 440B. Engaging Children through Diversified Strategies - A course preparing students for working with diverse student populations and focusing on the use of strategies which differentiate instruction to accommodate the learning styles, language proficiency, special needs, cultural influences, gender, and brain development of children four to fourteen years of age. The course concentrates on engaging all learners through the arts, through environmental design, and through research based instructional strategies. Field experience included. EDUC 440 offered spring term each year. Two semester hours.

EDUC 442. Early Childhood Special Education – A study of approaches to and strategies for early childhood special education, including a study of the history and current trends in the field. After a review of major service delivery models for young children with disabilities, students gain experience in creating learning environments, instructional opportunities, and intervention strategies for young children with disabilities. The course covers the use of adaptive and assistive technologies appropriate for young children and models for consultation and family involvement for early childhood special education. Field experience in a variety of non-school service delivery environments including homes, clinics, centers, and preschools is included. Prerequisite 231, 231M or 231B. Offered as needed. Three semester hours.

EDUC 443 and 443B. Practicum - A supervised experience lasting for one semester or less in a program for children ages birth through seventeen. For child and youth development majors who are not seeking professional teaching licensure. EDUC 443 offered on demand; EDUC 443B offered as needed. One to six semester hours.

EDUC 443SE. Early Childhood Special Education Practicum - A supervised experience creating learning environments, instructional opportunities, and intervention strategies for young children in non-school settings, including homes, clinics, centers, and preschools. The experience provides opportunities to work collaboratively with families, consultants, and other professionals serving young children with disabilities, preparing young children for entry into the formal school setting. Prerequisite or corequisite: EDUC 442. Offered as needed Three semester hours.

EDUC 451. Student Teaching: Elementary - An experience in lesson planning, instruction, and assessment, Grades K-6. An extensive orientation prepares the student for student teaching experience (fifteen weeks minimum) that includes the refinement of planning, instruction, and assessment skills in the classroom setting. Students follow the schedule of the school system to which they are assigned. Approval to student teach required. Concurrent enrollment in EDUC 460 Capstone Seminar required. Offered every term. Twelve semester hours.

EDUC 452 and 452B. Student Teaching: Early Childhood - An experience in lesson planning, instruction, and assessment, grades PreK-3. An extensive orientation prepares the student for student teaching experience (fifteen weeks minimum) that includes the refinement of planning, instruction, and assessment skills in the classroom setting. Students follow the schedule of the school system to which they are assigned. Approval to student teach required. Concurrent enrollment in EDUC 460/460B Capstone Seminar required. EDUC 452 offered every term; EDUC 452B offered fifth term. Twelve semester hours.

EDUC 453. Student Teaching: Middle Grades - An experience in lesson planning, instruction, and assessment for grades 4-8. An extensive orientation prepares the student for a student teaching experience (typically fifteen weeks minimum) that includes the refinement of planning, instruction, and assessment skills in the classroom setting. Students follow the schedule of the school system to which they are assigned. Approval to student teach required. Concurrent enrollment in EDUC 460 Capstone Seminar required. Offered every term. Twelve semester hours.

EDUC 454. Student Teaching: Secondary - An experience in lesson planning, instruction, and assessment for grades 7-12. An extensive orientation prepares the student for a student teaching experience (typically fifteen weeks minimum) that includes the refinement of planning, instruction, and assessment skills in the classroom setting. Students follow the schedule of the school system to which they are assigned. Approval to student teach required. Concurrent enrollment in EDUC 460 Capstone Seminar required. Offered every term. Twelve semester hours.

EDUC 455. Student Teaching: K-12 - An experience in lesson planning, instruction, and assessment for grades K-12. An extensive orientation prepares the student for a student teaching experience (typically fifteen weeks minimum) in K-12 specialty programs that includes the refinement of planning, instruction, and assessment skills in the classroom setting. Students follow the schedule of the school system to which they are assigned. Approval to student teach required. Concurrent enrollment in EDUC 460 Capstone Seminar required. Offered every term. Twelve semester hours.

EDUC 456. Teaching Practicum - A supervised practicum in lesson planning, instruction, and assessment for grades PreK-12. Designed for post-baccalaureate students seeking an additional endorsement or interim license. Does not substitute for student teaching. Offered on demand. Three, six, twelve semester hours.

EDUC 460 and 460B. Capstone Seminar - A capstone seminar designed to promote reflection, in-depth discussion, and collaborative action research. Designed to integrate all elements of the program, document program outcomes in the candidate portfolio, and verify program completion. Also includes topical presentations by Milligan and partner school faculty. Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the professional level of the teacher education program and approved to student teach. Corequisite with student teaching. EDUC 460 offered every term; EDUC 460B offered fifth term. One semester hour.

EDUC 475, 457M and 475B. Early Childhood Administration - A study of the philosophy, organization, and components of developmentally appropriate early childhood programs. Administration, environmental aspects, staff development, and financial management of programs are examined. Offered as needed. Two semester hours.

EDUC 489. Directed Readings - A supervised program of reading and research that provides for study of material not included in the regular course offerings. Offered as needed. One to three semester hours.

EDUC 490. Directed Studies - A program of readings and conferences that provides for individualized study. Offered as needed. One to three semester hours.

EDUC 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from semester to semester. Offered as needed. One to three semester hours.

EDUC 499A. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students craft a research proposal, prepare a literature review, and outline the methods by which they plan to conduct research. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

EDUC 499B. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students complete their research in a manner consistent with practices in their discipline and submit a written draft of their findings to their mentor. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

EDUC 499C. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students revise their research and present their findings publicly. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

EDUC 511. Research Methods in Education - The role of inquiry in education and an overview of educational research methods and design. Study of problem solving, research methods, research design, and basic data analysis procedures used in experimental, quasi-experimental, descriptive, and qualitative research. Completion of a research prospectus, literature review, research design, and instrumentation for a research project. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

EDUC 511M. Research Methods in Education - The role of inquiry in education and an overview of educational research methods and design. Study of problem solving, research methods, research design, and basic data analysis procedures used in experimental, quasi-experimental, descriptive, and qualitative research. Completion of a research prospectus, literature review, research design, and instrumentation for a research project. Three semester hours.

EDUC 512. Research Seminar - Completion of the research study begun in Education 511. Students discuss types of data, appropriate data analysis procedures, published research, and principles of research interpretation. Prerequisite: EDUC 511, 511M. Offered spring term each year. Two semester hours.

EDUC 512M. Research Seminar - Completion of the research study begun in EDUC 511. Students discuss types of data, appropriate data analysis procedures, published research, and principles of research interpretation. Prerequisite EDUC 511, 511M. Offered spring term each year. Two semester hours.

EDUC 513. Scholarly Writing - Each candidate reports on his or her own research findings, explores subsequent publication, and reflects upon applications of research in the classroom and school. Prerequisite: EDUC 512 or 512M. Offered May and/or summer term each year. One semester hour.

EDUC 513M. Scholarly Writing - Each candidate reports on his or her own research findings, explores subsequent publication, and reflects upon applications of research in the classroom and school. Prerequisite: EDUC 512 or 512M. Offered May term each year. One semester hour.

EDUC 520. Middle Grades and Secondary Curriculum and Methods - Study of strategies for designing and implementing curriculum in the middle grades and secondary school including assessment, unit and lesson planning, and styles of instruction. Material is developed into strategies for classroom practice. Offered spring and summer term each year. Three semester hours.

EDUC 521. Middle Grades and Secondary Curriculum and Methods II (Content Areas) - A study of current curriculum and teaching strategies used in specific teaching disciplines. Continuation of EDUC 520 with assistance from content area specialists. Offered spring and summer term each year. Three semester hours.

EDUC 522. Preschool - Early Primary Curriculum - A study of planning and implementing curricula for children 0 – 8 years of age in private and public school settings. This study includes a review of State of Tennessee early childhood standards and professional standards for developmentally appropriate practice for young children. The course includes the study of different early childhood education curriculum models along with the review and application of current research on pre-literacy and pre-mathematics in designing early childhood curriculum. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours.

EDUC 523. Models of Teaching - A study of a variety of approaches to teaching designed to give teachers a broad repertoire of teaching skills that will enable students to become more effective learners and bring about particular kinds of learning. Also included is an examination of the new technologies available in education to meet the diverse needs of learners. Offered summer term each year. Three semester hours.

EDUC 524. Intermediate Curriculum – An intensive study of the fourth, fifth, and sixth grade curricula based on the State of Tennessee Curriculum Standards and Academic Vocabulary. The focus is on planning and implementing standards-based curricula within a framework of meaningful and active learning. Candidates learn to use assessment to plan and implement instruction and assess learning. The course includes extensive study of research-based effective instructional strategies. Offered as needed. Three semester hours.

EDUC 524M. Intermediate Curriculum – An intensive study of the fourth, fifth, and sixth grade curricula based on the State of Tennessee Curriculum Standards and Academic Vocabulary. The focus is on planning and implementing standards-based curricula within a framework of meaningful and active learning. Candidates learn to use assessment to plan and implement instruction and assess learning. The course includes extensive study of research-based effective instructional strategies. Offered as needed. Three semester hours.

EDUC 525. Structure of the Curriculum - A study of current trends in curriculum development, including curriculum integration. Candidates learn how to define objectives, plan for improvement, and organize instructional materials. An elective in licensed teacher programs. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours.

EDUC 527. Content Area Reading - A study of approaches and procedures designed to assist students in grades 4-12 in becoming adept readers. The primary focus is on reading and language arts in the curriculum content areas. Guiding literacy development in students with both typical and atypical language skills is included. Techniques to modify and expand instruction based on student development are examined and discussed. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

EDUC 529. Teaching Mathematics - A study of the presentation of calculation skills and applied mathematics problem-solving appropriate to the elementary schools. Remediation strategies are included. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours.

EDUC 530. Education of Exceptional Students - A study of the applications of educational theories and research related to the instruction of students with special needs. Topics include student characteristics, motivation, instruction, evaluation, and procedures for special education referrals. Offered spring and summer terms each year. Three semester hours.

EDUC 532. Counseling of Children and Families - A study of counseling principles important to teachers as they interact with children and their families. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours.

EDUC 534. Curriculum and Methods for Elementary Music - A study of the philosophy, curriculum, methods, and materials of teaching music to children including studies of the child’s musical development (grades PreK-6). Cross-listed as MUSC 451. Offered fall term even years. Three semester hours.

EDUC 535. Curriculum and Methods for Secondary Music - A study of the philosophy, curriculum, methods, and materials of teaching vocal and instrumental music and ensembles in grades 7-12. Cross-listed as MUSC 452. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

EDUC 536. Instrumental Methods I - A study of brass and string instruments with emphasis on playing fundamentals, pedagogy, curriculum, and materials. Cross-listed as MUSC 436. Offered fall term odd years. Three semester hours.

EDUC 537. Instrumental Methods II - A study of woodwind and percussion instruments with emphasis on playing fundamentals, pedagogy, curriculum, and materials. Cross-listed as MUSC 437. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

EDUC 538M. Teaching English Language Learners - A study of the characteristics of children who are English Language Learners (ELL), of the assessment of their literacy skills, and of literacy intervention strategies based on a review of the literature pertaining to ELL instruction. Relevant topics include: establishing a classroom environment that is positive and welcoming for the English language learner; establishing routines; communicating with ELL students; using simple sign language; using whole group strategies; guiding written expression; establishing a buddy system and peer tutoring; organizing volunteer programs. The course provides support to a “reflective and caring” teacher of English language learners. Offered as needed. Three semester hours.

EDUC 540. Health and Physical Education Methods - Reading and discussion of fitness and health concerns of children. The course includes instruction and practice related to physical activity and rhythmical activities. Emphasis is on integration of health and physical education topics and activities into the curriculum. Offered spring term each year. Two semester hours.

EDUC 541. Engaging Learners in Content Instruction - An exploration of the broad range of needs exhibited by learners in the typical elementary classroom including learning styles, cultural influences, modalities, and brain development. It focuses on the use of research-based practices for differentiating instruction to support student success in the content areas and for building a culturally responsive classroom community. Field work included. Offered spring term each year. Two semester hours.

EDUC 544. Advanced Children’s Literature - An in-depth study of children’s literature, infancy through adolescence. Emphasis is on criteria for planning, presenting, and evaluating a quality literature program to provide rich literary experiences, grades Pre-Kindergarten - grade 8. Candidates compare and contrast literary contributions from all genres of literature and literature which represents diverse cultures and people. Offered spring or summer term each year. Three semester hours.

EDUC 545. Advanced Early Childhood Special Education - A course designed to prepare candidates to teach young children with disabilities and support families in school and non-school settings. Topics addressed will include historical and philosophical foundations of services for young children with exceptional learning needs, current trends and issues in the field, service delivery models effective with young children with disabilities, application of family systems theory in early childhood special education, teaching and intervention strategies for young children with special needs, use of assistive and adaptive tools and technologies, and use of consultants and other resources. Prerequisite: EDUC 530 or EDUC 579. Offered as needed. Three semester hours.

EDUC 550 Elementary Physical Education Methods - A course designed to prepare students to teach physical education to elementary students. This course includes practical presentation of classroom management, developmentally appropriate skill development, assessment techniques, and lesson preparation and presentation. Field experience with written evaluation is included in this course. Offered as needed. Three semester hours.

EDUC 551. Internship I - A full-day, full-semester, school-based professional growth experience. In addition to a specific teaching assignment, the student may have observations of various school situations, emphasizing diversity, exceptionality, and rural and urban settings. Some experiences to develop psychological readiness for the profession are included. Concurrent enrollment in EDUC 560 Advanced Capstone Seminar required. Offered fall term each year. Five semester hours.

EDUC 552. Internship II - A full-day, full-semester, school-based professional growth experience. A continuation of the internship involving greater responsibility in the teaching assignment. Concurrent enrollment in EDUC 560 Advanced Capstone Seminar required. Offered spring term each year. Six semester hours.

EDUC 553. Teaching Practicum - A supervised practicum in lesson planning, instruction, and assessment for grades PreK-12. Designed for post-baccalaureate students seeking an additional endorsement or transitional license. Offered on demand. Three, six, twelve semester hours.

EDUC 560A/B. Advanced Capstone Seminar - A capstone seminar designed to promote reflection, in-depth discussion, and collaborative action research. Designed to integrate all elements of the program and document program outcomes in the candidate portfolio. Also includes topical presentations by Milligan and partner school faculty. Enrollment limited to students enrolled concurrently in EDUC 551 and 552 Internship. Will be repeated once for credit. Offered fall and spring terms each year. One semester hour.

EDUC 562. Seminar in Middle Grades and Secondary Foundations - A survey of the historical, philosophical, legal, and social foundations of middle and secondary school education in the United States. Offered fall and summer term. Three semester hours.

EDUC 563. Advanced Educational Psychology - A study of the application of psychological theories and research to classroom setting. Topics include student characteristics, mental health, personality, learning theories, group dynamics, motivation, and evaluation with a focus on social constructivist theory. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours.

EDUC 565. Technology in Education - A study of applications of technology to instruction of children in PreK-12 schools and to the maintenance of records and resources. Includes multimedia, computer-based educational games, access to learning resources via the Internet, and web page design. An elective in secondary and licensed teacher programs. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours.

EDUC 570 Secondary Physical Education and Physical Wellness Methods - A course designed to prepare students to teach physical education and wellness in secondary schools. This course will include practical presentation of classroom management, developmentally appropriate skill and lifetime sport development, assessment techniques, and lesson preparation and presentation. Field experience with written evaluation is included in this course. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours.

EDUC 571. Early Childhood and Elementary Foundations - A study of historical, philosophical, and theoretical foundations of early childhood and elementary education with an introduction to curriculum planning and an emphasis on major trends and issues in early childhood and elementary education. Offered fall and summer terms. Three semester hours.

EDUC 572. Advanced Child Guidance - A study of skills and techniques for handling behavioral and disciplinary issues of young children. Candidates create and design creative experiences and activities for children in the setting of their internship. Emphasis is on providing a developmentally appropriate environment that fosters social/emotional development. Offered fall term. Three semester hours.

EDUC 573. Advanced Child Development and Learning - An interdisciplinary study of the physical, cognitive, social, and personality development of the child from birth through adolescence. Major theories of learning including the constructivist model are covered. Implications of child development for classroom teaching are addressed. Three semester hours. Offered summer term each year.

EDUC 575. Advanced Early Childhood Administration - A discussion of the philosophy, organization, and components of developmentally appropriate programs for children and their families. Administration, environmental aspects, parent and community involvement, staff supervision, evaluation, development, and budget of programs are examined. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours.

EDUC 575M. Advanced Early Childhood Administration - A discussion of the philosophy, organization, and components of developmentally appropriate programs for children and their families. Administration, environmental aspects, parent and community involvement, staff supervision, evaluation, development, and budget of programs are examined. Offered as needed. Three semester hours.

EDUC 575M. Advanced Early Childhood Administration - A discussion of the philosophy, organization, and components of developmentally appropriate programs for children and their families. Administration, environmental aspects, parent and community involvement, staff supervision, evaluation, development, and budget of programs are examined. Offered as needed. Three semester hours.

EDUC 576. Early Childhood and Elementary Curriculum and Methods - A study of the educational needs of children. Focus is on planning and implementing learning environments that provide hands-on discovery learning where the student is an active participant, problem-solver, and decision-maker. Candidates learn how to use assessment and implement integrated thematic units and projects related to students’ interests and state standards. Includes guidance and classroom management. Offered summer and fall terms. Three semester hours.

EDUC 577. Language Arts and Reading - A study of the current methods and strategies for teaching language arts and reading, including such topics as language development, phonological awareness, word recognition, whole language, comprehension, vocabulary development, writing, spelling, and assessment. Offered summer and fall terms. Three semester hours.

EDUC 579. Children with Special Needs - A study of early childhood and elementary special education areas: assessment; family participation; IEPs/IFSPs; service delivery models; general curriculum; and intervention strategies. Also includes a study of diversity and its implications for teaching and learning. Offered as needed. Three semester hours.

EDUC 582. Characteristics of Exceptional Children - A study of all aspects of exceptional children including reading, arithmetic, auditory, visual, and perceptual motor problems as well as characteristics of children who are gifted. The student is introduced to assessment using diagnostic tests to determine if special services are needed to assist the children in achieving. Principles and best practices in classroom management are also studied. An experiential approach is used so that critical thinking skills may aid in decision-making. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours.

EDUC 583. Methods of Instruction in Special Education - Educational procedures and materials for teaching exceptional children who are learning disabled, mentally retarded, emotionally disturbed, physically handicapped, gifted, and socially maladjusted with an emphasis on learning. Techniques discussed include behavior modification, perceptual remediation, cognitive and intellectual development, and the use of various apparati helpful to exceptional children. An additional two clock hours per week may be required for observation and experience in the schools. Offered occasionally. Four semester hours.

EDUC 590. Directed Study - Research related to a specific educational problem under the direct supervision of an instructor. Offered as needed. One to six semester hours.

EDUC 592. Grant Writing - An overview of the grant writing process including how to research grant opportunities and how to determine those most appropriate for their own situations. Students write grant proposals and follow-up reports, tailoring proposals to specific organizations. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours.

EDUC 595. Contemporary Issues - A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from semester to semester. An elective in licensed teacher programs. Offered occasionally. One to three semester hours.

EDUC 621. Assessment and Evaluation - A focus on the strategies for the assessment and evaluation of student and teacher performance, including construction of teacher-made tests and alternate approaches. Candidates also learn how to read and interpret standardized test scores for student diagnosis and individualization of instruction. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

EDUC 621M. Assessment and Evaluation - A focus on the strategies for the assessment and evaluation of student and teacher performance, including construction of teacher-made tests and alternate approaches. Candidates also learn how to read and interpret standardized test scores for student diagnosis and individualization of instruction. Offered as needed. Three semester hours.

EDUC 622. Classroom Management - A study of positive child guidance and effective classroom management strategies. Emphasis is on creating safe, caring classrooms through organizing and managing effectively. Topics include psychosocial, physical, instructional, organizational, procedural, and behavior dimensions of classroom management. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours.

EDUC 623M. Research-Based Teaching Strategies - A study of the types of instructional strategies that effectively improve student achievement. Topics may include identifying similarities and differences, summarizing and note taking, reinforcing effort and providing recognition, homework and practice, representing knowledge, learning groups, setting objectives and providing feedback, generating and testing hypotheses, and cues, questions and advance organizers. Classroom implementation of the strategies will be included in the discussion. Offered as needed. Three semester hours.

EDUC 626. Mentorship - A study of the mentoring process. Areas of study include classroom and school environments that effectively nurture mentors and protégées; the recruitment, selection, and training of mentors; matching mentors and protégées; and evaluating the results of mentoring. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours.

EDUC 631. Cultural Diversity and Education – An in-depth study of the ways in which ethnicity and race, age, gender, language, social class, geography, religion and other cultural factors influence teaching and student achievement. Guidelines for culturally responsive curriculum and teaching. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours.

EDUC 641. Advanced Parent Education and Involvement A review of the research on the relationship between family involvement and school achievement; the reasons for developing school, family, and community partnerships; roles and options for parents and families who want to be involved in schools; methods for determining parents’ needs and interests; selecting and implementing different types of parent involvement; and the effectiveness of current national and school-level parent education and involvement programs. Offered once a year. Three semester hours.

EDUC 641M. Advanced Parent Education and Involvement A review of the research on the relationship between family involvement and school achievement; the reasons for developing school, family, and community partnerships; roles and options for parents and families who want to be involved in schools; methods for determining parents’ needs and interests; selecting and implementing different types of parent involvement; and the effectiveness of current national and school-level parent education and involvement programs. Offered once a year. Three semester hours.

EDUC 662. School Organization and Law - A study of the organization and structure of the school including central office activities, special services, supervision, and school level administration. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours.

EDUC 662M. School Organization and Law - A study of the organization and structure of the school including central office activities, special services, supervision, and school level administration. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours.

EDUC 670M. Professional Teacher Standards - A course preparing teachers to meet professional standards established by the National Board of Professional Teaching Standards, paralleling the documentation process required for National Board Certification. This course reviews the five areas required for National Board Certification: 1) Teachers are committed to students and their learning; 2) Teachers know the subjects they teach and how to teach those subjects to students; 3) Teachers are responsible for managing and monitoring student learning; 4) Teachers think systematically about their practice and learn from experience; and 5) Teachers are members of learning communities. Students are coached through an extensive series of performance-based assessments. A portfolio is required for this course. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours.

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ENGLISH

ENGL 164. The Fiction of C. S. Lewis - A close look at Lewis’s fictional works, with some reference to his other writings. Offered fall  term each year. Three semester hours.

ENGL 275. Writing for the Stage and Screen – A studio course in writing for film or for the theatre. Students  learn the basics principles of dramatic writing. Students study examples of dramatic writing, compose a critical paper on the film or stage play of their choice, and create an original short script. This course fulfills the screenwriting credit that is prerequisite for all production courses in the film program, and film students may develop scripts that can be produced in subsequent filmmaking courses. The course is offered as an elective for theatre and creative writing students. Offered fall semester. Three semester hours.

ENGL 290. Independent Study - Individual study to enable the student either to study material not in the curriculum or to facilitate an individualized approach in a field not covered in a single course. Not open to freshmen. One to three semester hours.

ENGL 295. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote discussion, research, and writing in areas not included in the regular course offerings. Topics vary from semester to semester. One to three semester hours.

ENGL 304-305. Survey of American Literature - A study of the literature of the American people with special attention to the writings of the major authors. Collateral reading is assigned in the American novel. ENGL 304 offered fall term two out of three years; ENGL 305 offered spring term alternate years. Three semester hours each semester.

ENGL 311. Advanced Grammar - Advanced study in the principles of English grammar with attention to sentence structure, verb forms, and current usage. Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester hours.

ENGL 312. Introduction to Linguistics - A study of the basic principles of linguistic analysis as specifically applied to the English language. Offered fall term every third year. Three semester hours.

ENGL 324. Advanced Writing - An opportunity for extensive experience in writing, editing, critiquing the works of others, and working toward publication. Prerequisites: COMP 111 and 211 (or equivalent) and approval of the instructor. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

ENGL 335. Editing and Style – A survey of the fundamentals of editing, style, layout, and production in various media formats. Lab work with The Stampede is required. Cross listed as COMM 335. Prerequisite: COMM 205 or consent of instructor. Offered fall term odd years. Three semester hours.

ENGL 354. Children’s Literature - A study of children’s literature designed to acquaint the student with the literary contributions suitable for elementary grades. Not applicable towards an English major. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

ENGL 354B. Children’s Literature - A study of children’s literature designed to acquaint the student with the literary contributions suitable for elementary grades. Not applicable towards an English major. Offered second term. Three semester hours.

ENGL 361. Novel - A study of the history and development of the novel as a literary type with special emphasis on eighteenth and nineteenth-century British and American novels. Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester hours.

ENGL 362. African-American Narrative Literature - A study of autobiographical and fictional narratives by African-American writers with emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and attention to historical context and current critical issues. This course fulfills the ethnic studies course requirement in the general education core. Offered fall term alternate years. Three semester hours.

ENGL 365. Literature by Women - A study of women’s literature as a distinct tradition. The course involves reading of major women writers from different periods and genres, with the major emphasis on the nineteenth century and the twentieth century. Writers studied include Mary Wollstonecraft, the Brontes, Christina Rossetti, Kate Chopin, Virginia Woolf, Susan Glaspell, Doris Lessing, Adrienne Rich, Toni Morrison, and Caryl Churchill. Offered fall term alternate years. Three semester hours.

ENGL 375. Post-Colonial Literature  in English – A study of representative writers from the British Commonwealth who are reshaping and enriching the English tradition. Writers studied include Chinua Achebe, J.M. Coetzee, Buchi Emecheta, Nadine Gordimer, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, V.S. Naipaul, Naguib Mahfouz, Ngugi wa Thiong’o, Salman Rushdie, and Wole Soyinka as well as selected poets from Asia, Africa, and South America. Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester hours.

ENGL 402. Short Story - A chronological study of the genre of the short story  during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries with emphasis on American, British, and post-colonial stories. A unit on writers who examine the role of God and faith in human experience is featured in the last month of the semester. Offered fall term alternate years. Three semester hours.

ENGL 404. Mark Twain: American Idol – A study of Twain’s skills, weaknesses, and development as a writer from the 1860’s to his death in 1910. The course involves close reading of several of Twain’s major works, with reference to his own life experiences and the American culture which he both admired and attacked. Prerequisite: HUMN 201, or ENGL 304, or ENGL 305, or the equivalent of one of these—or approval of the instructor. Offered spring term even-numbered years. Three semester hours.

ENGL 411. Modern and Contemporary Poetry and Drama - A study of  significant works of  poetryand drama in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries., including American, English, and post-colonial writers. . Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

ENGL 414. British Fiction of the Twentieth Century - A study of major British writers in the Twentieth Century, such as A. S. Byatt, Joseph Conrad, E. M. Forster, Graham Greene, James Joyce, D. H. Lawrence, Katherine Mansfield, Iris Murdoch, and Virginia Woolf. Offered fall term alternate  years. Three semester hours.

ENGL 430. Medieval Literature - A study of English literature of the Middle Ages, beginning with Beowulf and concluding with Malory’s Morte Darhtur. Readings will cover major authors with selections from Chaucer, Gower, Langland, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and The Book of Margery Kempe. Additional readings will introduce various genres such as the saint’s life, medieval dramas, ballads, riddles, and romances. Offered fall term alternate years. Three semester hours.

ENGL 431. Narrative Journalism - A practical course in researching and writing in-depth feature articles for newspapers and magazines, including a survey of trends in feature writing. Students will also have the opportunity to produce stories using video and/or audio media. Students submit their work for publication. Cross listed as COMM 431. Prerequisite: COMM 205 or consent of instructor. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

ENGL 432. Age of Satire: Swift, Pope, Johnson, and Their Contemporaries – Engagement with fiction, drama, and poetry from the English Restoration and Eighteenth Century, with special attention to the cutting edge of satire. Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester hours.

ENGL 434. The Age of Wordsworth: Poetry, Prose, Politics - A study of the Romantic era in English literature with special emphasis upon the poet Wordsworth and his contemporaries, both poets and prose writers, along with selected political writings. Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester hours.

ENGL 435. Victorian Debates: Wealth, Women, Evolution, and Empire - A study of the fascinating contradictions of the second half of the nineteenth century as expressed in the major poets, essayists, and novelists of the period. Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester hours.

ENGL 440. Genre Studies – A study of the development of popular genres in literature and film with attention to historical context and current critical issues. Genres examined may include Westerns, mystery, science fiction, and/or fantasy. Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester hours.

ENGL 450. Introduction to Literary Theory and Criticism - A study of the theory and practice of literary criticism, designed to provide knowledge of the underpinnings of the discipline and a primary conversance with the major approaches. This is a seminar course, involving discussions, independent research, and oral presentations. Offered fall term alternate years. Three semester hours.

ENGL 460. Elizabethan Drama - An examination of the earlier Shakespearean plays with collateral reading in the works of his fellow playwrights. Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester hours.

ENGL 461. Jacobean Drama - An examination of the later Shakespearean plays with collateral reading in the works of his fellow playwrights. Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester hours.

ENGL 462. Love and Faith: Spenser, Donne, Milton, and Their Contemporaries - Careful readings of the works of Spenser, Sidney, Shakespeare (nondramatic), Jonson, the Metaphysical poets, and Milton. Offered fall term every three years. Three semester hours.

ENGL 489. Directed Readings - A supervised program of readings which provides for study of material not included in the regular course offerings. One to three semester hours.

ENGL 490. Directed Studies – An individualized program of reading, writing, editing, and conferences in which the student will develop a significant portfolio of writing.Required for the English major with writing emphasis. The student will consult with the Area Chair of Humane learning to arrange for an instructor and develop a tutorial proposal.Three semester hours.

ENGL 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from semester to semester. One to three semester hours.

ENGL 499A. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students craft a research proposal, prepare a literature review, and outline the methods by which they plan to conduct research. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

ENGL 499B. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students complete their research in a manner consistent with practices in their discipline and submit a written draft of their findings to their mentor. Offered every semester as needed.  One semester hour.

ENGL 499C. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students revise their research and present their findings publicly. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

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FRENCH

FREN 111-112. Elementary French - A proficiency-oriented introductory course emphasizing oral communicative skills, including the essentials of grammar, practical vocabulary, and basic reading and writing skills within a cultural context. Three class periods and one laboratory period per week. French 111 and 112 will be offered in the fall term of 2012 for six semester hours.

FREN 211-212. Intermediate French - A proficiency-oriented intermediate course consisting of a review of elementary skills and an integrated development of more complex listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Cultural and literary readings serve as a basis for class discussion and written compositions. Three class periods and one laboratory period per week. Pre-requisite: FREN 112 or equivalent. French 211 and 212 will be offered in the spring of 2013 for sex semester hours.

FREN 301-302. Advanced Conversation and Composition - Intensive practice in the oral and written language with emphasis on vocabulary, syntax, and culture necessary for communication. Classes are conducted in French. Prerequisite: French 211-212 or equivalent. French 301 offered fall term and French 302 offered spring term every three years (based on student demand). Three semester hours each semester.

FREN 311. Survey of French Literature I - A study of the major works of French literature from the Middle Ages through the Eighteenth Century. Selections from a variety of authors and genres are read. Readings and discussions are in French. Prerequisites: French 211 and 212 or equivalent. Offered fall term every three years (based on student demand). Three semester hours.

FREN 312. Survey of French Literature II - A study of the major works in French literature from the Nineteenth and Twentieth centuries. Selections from a variety of authors and genres are read. Readings and discussions are in French. Prerequisites: French 211 and 212 or equivalent. Offered spring term every three years (based on student demand). Three semester hours.

FREN 401. French Civilization and Culture I - An overview of French civilization and culture from prehistoric times to the present. Topics include geography, history, philosophy, art, and music. Readings, class discussion, and reports are in French. Prerequisites: French 211-212 or equivalent. Offered  every three years (based on student demand). Three semester hours.

FREN 402. French Civilization and Culture II - A cultural study of contemporary French society. Topics include family, religion, education, government, economy, and structure of society. Readings, class discussion, and reports are in French. Prerequisites: French 211-212 or equivalent. Offered every three years (based on student demand). Three semester hours.

FREN 489. Directed Readings - A supervised program of readings which provides for study of material not included in the regular course offerings. Available on demand. One to three semester hours.

FREN 490. Directed Studies - A program of readings and conferences which provides for individualized study. Available on demand. One to three semester hours.

FREN 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, writing, and concentration in areas beyond regular course offerings. Topics vary from semester to semester. Available on demand. One to three semester hours per semester.

FREN 499A. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students craft a research proposal, prepare a literature review, and outline the methods by which they plan to conduct research. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

FREN 499B. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students complete their research in a manner consistent with practices in their discipline and submit a written draft of their findings to their mentor. Offered every semester as needed.  One semester hour.

FREN 499C. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students revise their research and present their findings publicly. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

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GENERAL SCIENCE

GNSC 101. Science in Your World - An introductory general science course which focuses upon the practice of science and how consumers can make informed decisions about science as it impacts their world.  Offered every term. Two semester hours. 

GNSC 301. Critical Thinking in the Sciences - An exploration of the application of critical reasoning strategies to standardized test questions as found on professional exams (such as the GRE, MCAT, PCAT, DAT, etc.). After reviewing content in biology, general chemistry, and organic chemistry, students will utilize a critical thinking approach to answer practice questions. Review of the way the practice questions were structured as well as the answer choices will reinforce how the critical thinking process could/should be applied to arrive at the correct answer.  Offered spring semester every year. One semester hour.

GNSC 350. Basic Applications of Scientific Principles - A course focusing upon the understanding of scientific principles and the modeling of scientific principles in a variety of situations. Prerequisites: BIOL 110 and PHYS 104 or the equivalent. Not applicable to a major or minor in either biology or chemistry. Offered spring term each year. Two semester hours.

GNSC 350B. Basic Applications of Scientific Principles - A course focusing upon the understanding of scientific principles and the modeling of scientific principles in a variety of situations. Prerequisites: BIOL 110 and PHYS 104 or the equivalent. Offered fifth term. Two semester hours.

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GEOGRAPHY

GEOG 202. Cultural and Ethnic Geography - An introduction to world/human geography emphasizing human geographic diversity and unity, space economy, functional organization, and human/environmental impacts. The content includes the study of population, language, religion, folk and popular culture, economic activity, and human impact on natural systems. This course fulfills the ethnic studies course requirement in the general education core. Offered every term. Three semester hours.

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GERMAN

GERM 111-112. Elementary German - The pronunciation and writing systems, dialogs and exercises for oral mastery of basic vocabulary and structural patterns, basic conversation, reading and written composition. GERM 111 and 112 offered in fall term 2012. Total of six semester hours.

GERM 211-212. Intermediate German - Continued conversational practice, including discussion of timely topics based on readings from modern German literature and contemporary periodicals; writing practice and some grammar review. GERM 211 and 212 offered in spring term 2013. Total of six semester hours.

GERM 489. Directed Readings - A supervised program of readings, which provides for study of material not included in the regular course offerings. Offered by individual arrangement with the professor. One to three semester hours.

GERM 490. Directed Studies - A program of readings and conferences, which provides for individualized study. Offered by individual arrangement with the instructor. One to three semester hours.

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GREEK

GREE 111-112. Elementary Greek - A study of the elements of Koine Greek including drill on simple phrases and sentences and the acquisition of vocabulary. Selected readings in New Testament literature are included in the second semester. Greek 111 offered fall term each year; Greek 112 offered spring term each year. Three semester hours each semester.

Students must pass GREE 111 before enrolling in GREE 112.

GREE 221-222. Intermediate Greek - The translation and grammatical analysis of New Testament passages representing a cross-section of Greek styles. The course also includes a study of intermediate grammar and some work with textual critical apparatus. Greek 221 offered fall term each year; Greek 222 offered spring term each year. Three semester hours each semester.

Students must pass GREE 112 before enrolling in GREE 221.

Students must pass GREE 221 before enrolling in GREE 222.

GREE 290. Independent Study - Individual study to enable the student either to study material not in the curriculum or to facilitate an individualized approach in a field not now covered in a single course. Not open to freshmen. One to three semester hours.

GREE 331. Advanced Greek Exegesis - The study and practice of exegetical methodologies for interpreting the Greek New Testament, with emphasis on their uses in teaching and preaching. Introduction to textual criticism is included. Offered fall term as needed. Three semester hours.

GREE 332. Advanced Greek Readings - Selected readings in the Septuagint, Philo, Josephus, and the Apostolic Fathers with attention to historical-theological contributions of these writers and works. Offered spring term as needed. Three semester hours.

GREE 499A. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students craft a research proposal, prepare a literature review, and outline the methods by which they plan to conduct research. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

GREE 499B. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students complete their research in a manner consistent with practices in their discipline and submit a written draft of their findings to their mentor. Offered every semester as needed.  One semester hour.

GREE 499C. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students revise their research and present their findings publicly. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

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HEBREW

HEBR 111-112. Elementary Biblical Hebrew - A study of the elements of biblical Hebrew, with an emphasis on vocabulary, verbal morphology, and basic grammar. Selected readings from the Hebrew Bible are included in the second semester. Offered fall and spring terms in periodic years. Three hours each semester.

HEBR 211-212. Intermediate Biblical Hebrew - A study of biblical Hebrew emphasizing grammar and syntax, with emphasis on achieving facility in reading the Hebrew Bible. Some attention is given to the use of textual critical apparatus. Offered fall and spring terms in periodic years. Three hours each semester.

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HISTORY

HIST 206. History of Islam - A study of the political, religious, social, and cultural institutions of the Islamic world from the birth of Muhammad to the modern period. This course fulfills the ethnic studies course requirement in the general education core. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

HIST 208. History of the Jews since A.D. 70 - A social, cultural, theological, and political study of the Jewish people in the last two millennia. The course examines the influence and victimization of the Jews in Diaspora, giving special attention to such issues as the development of sacred texts; the rise of Christian-anti-Semitism; ghettoization and Enlightenment of European Jewry; the development of Hassidic, Reform, Conservative and Reconstruction Judaism; philo-Semitism; political anti-Semitism; Zionism; the Holocaust; the establishment and maintenance of the State of Israel; and dispensationalism. Part of a three-year cycle in European history, this course will be offered in spring term of 2015. The course fulfills the ethnic studies requirement in the general education core. Three semester hours.

HIST 209. United States History Survey I - A study of the history of the United States from the European encounter to the War Between the States. The course examines the growth of political institutions and the social and economic life of the people of the United States. Prerequisite: Humanities 101 and 102, or consent of instructor. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

HIST 210. United States History Survey II - A study of the history of the United States from the War Between the States to the 1970s. The course examines the growth of political institutions and the social and economic life of the people of the United States. Prerequisite:  Humanities 101 and 102 , or consent of instructor.  Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

HIST 250. Christ, Hitler, and Women: The German Church Struggle 1933-1945 - A study of the Nazi persecution of Catholic and Protestant Churches, with special emphasis on the role of women in the Confessing Church. Part of a three-year cycle in European history. Three semester hours.

HIST 271. History of Christian Missions - A survey of the history and progress of missions since the beginning of Christianity. Offered only on demand. Three semester hours. Same as CMIN 271.

HIST 275. Selected Topics in the History of the Reformation of the Nineteenth Century - An examination of the Stone-Campbell heritage including both primary and secondary readings intended to help students understand the church tradition (the “Restoration Movement”) that is linked to the history of Milligan College. Students may not apply this course to a major in Bible or history. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of instructor. Offered periodically. One semester hour.

HIST 290. Independent Study - Individual study to enable the student either to study material not in the curriculum or to facilitate an individualized approach in a field not now covered in a single course. Not open to freshmen. One to three semester hours.

HIST 295. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote lectures, discussion, research, and writing at an introductory level in areas not included in the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from semester to semester. One to three semester hours.

HIST 306. Medieval European Society - A study of the development of Western European civilization from the collapse of the Roman Empire through the fourteenth century. The course encompasses the political, economic, religious, and intellectual dimensions of medieval European culture and society. Prerequisite: HUMN 101-102 and 201-202, or six hours of European history, or consent of instructor. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

HIST 316. The Press in Society - A study of the history and development of news and news media and their role and impact in modern societies. The course will examine cultural, religious, political, technological, and economic interactions between “the press” and the societies in which they operate, paying particular attention to the United States. Cross listed as COMM 316. Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours.

HIST 323. Christian Thought in the Greco-Roman World - A course of readings in various representatives of the Christian tradition from the second through the fifth century, including Origen, Tertullian, Cyprian, Athanasius, Ambrose, and Augustine in their historical contexts. Special attention is given to the contributions of these thinkers to the development of the Christian tradition. This course may satisfy the Church history core elective for the Bible major. Prerequisites: HUMN 101-102 and 201-202, or consent of the instructor. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

HIST 324. Roman History through the Pax Romana - A study of Rome’s progress from its origins through its Republican period and the peak of its Empire in the first two centuries of the Christian era (the Pax Romana). Prerequisite: HUMN 101-102 and 201-202, or six hours of European history, or consent of instructor. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

HIST 326. Late Roman and Byzantine Empires - A study of Roman history from the end of the Pax Romana in the late second century A.D. The course examines the centuries of decline and collapse in the Western Empire as well as the Byzantine Empire to 1453. Prerequisites: HUMN 101-102 and 201-202 and HIST 324, or consent of instructor. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

HIST 331. History of Modern Britain, 1688-Present - A diplomatic and cultural study of the British Isles since the Glorious Revolution of 1688. This course examines the remarkable British record of increasingly democratic constitutional reform that avoided the violence that shook the rest of Europe in the last three centuries. The study focuses special attention on the political, philosophical, and religious movements that have produced modern Britain. Prerequisites: HUMN 101, 102, 201, 202 or consent of the instructor. Part of a three-year cycle in European history.. Three semester hours.

HIST 332. History of Modern France, 1789-Present - A diplomatic and cultural study of France since the Revolution of 1789. This course examines France’s mercurial role as a Western power, and its vacillation between republicanism and autocracy through five republics and two empires. The course focuses special attention on the role of religion in the cultural and political life of the country. Prerequisite: HUMN 101-102 and 201-202 or consent of the instructor. Part of a three-year cycle in European history.. Three semester hours.

HIST 333. History of Modern Germany, 1806-Present - A diplomatic and cultural study of Germany since the Congress of Vienna, this course examines Germany’s rise from fragmentation within the Holy Roman Empire to its present role as an economic and cultural European giant. The study focuses special attention on the philosophical and religious movements that have shaped Germany’s national character. Prerequisites: HUMN 101-102 and 201-202 or consent of the instructor. Part of a three-year cycle in European history. Three semester hours.

HIST 334. Issues in 20th Century Europe - A study of political, social, religious, and philosophical issues in Europe during the twentieth century This course examines the continent’s major political philosophies: Marxism, fascism, and democracy. It investigates the “isms” of the past century, among them nationalism, anti-Semitism, Zionism, and imperialism with their related issues of church/state relations, emigration, xenophobia, union, and an alleged “post-Christian” age. Class discussion ties current events to their historical antecedents. Prerequisites: HUMN 101-102 and 201-202 or instructor’s permission. Part of a three-year cycle in European history. Three semester hours.

HIST 341-342. Church History - A study of the history of the church from its beginning to the present. The course examines the rise of theological patterns, denominational developments, and the church’s response to prevailing culture. Prerequisites: HUMN 101-102 and 201-202 or six hours of history and consent of instructor. HIST 341 offered fall term and HIST 342 offered spring term each year. Three semester hours each semester.

HIST 343. History of Biblical Interpretation - A survey of the history of hermeneutics and exegesis in the Christian tradition from the ancient through the modern periods. The course examines the various principles and methods adopted by theologians in their attempts to explain the meaning of the biblical text. The course emphasizes a program of readings in commentaries and homiletic literature representing different periods in the history of Christianity. This course may satisfy the Church history core elective for the Bible major. Prerequisites: HUMN 101-102 and 201-202 or consent of the instructor. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

HIST 344. The Historical Jesus - A study of how scholars have attempted to develop historical reconstructions of the life of Jesus. This course will survey the progress of scholarly and popular treatment of the topic, the variety and nature of documents upon which historical reconstructions are based, and the major methods used to test historicity and evaluation of these methods. The relationship between historical reconstructions and the Jesus of faith will be considered. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

HIST 352. Reformations of the Sixteenth Century - A study of the religious and theological reform movements in sixteenth-century Europe. The course focuses on the various theologies of the period, exploring the meaning of the term “reformation” as it applies to the various religious movements: Lutheran, Reformed, Radical, and Catholic. This course may satisfy the Church history core elective for the Bible major. Prerequisite: HUMN 101-102 and 201-202, or six hours of European history, or consent of instructor. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

HIST 376. Jefferson to Jackson - A study in the history of the Early National Period of the United States from 1787 to the 1830s with attention given to the ideas and events which resulted in the emergence of the nation and the development of the frontier. Prerequisites: HIST 209 and 210 or consent of instructor. Offered fall term alternate years. Three semester hours.

HIST 377. The Middle Period: 1840-1880 - A survey of the core years of the Nineteenth Century in the United States. At the center of the course of study are the American Civil War, its causes, character, and consequences. Prerequisites: HIST 209 and 210 or consent of instructor. Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester hours.

HIST 379. The Gilded Age: 1877-1920 - An examination of the nation in the midst of its industrial development and rapid population growth with specific reference to the impact of that industrialization on U.S. culture, economy, and politics. Prerequisites: HIST 209 and 210 or consent of instructor. Offered fall term alternate years. Three semester hours.

HIST 380. The United States in the Twentieth Century - An exploration of U. S. culture and society from World War I to the present. Prerequisites: HIST 209 and 210 or consent of instructor. Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester hours.

HIST 401. History and Historians - A study of the discipline of history and the role played by historians in recording, writing, and interpreting history. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing, twelve hours of history, and consent of instructor. Offered fall term each year. One semester hour.

HIST 431-432. Reformation of the Nineteenth Century - A study of the religious movement to restore New Testament Christianity as a basis for Christian union. HIST 432 may satisfy the Church history core elective for the Bible major. Prerequisites: HUMN 101, 102, and 201 or consent of instructor. HIST 431 offered fall term each year; HIST 432 offered spring term each year. Three semester hours each semester.

HIST 450. The Holocaust - A study of the destruction of Europe’s Jews by the Nazis. This study covers the general topic of anti-Semitism, anti-Jewish legislation, the implementation of the Final Solution, and the Jewish response. Offered spring term every three years. Three semester hours.

HIST 480. Seminar on Vietnam - A survey of the Vietnam era in U.S. history. This course examines precursors in the U.S. and Southeast Asia, the Vietnam war era, and the war’s legacies to the nation and its people. The course concentrates heavily upon historical and psychological elements through intensive reading, conversation, and class presentations. This course fulfills the ethnic studies course requirement in the general education core. Offered spring term alternate years. Cross-listed as PSYC 480. Three semester hours.

HIST 489. Directed Readings - A supervised program of readings, which provides for study of material not included in the regular course offerings. One to three semester hours.

HIST 490. Directed Studies - A program of readings and conferences, which provides for individualized study. One to three semester hours.

HIST 494. Senior Thesis Seminar - Required of all history majors in their junior or senior year, the senior thesis seminar provides an opportunity for students to produce a senior thesis reflecting original research. Working in cooperation with fellow history majors and under the joint supervision of the history faculty, students will learn how to choose an appropriate research topic, make use of bibliographic tools, develop an argument, and organize and write a research paper. Students will work on their own projects and serve as peer critics for other projects. Offered spring term each year. One semester hour.

HIST 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from semester to semester. One to three semester hours.

HIST 499A. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students craft a research proposal, prepare a literature review, and outline the methods by which they plan to conduct research. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

HIST 499B. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students complete their research in a manner consistent with practices in their discipline and submit a written draft of their findings to their mentor. Offered every semester as needed.  One semester hour.

HIST 499C. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students revise their research and present their findings publicly. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

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HUMANITIES

HUMN 091. Reading and Study Strategies for College Success - An integrated approach to college-level reading and study strategies, including concentration, comprehension, note-taking, test-taking, and time management, designed to accompany Humanities 101. Not applicable toward the 128 hours required for a degree. Offered fall term each year. Two semester hours.

HUMN 101 Ancient and Medieval Cultures - An interdisciplinary course involving extensive reading in the history, literature, philosophy, and fine arts of cultures from prehistory to the fourteenth century. Offered fall term each year. Four semester hours.

HUMN 101M. Ancient and Medieval Cultures - An interdisciplinary course involving extensive reading in the history, literature, philosophy, and fine arts of cultures from prehistory to the fourteenth century. Offered online spring term as needed. Four semester hours.

HUMN 102. Renaissance and Early Modern Cultures – An interdisciplinary course involving extensive reading in the history, literature, philosophy, and fine arts of cultures from the fourteenth to the eighteenth centuries. Offered spring term each year. Four semester hours.

HUMN 102M. Renaissance and Early Modern Cultures – An interdisciplinary course involving extensive reading in the history, literature, philosophy, and fine arts of cultures from the fourteenth to the eighteenth centuries. Offered online summer term as needed. Four semester hours.

HUMN 200P. European Study Tour Preparation - Students going on the tour are required to register for one hour of HUMN 200P in the spring semester prior to the tour. HUMN 200P includes attending specified sessions (lectures and discussions) focused on twentieth-century Europe and meetings dealing with tour preparation issues. HUMN 200P and HUMN 200T may be taken in lieu of HUMN 202 (4 hours).  Prerequisites: HUMN 101 and HUMN 102. Offered every spring term. One semester hour.

HUMN 200T. European Study Tour – A study tour of several European countries. Visits are made to sites of both historical and cultural significance. In addition to travel, students complete writing assignments and fulfill all the academic obligations outlined by the tour professor. HUMN 200T and HUMN 200P may be taken in lieu of HUMN 202 (4 hours). Prerequisites: HUMN 101, HUMN 102, and HUMN 200P. Offered every summer. Three semester hours.

HUMN 201. Eighteenth and Nineteenth-Century Cultures – An interdisciplinary course involving extensive reading in the history, literature, philosophy, and fine arts of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.  Offered fall term each year. Four semester hours.

HUMN 202. Cultures of the Twentieth and Early Twenty-first Centuries – An interdisciplinary course involving extensive reading in the history, literature, philosophy, and fine arts of the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. Offered spring term each year. Four semester hours.

Note: HUMN 101 is a recommended course of study fall semester for all freshmen working toward a B.A., B.S., or B.S.N. degree. Except for those experiencing serious academic difficulties, students should continue in HUMN 102, 201, and 202 in subsequent semesters. Once a student enrolls in the daytime program at Milligan College, still needing humanities courses as part of the core, those courses must be taken at Milligan College.

HUMN 211. Introduction to Women’s Studies – An interdisciplinary course designed to introduce the field of women’s studies including a review of significant historical movements and documents as well as discussion of contemporary literature and theory. Offered spring semester even years. Three semester hours.

HUMN 285. Japanese Literature (in translation) - A study of twentieth-century Japanese fiction that illuminates the character and culture of the Japanese people. (Readings are by Japanese authors in English translation.) This course fulfills the ethnic studies course requirement in the general education core. Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester hours.

HUMN 290. Independent Study - Individual study to enable the student either to study material not in the curriculum or to facilitate an individualized approach in a field not now covered in a single course. Not open to freshmen. One to three semester hours.

HUMN 380. Jesus in the Arts - An exploration of the creative images of Jesus throughout the centuries, drawing examples from the literary, dramatic, visual, musical, kinetic, and cinematic arts, seeking a deeper appreciation for the arts in the life of the church and for the impact of the image of Jesus in people’s lives. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

HUMN 385. What Happens After We Die – A seminar that approaches the question of postmortem existence through the chronological study of texts and artworks belonging to diverse religious and philosophical traditions. Offered in spring 2014, 2016, and 2019. Three semester hours.

HUMN 490. Reading and Research in Humane Learning - An individualized course of study to be determined by the student and an advisory committee. At least three hours of Humanities 490 are required for every humanities major. Three to six semester hours per semester.

HUMN 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from semester to semester. One to three semester hours.

HUMN 499A. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students craft a research proposal, prepare a literature review, and outline the methods by which they plan to conduct research. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

HUMN 499B. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students complete their research in a manner consistent with practices in their discipline and submit a written draft of their findings to their mentor. Offered every semester as needed.  One semester hour.

HUMN 499C. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students revise their research and present their findings publicly. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

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HUMAN PERFORMANCE AND EXERCISE SCIENCE

Only courses numbered 104 – 162 fulfill the activity requirement.

HPXS 101. Fitness for Life - A study of the fundamentals, principles, and techniques for development of a lifestyle of wellness and fitness, following a holistic approach. The development and implementation of a personalized fitness program are included. Offered every term. One semester hour.

HPXS 104. Swimming - A course designed for students with differing levels of swimming skills. American Red Cross certification is available through Level VII. A student majoring in human performance and exercise science may take a proficiency exam to receive credit for this course. Offered fall term each year. One semester hour.

HPXS 105. Lifeguarding - A course designed for students who are strong swimmers and proficient in basic swimming strokes. American Red Cross certification is available. Special fee. Offered even fall semesters and even spring semesters each year. One semester hour.

HPXS 108. Folk Dance and Rhythmical Activities - A study of rhythmical exercises, elementary steps, and folk dances of various countries. Clogging, contras, square, and round dances are included. Offered every term. One semester hour.

HPXS 110. Hiking – An activity course designed to introduce students to the nature and benefits of hiking in the southern Appalachian Mountains. In addition to hiking itself, attention is given to safety and equipment. Offered occasionally. One semester hour.

HPXS 112. Resistance Training – An introductory course involving participation in various resistance training exercise techniques. Free weights, variable resistance machines, calisthenics, plyometrics, and other techniques and equipment may be included. Offered occasionally. One semester hour.

HPXS 114. Water Exercise An introductory course involving participation in various water-based exercise. Muscular endurance, cardiovascular endurance, and flexibility will be addressed. Both shallow and deep water exercise may be included. Offered occasionally. One semester hour.

HPXS 116. Flexibility and Strength – An introductory course involving participation in stretching and strengthening exercises based on the physical aspects of the discipline of yoga. Students will learn the connection between exercise and controlling stress, body awareness, immune function, posture, and slowing the effects of aging. Offered occasionally . One semester hour.

HPXS 118. Walking/Running An introductory course designed to develop knowledge, safety measures, and skills in walking, jogging, and running for the purpose of improving or maintaining cardiovascular fitness. Offered occasionally. One semester hour.

HPXS 153. Golf and Pickleball - An introduction to basic strokes and skills necessary for active participation in golf and pickle ball, including game competition and the application of official rules. Offered occasionally. One semester hour.

HPXS 155. Beginning Badminton and Tennis - An introduction to basic strokes, skills, and game competition for beginning students in each of these lifetime sports. Offered fall term each year. One semester hour.

HPXS 156. Intermediate Badminton and Tennis - A course focusing on the skills and techniques of play for those beyond the level of beginners. Offered spring term each year. One semester hour.

HPXS 158 (A, B, and C). Snow Skiing - Instruction at a nearby ski resort. The class and instruction is divided according to level of skill--beginner, intermediate, or advanced. The course may be repeated up to two times as the student and instructions become more advanced. Special fee. Transportation not provided. Offered spring term each year. One semester hour.

HPXS 159 (A, B, and C). Horseback Riding - Instruction at a nearby stables on gaited horses and English tack for beginner, intermediate, or advanced riders. The course may be repeated up to two times as the student and instructions become more advanced. Special fee. Transportation not provided. Offered every term. One semester hour.

HPXS 162. Aerobic Fitness - Active participation involving but not limited to work with stability ball training, water and land aerobics, kettle ball workouts, spinning, power stick activities, and workout bands. Offered every term. One semester hour.

HPXS 170. The Alexander Technique – An introduction to The Alexander Technique, a method of educating the body toward efficient use of the whole self through verbal, visual, and hands-on skills. May be repeated. Offered every term. One semester hour.

HPXS 181. CPR for the Professional Rescuer - A study of infant, child, and two-person adult CPR. This course does not fulfill the Human Performance and Exercise Science activity general education requirement. Special fee. Offered fall term even years and spring term even years. One semester hour.

HPXS 201. Foundations and Legal Issues in Physical Education An introduction to the field of physical education, including history, current trends, and legal considerations involving the practice of physical education.  Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

HPXS 207. Principles of Strength Training - A study of strength training principles focusing on practical application. Students will learn to design individual programs in the context of athletics, general fitness, and recreation. Training adaptations and other physiological concepts will be discussed. This course does not fulfill the Human Performance and Exercise Science activity general education requirement. Offered spring term every year. Two semester hours.

HPXS 270. The Science of Athletic Performance - A course designed for non-HPXS majors who are considering coaching, providing an overview of nutritional, physiological, and biomechanical considerations. Topics are presented in the context of their impact on training, conditioning, and athletic performance. Offered spring term even years. Two semester hours.

HPXS 271. Foundations of Wellness - A study of mental, physical, and spiritual dimensions of wellness with an emphasis on exercise and nutrition. Includes nutritional analysis and exercise prescription. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours

HPXS 302a. Coaching and Officiating Track and Field - A study of coaching techniques, conditioning, skills, and strategies to prepare the student for coaching and officiating track and field. Knowledge of the rules and regulations is included. Offered occasionally. Two semester hours.

HPXS 302b. Coaching and Officiating Basketball - A study of coaching techniques, conditioning, skills, and strategies to prepare the student for coaching and officiating basketball. Knowledge of the rules and regulations is included. Offered occasionally. Two semester hours.

HPXS 302c. Coaching and Officiating Swimming - A study of coaching techniques, conditioning, skills, and strategies to prepare the student for coaching and officiating swimming. Knowledge of the rules and regulations is included. Offered occasionally. Two semester hours.

HPXS 302d. Coaching and Officiating Softball and Baseball - A study of coaching techniques, conditioning, skills, and strategies to prepare the student for coaching and officiating softball and baseball. Knowledge of the rules and regulations is included. Offered occasionally. Two semester hours.

HPXS 302e. Coaching and Officiating Volleyball - A study of coaching techniques, conditioning, skills, and strategies to prepare the student for coaching and officiating volleyball. Knowledge of the rules and regulations is included. Offered occasionally. Two semester hours.

HPXS 302f. Coaching and Officiating Soccer - A study of coaching techniques, conditioning, skills, and strategies to prepare the student for coaching and officiating soccer. Knowledge of the rules and regulations is included. Offered occasionally. Two semester hours.

HPXS 302g. Coaching and Officiating Golf - A study of coaching techniques, conditioning, skills, and strategies to prepare the student for coaching and officiating golf. Knowledge of the rules and regulations is included. Offered occasionally. Two semester hours.

HPXS 302h. Coaching and Officiating Tennis - A study of coaching techniques, conditioning, skills, and strategies to prepare the student for coaching and officiating tennis. Knowledge of the rules and regulations is included. Offered occasionally. Two semester hours.

HPXS 307. Recreational Leadership and Outdoor Education - A study of the administration and leadership of recreational activities and outdoor educational pursuits. The course includes experience in such activities as camping, hiking, mountain climbing, and orienteering with limited practical application. Special fee. Offered fall term each year. Two semester hours.

HPXS 308. Measurement and Evaluation - A focus on the development of the knowledge, skills, and procedures necessary for testing and evaluating different populations in school, laboratory, or field settings. It is recommended that a student complete Mathematics 213 prior to enrollment in this course. Offered every term. Three semester hours.

HPXS 309. Sports Injuries - A course designed to familiarize the student with recognition and management of injuries related to sports participation. Also covered are aspects of sports medicine, conditioning, strength training, nutrition, and protective equipment. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

HPXS 322. Coaching for Character An investigation of the various dimensions of character development in athletics. Students explore philosophical foundations of character-driven coaching as well as observe, experience, and lead athletic activities designed with a character-development component. Offered occasionally. Two semester hours.

HPXS 333. Human Nutrition - A more advanced study of basic nutrition concepts, building on content covered in HPXS 101 Fitness for Life and HPXS 271 Foundations of Wellness. Nutrients and their requirements, sources, digestions, and roles in body function are covered with emphasis on their relation to exercise and athletics. Offered spring term  each year. Three semester hours.

HPXS 341. Exercise Physiology - A study of the physiological and biochemical responses of the human body to exercise. The basic concepts of physiology are applied to sports performance, personal wellness, and aging. Offered fall term each year. Four semester hours.

HPXS 350. Elementary Physical Education Methods - A practical study of methods, materials, techniques, and skills in teaching physical education to elementary students (grades K-6). Age-appropriate motor development; motor learning, assessment; teaching of movement concepts and basic motor skills, sport and team activities, classroom management, group activities, wellness; and lesson plan preparation and presentation are several components of this course. Field experience and portfolio preparation included. Enrollment limited to students admitted to the professional level of the teacher education program or permission of the instructor. Offered fall term odd years. Four semester hours.

HPXS 352. Kinesiology and Biomechanics - An introduction to the study of the internal and external forces which act on the human body and the effects these forces produce, with special emphasis on the musculo-skeletal system, its development, and its involvement during movement. This course fulfills one four-hour laboratory science requirement in the GER. Offered spring term each year. Four semester hours.

HPXS 370. Secondary Physical Education and Wellness Methods - A practical study of methods, materials, techniques, and skills in teaching physical education and wellness to secondary students (grades 7-12). Age appropriate development; assessment; teaching of lifetime fitness/wellness and lifetime leisure sports and activities; classroom management; and lesson and unit plan preparation and presentation are several components of this course. Field experience and portfolio preparation are included. Enrollment limited to students admitted to the professional level of the teacher education program or permission of the instructor. Offered fall term even years. Four semester hours.

HPXS 382. Sports Marketing - A course designed to provide students with an in-depth knowledge of the strategies and techniques used when promoting and marketing sports. Students will develop promotional strategies associated with real life sport organizations in an effort to understand the unique marketing needs of the sports product. Prerequisite BADM 210. Cross-listed as BADM 382. Offered spring term each year. Two semester hours.

HPXS 383 Sports Finance – A course designed to provide the student with an understanding of various aspects of sports finance including financial budget, analysis, management, and planning. Internal development through fund raising in both the sports and recreation industries will also be covered. Application of course material will be emphasized through project based assignments. Prerequisite BADM 210. Cross-listed as BADM 383. Offered fall term each year. Two semester hours.

HPXS 384. Development and Utilization of Athletic Facilities - A course designed to provide the student with an understanding of the various techniques/theories of athletic facility management and facility design. This course will include traditional classroom presentations, various assigned readings, and facility tours. Prerequisite BADM 210. Offered spring term. Two semester hours.

HPXS 386. Sports Law and Ethics - An overview of legal and ethical issues encountered in both amateur and professional sports in the areas of contracts, torts, antitrust, labor, and agency law. Students explore both the legal and ethical dimensions of contemporary issues in sports while considering relevant case law, statutory law, and scripture. Cross listed as BADM 386. Offered fall term odd years. Two semester hours.

HPXS 401. Research Methods - An investigation of research techniques and methods used in various types of research and an introduction to science-based databases, culminating in the presentation of a research proposal. Prerequisite: HPXS 308 or permission of instructor. Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours.

HPXS 404. Organization and Management of Physical Education and Sports - A study of school problems, including curriculum development; program organization and supervision; and school, amateur, and professional sports. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

HPXS 405. Motor Behavior A study of motor control, motor growth and development, and motor learning. Classical and current theories and laws will be presented. Practical application of these principles will be included especially as related to movement and skill development. Offered fall term each year. Two semester hours.

HPXS 406. Adapted Physical Education - A study of normal and abnormal growth and development of persons with disabilities. Teaching techniques, programs, and services for each disability are presented. Practical experience is expected as part of the course. Offered fall term each year. Two semester hours.

HPXS 436. Exercise in Health and Disease - A study of the relationship of exercise to the components of wellness and healthy lifestyles, including an in-depth look at the interrelationship of exercise with coronary heart disease, obesity, and nutrition. Exercise prescription for the healthy and diseased is explored. Prerequisite: HPXS 341. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

HPXS 440. Health and Physical Education Methods - Reading, discussion, and application of fitness and health concerns of children, Kindergarten through Grade Eight. The course includes instruction and practice related to physical activity and rhythmical activities. Emphasis is on integration of health and physical education topics and activities into the school curriculum, grades K-8. Enrollment is limited to students admitted to the professional level of the teacher education program. Not for Human Performance and Exercise Science majors. Offered spring term each year. Two semester hours.

HPXS 440B. Health and Physical Education Methods - Reading, discussion, and application of fitness and health concerns of children. Kindergarten through Grade Eight. The course includes instruction and practice related to physical activity and rhythmical activities. Emphasis is on integration of health and physical education topics and activities into the school curriculum, grades K-8. Not for Human Performance and Exercise Science majors. Offered fourth term. Two semester hours.

HPXS 489. Directed Readings - A supervised program of readings which provides for study of material not included in the regular course offerings. Faculty tutorial required. One to three semester hours.

HPXS 490. Directed Studies - A program of readings and conferences which provides for individualized study. Faculty tutorial required. One to three semester hours.

HPXS 491. Field Work - A practicum experience that involves the student in a position of supervising/teaching/leading individuals in a school, community, wellness center, or hospital setting. Offered every term. One to six semester hours.

HPXS 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in the regular course offerings. Not offered every year. One to three semester hours.

HPXS 499A. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students craft a research proposal, prepare a literature review, and outline the methods by which they plan to conduct research. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

HPXS 499B. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students complete their research in a manner consistent with practices in their discipline and submit a written draft of their findings to their mentor. Offered every semester as needed.  One semester hour.

HPXS 499C. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students revise their research and present their findings publicly. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

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LEGAL STUDIES

LS 304. Law and Globalization - An examination of the function of law in the globalization era both domestically and internationally. Emphasis will be given to understanding the importance and influence of governmental institutions and specific laws upon individual societies, in particular, developing countries. This course fulfills the ethnic studies course requirement in the general education core. Offered spring term odd years. Cross-listed as POLS 304.  Three semester hours.

LS 310. Philosophy of Law - A detailed study of judicial decision-making and its relationship to the handling of disputes at different levels of the legal structure and various stages of the legal process. Using case-law materials, the techniques of legal reasoning and styles of legal thinking, along with the ways in which judicial decisions are able to respond to the demands of social change, are investigated. Consideration is given to techniques of reading legal texts, strategies of interpretation, legal reasoning, decision-making, and persuasion. Offered fall term even years. Cross-listed as POLS 310.  Three semester hours.

LS 310. Philosophy of Law - A detailed study of judicial decision-making and its relationship to the handling of disputes at different levels of the legal structure and various stages of the legal process. Using case-law materials, the techniques of legal reasoning and styles of legal thinking, along with the ways in which judicial decisions are able to respond to the demands of social change, are investigated. Consideration is given to techniques of reading legal texts, strategies of interpretation, legal reasoning, decision-making, and persuasion. Offered fall term even years. Three semester hours.

LS 320. Constitutional Law - A survey of the historical development of the American Constitution with emphasis on the role of the judicial branch of the government as arbiter in determining the respective limits on national and state power, in protecting the individual against that national and state activity which offends the Bill of Rights and other constitutional guarantees of liberty and property, and in securing civil rights. Selected Supreme Court cases will be studied. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

LS 330. Family Law - An examination of the relationship between the American family, the law, and the church. Topics include the legal definitions of marriage and family; the rights and obligations within the family; the role of church and government in marriage and family life; the dissolution of marriage and related issues such as the distribution of marital assets, alimony, child custody, visitation, and support; the issues of paternity, adoption and surrogacy will also be explored. Offered spring term even years.

LS 340. Juvenile Justice - An exploration of all phases of the contemporary juvenile justice system and an examination of the nature of delinquency, classifications of juvenile offenders, alternative explanations for juvenile misconduct, juvenile courts and juvenile rights, treatment, and corrections. Major court rulings that have shaped contemporary juvenile justice are presented as well. Students also have the opportunity to observe parts of the juvenile justice system first-hand by attending a juvenile court session and visiting a correctional facility for adjudicated delinquents. Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours.

LS 355. Criminal Law and Procedure - A broad introduction to the American criminal justice system. Topics include how crimes are legally defined, legal defenses, and Constitutional limitations. The three major components of the criminal justice system are examined: law enforcement, the judicial system, and corrections. In particular, the focus is on each component’s relationship to substantive and procedural law. Offered fall term odd years. Three semester hours.

LS 420. Law and Christianity - A study of the relationship that exists between Christianity and the law. Students examine the issues of how human laws relate to God’s laws, the foundational principles of a biblical jurisprudence, the nature of responsibility and punishment, mercy and judgment. Attention is paid to whether law can truly be considered a calling and the unique responsibility Christian legal professionals have in society. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

LS 491. Internship - A supervised field work in various law offices and legal agencies, designed to give the student broad exposure and initial practical competencies. Three to six semester hours.

LS 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research and writing in areas not included in the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from semester to semester. One to three semester hours.

LS 499A. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students craft a research proposal, prepare a literature review, and outline the methods by which they plan to conduct research. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

LS 499B. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students complete their research in a manner consistent with practices in their discipline and submit a written draft of their findings to their mentor. Offered every semester as needed.  One semester hour.

LS 499C. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students revise their research and present their findings publicly. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

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MATHEMATICS

MATH 090. Math Strategies for College Success - A review of basic arithmetic and an introduction to beginning topics in algebra. This course attempts to build connections between arithmetic and algebra and to ease the transition to a class in College Algebra or other college level work. It also includes topics in beginning statistics and geometry. It is not applicable toward the 128 hours required for a degree. Students are not allowed to withdraw from MATH 090. Offered spring term each year. Two semester hours.

MATH 107. Principles of Mathematics - An introduction to a variety of mathematical fields including analysis, algebra, probability and statistics, logic, number theory, and topology, together with an analysis of some of the major contributions mathematics has made to civilization. Offered every term. Three semester hours.

MATH 111. College Algebra I - A study of algebraic methods; the natural numbers, the integers, the rationals, and the real numbers; algebraic expressions including polynomials, rational expressions, exponents and radicals, equations and inequalities; and function theory including domain, range, composition, inverses, and graphing techniques. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

MATH 153. Fundamental Concepts I - A study of the real number system and its field properties. As tools for the development of these topics, a study is made of set theory and various numeration systems. Attention is given to problem solving; sets, whole numbers, and numeration; whole number operations and properties; whole number computation; number theory; fractions and decimals; ratio, proportion, and percent. Strategies for explaining these topics will be introduced. Prerequisite: 2 years of high school algebra or MATH 090. Not applicable to a math major or minor. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

MATH 201. Advanced Algebra and Trigonometry – An in-depth study of functions of one variable; in particular polynomials, exponential, logarithmic, trigonometric, and inverse trigonometric functions. Application of these types of functions will be emphasized. Also included is an in-depth presentation of trigonometry; in particular the unit circle, graphs, identities, solving equations, solving triangles, and polar coordinates. Prerequisite: High school Algebra. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

MATH 211. Calculus I – An in-depth study on limits, derivatives, and integrals including their definition, calculation, and application. Prerequisite: MATH 201 or satisfactory performance on Pre-calculus competency exam. Offered fall term each year. Four semester hours.

MATH 212. Calculus II - A study of transcendental functions, their differentiation and integration, formal integration, the conics, Taylor’s formula, and infinite series. Prerequisite: MATH 211. Offered spring term each year. Four semester hours.

MATH 213. Statistics - A study of data analysis and statistical inference. Topics include descriptive statistics, an introduction to probability, continuous and discrete random variables, probability distributions, basic sampling techniques, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing with small and large samples, linear regression and correlation, and an introduction to the analysis of variance. Prerequisite: High school algebra or equivalent. Offered every term. Three semester hours.

MATH 213B. Business Statistics - A study of data analysis and statistical inference as well as various statistical methods applied to topics in business administration. Emphasis is placed upon the use of statistical inference to reduce the impact of limited information from which business people must draw conclusions and make decisions. Topics include descriptive statistical measures, probability, random samples, skewness, random variables, analysis of variance, correlation, and regression. Twelve certifications in statistical exercises and a group project assist students in achieving course objectives. Offered Term Two. Four semester hours.

MATH 213M. Statistics - A study of data analysis and statistical inference. Topics include descriptive statistics, an introduction to probability, continuous and discrete random variables, probability distributions, basic sampling techniques, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing with small and large samples, linear regression and correlation, and an introduction to the analysis of variance. Prerequisite: High school algebra or equivalent. Three semester hours.

MATH 214. Discrete Mathematics - A study of discrete mathematical structures such as sets, permutations, relations, graphs, and finite state machines as well as a variety of mathematics used to study these structures including recursion, induction, counting, algorithms, and finite calculus (difference equations). This course is especially recommended for those whose major or minor is either computer information systems or computer science. Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours.

MATH 253 and 253B.  Fundamental Concepts II - A continuation of the study of the real number system. Topics include rational and real numbers; statistics; probability; measurement; geometry; and algebra. Strategies for explaining the topics and a variety of presentation methods will be explored. Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in MATH 153. Not applicable to a math major or minor. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

MATH 290. Independent Study - Individual study to enable the student either to study material not in the curriculum or to facilitate an individualized approach in a field not now covered in a single course. Not open to freshmen. One to three semester hours.

MATH 301. An Introduction to Mathematical Logic - A study of propositional logic in abstract mathematics and an introduction to the basic structures of modern mathematics including set theory, cardinality, induction, relations, and functions, with particular emphasis on the reading and writing of proofs. Prerequisite: MATH 212 or consent of instructor. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

MATH 303. Multivariable Calculus - A study of three dimensional analytic geometry, curves, calculus of functions of several variables, line integrals, and differential equations. Prerequisite: MATH 212. Offered fall term each year. Four semester hours.

MATH 304. Modern Geometry - A study of axiomatic systems, logic, and Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries from an historical viewpoint. Euclidean incidence, betweenness, congruence, and separation are studied along with models for non-Euclidean geometries and their impact on mathematical thought. Recommended for prospective teachers of mathematics. Offered fall term odd years. Three semester hours.

MATH 307. Linear Algebra - A study of vector spaces, matrices and linear systems, determinants, inner products, and linear transformations. Prerequisite: MATH 212. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

MATH 308. Modern Algebra - A study of algebraic structures such as rings, fields, groups, and integral domains. Recommended for math majors. Prerequisite: MATH 301. Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours.

MATH 309. Differential Equations - A study of the differential equations, their meaning, types of solutions, and uses. Recommended for math majors and minors interested in chemistry and applied math. Prerequisite: MATH 303 and 307. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

MATH 310. Topology - A study of open sets, closed sets, functions, continuity, compactness, connectedness, product spaces, and homeomorphism. Prerequisite: MATH 301. Offered as needed. Three semester hours.

MATH 314. Probability and Statistics I - A study of probability distributions, and inferential as well as descriptive statistics. Topics such as frequency tables, measures of central tendency and dispersion, confidence intervals, and tests of hypothesis are included. Prerequisite: MATH 303. Offered fall term as needed. Three semester hours.

MATH 315. Probability and Statistics II - A continuation of Mathematics 314 which includes an introduction to decision theory, estimation, and hypothesis testing, as well as a discussion of ANOV, non-parametric methods, and other tests. In addition, the course includes an introduction to computer based statistical packages. Prerequisite: MATH 314. Offered spring term as needed. Three semester hours.

MATH 351. Mathematical Modeling - A survey of the construction and development of mathematical models used in science and industry. The mathematics developed contributes to an understanding of the model as well as the associated scientific problem that is approximate. Prerequisites: MATH 307 and 309. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

MATH 408. Numerical Analysis - A study which enables one to write mathematical processes such as integration, differentiation, matrix inversion, and estimation of roots, with arithmetic operations. Study includes orientation toward machine computation. Prerequisites: MATH 307 and 309 and a computer language. Offered fall term odd years. Three semester hours.

MATH 411. Introduction to Real Analysis - A study of the algebraic and topological properties of the real numbers, functions of a real variable, continuity, differentiation, convergency of sequences of functions, Lebesque measure and integration, Riemann-Stieltjes integration, and general measures. Prerequisites: MATH 301 and 303. Offered fall term as needed. Three semester hours.

MATH 412. Introduction to Complex Analysis - An expansion of calculus into the complex numbers.  An introduction into complex integration, path integrals, the Cauchy Integral formula, Morera’s theorem, Liouville’s theorem, calculus of residues, conformal mapping, Taylor and Laurent Series expansions, applications.  Prerequisite: MATH 303.  Offered spring term as needed.  Three semester hours.

MATH 490. Independent Study - Individual work in mathematics under the direct supervision of an instructor. Prerequisite: twenty-four hours of mathematics and consent of the instructor. Offered as needed. One to three semester hours.

MATH 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from semester to semester. Offered fall term even years. One to three semester hours.

MATH 499A. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students craft a research proposal, prepare a literature review, and outline the methods by which they plan to conduct research. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

MATH 499B. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students complete their research in a manner consistent with practices in their discipline and submit a written draft of their findings to their mentor. Offered every semester as needed.  One semester hour.

MATH 499C. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students revise their research and present their findings publicly. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

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MILLIGAN FOUNDATIONS

MLGN 100. Introduction to College and Service – An introduction to the  skills/attitudes needed to succeed in college. These include an appreciation of oneself, one’s skills and talents, others and their skills and talents, management of resources such as talents, time and money, an awareness of the history and culture of Milligan. Required of all freshmen during the first semester of attendance. Offered eight weeks fall semester. One-half semester hour.

MLGN 200. Introduction to Calling and Career - A focus on building behaviors and skills necessary to discern, identify, explore and prepare for a career related to a student’s calling and choice of academic major. The course includes an introduction to basic career practices such as networking, resume preparation, etiquette training, and job search practices. Attention is given to vocational discernment by means of a focused weekend seminar in order to complement and strengthen the focus on vocation throughout the course. MLGN 200 meets for eight sessions with a required etiquette dinner held outside the scheduled class meeting time. The class is required of all students during their sophomore year. Transfer students below the junior level (58 hours) are not exempt unless they transfer in with a comparable credit. The course is offered on a pass/fail basis. One-half semester hour. Offered fall and spring semesters.

MLGN 320. Strategies for Graduate School Acceptance – A Milligan Foundations course designed to assist students in the graduate school application process including graduate school admission’s test preparation, advice on completing the application, identifying and obtaining recommendations, and mock interviews. Prerequisite: MLGN 200. Offered every term. One-half semester hour.

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MUSIC

MUSC 100. Applied Study-Voice - Individual instruction in singing. Open to all students. Offered every term. One semester hour (one hour lesson per week) for music majors whose principal area of concentration is voice. One-half semester hour (one-half hour lesson per week) for all other students.

MUSC 101, 102. Piano as a Secondary Concentration - Applied study for non-piano music majors and minors. Preparation toward attainment of proficiency for music majors. Two class meetings and one lab per week. Music 101 offered fall term each year; Music 102 offered spring term each year. Two semester hours.

MUSC 104. Applied Study-Piano - Individual instruction in piano. Open to all students. Offered every term. One semester hour (one hour lesson per week) for music majors whose principal area of concentration is piano. One-half semester hour (one-half hour lesson per week) for all other students.

MUSC 105. Applied Study-Organ - Individual instruction in organ. Open to all students. Offered every term. One semester hour (one hour lesson per week) for music majors whose principal area of concentration is organ. One-half semester hour (one-half hour lesson per week) for all other students.

MUSC 106. Applied Study-Guitar - Individual instruction in guitar. Open to all students. Offered every term. One semester hour (one hour lesson per week) for music majors whose principal area of concentration is guitar. One-half semester hour (one-half hour lesson per week) for all other students.

MUSC 107. Applied Study-Flute - Individual instruction in flute. Open to all students. Offered every term. One semester hour (one hour lesson per week) for music majors whose principal area of concentration is flute. One-half semester hour (one-half hour lesson per week) for all other students.

MUSC 109. Applied Study-Clarinet - Individual instruction in clarinet. Open to all students. Offered every term. One semester hour (one hour lesson per week) for music majors whose principal area of concentration is clarinet. One-half semester hour (one-half hour lesson per week) for all other students.

MUSC 110. Applied Study-Saxophone - Individual instruction in saxophone. Open to all students. Offered every term. One semester hour (one hour lesson per week) for music majors whose principal area of concentration is saxophone. One-half semester hour (one-half hour lesson per week) for all other students.

MUSC 111. Applied Study-Violin - Individual instruction in violin. Open to all students. Offered every term. One semester hour (one hour lesson per week) for music majors whose principal area of concentration is violin. One-half semester hour (one-half hour lesson per week) for all other students.

MUSC 112. Applied Study-Viola - Individual instruction in viola. Open to all students. Offered every term. One semester hour (one hour lesson per week) for music majors whose principal area of concentration is viola. One-half semester hour (one-half hour lesson per week) for all other students.

MUSC 113. Applied Study-Cello - Individual instruction in cello. Open to all students. Offered every term. One semester hour (one hour lesson per week) for music majors whose principal area of concentration is cello. One-half semester hour (one-half hour lesson per week) for all other students.

MUSC 114. Applied Study-Percussion - Individual instruction in percussion. Open to all students. Offered every term. One semester hour (one hour lesson per week) for music majors whose principal area of concentration is percussion. One-half semester hour (one-half hour lesson per week) for all other students.

MUSC 115. Applied Study-Trumpet - Individual instruction in trumpet. Open to all students. Offered every term. One semester hour (one hour lesson per week) for music majors whose principal area of concentration is trumpet. One-half semester hour (one-half hour lesson per week) for all other students.

MUSC 116. Applied Study-Horn - Individual instruction in French horn. Open to all students. Offered every term. One semester hour (one hour lesson per week) for music majors whose principal area of concentration is French horn. One-half semester hour (one-half hour lesson per week) for all other students.

MUSC 117. Applied Study-Trombone - Individual instruction in trombone. Open to all students. Offered every term. One semester hour (one hour lesson per week) for music majors whose principal area of concentration is trombone. One-half semester hour (one-half hour lesson per week) for all other students.

MUSC 118. Applied Study-Bass - Individual instruction in bass. Open to all students. Offered every term. One semester hour (one hour lesson per week) for music majors whose principal area of concentration is bass. One-half semester hour (one-half hour lesson per week) for all other students.

MUSC 119. Applied Study-Tuba - Individual instruction in tuba. Open to all students. Offered every term. One semester hour (one hour lesson per week) for music majors whose principal area of concentration is tuba. One-half semester hour (one-half hour lesson per week) for all other students.

MUSC 120. Voice Class – A study of vocal technique and its application in a small group setting (5-12 students). Open to all students. Offered every term. One semester hour.

MUSC 124. Piano Class for Beginners - Group instruction for non-music majors and minors with no previous piano experience. The course teaches basic skills in piano playing, music reading, and theory. Students will learn to play various styles of piano music. Offered every term. Two semester hours.

MUSC 130. Applied Accompanying - Individual instruction in the art and practice of accompanying for piano students. One semester hour (one hour lesson per week) for music majors whose principal area of instruction is piano. One-half semester hour (one-half hour lesson per week) for all other students.

MUSC 141. Basic Music Reading Skills - A study of the fundamentals of music including note reading, rhythmic notation, and basic chords. Open to all students. Offered fall term each year. Two semester hours.

MUSC 143-144. Basic Music Theory/Ear Training - A course in beginning written theory, including a laboratory session for developing aural skills. MUSC 143 offered spring term each year; MUSC 144 offered fall term each year. Three semester hours each semester.

MUSC 163. Survey of Pop Music - The study and appreciation of American Popular music from 1900 to the present. Offered fall term every year. Three semester hours.

MUSC 165. Survey of Classical and Film Music – The study and appreciation of the great music and composers of classical music and film scores. Not open to music majors. Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours.

MUSC 166 Survey of Jazz - A study of the origins, development, styles composers and major performers of jazz from its beginnings to present day.  Emphasis is on the African American contribution and how jazz is an ethnic expression of African American culture. Fulfills ethnic studies requirement. Offered spring semester odd years. Three semester hours.

MUSC 170. The Alexander Technique – Introduction to The Alexander Technique, a method of educating the body toward efficient use of the whole self through verbal, visual, and hands-on skills. Offered every term. One semester hour.

MUSC 180. Heard Mentality – Men’s a cappella ensemble performing a variety of literature from pop to jazz to sacred for on and off campus events. By audition. This ensemble does not satisfy the ensemble requirement for music majors and minors. Offered every term. One-half semester hour.

MUSC 181. Heritage - An auditioned a cappella ensemble of four to six singers-men and women-which represents the college in churches, at area civic organizations, and at college functions. This ensemble does not satisfy the ensemble requirement for music majors and minors. Offered every term. One-half semester hour.

MUSC 182. Civic Band - Performance with the Johnson City Community Concert Band. One rehearsal per week. Offered every term. One semester hour.

MUSC 183. Women’s Chorale – A choir of all female voices, performs extensively on campus, the local area, as well as out of state. The group also performs at churches for worship. Their repertoire is varied and includes art songs, spirituals, sacred, contemporary Christian, jazz, multi-cultural, and Broadway. Offered every term. One semester hour.

MUSC 184. Concert Choir – A choir of both men and women, performs extensively on campus and throughout the United States, appearing at churches, high schools, and conventions and appearing with professional orchestras throughout the region. Their repertoire is varied and includes classics, spirituals, hymn arrangements, and musical theater. Offered every term. One semester hour.

MUSC 188. Instrumental Ensemble - A small ensemble for use in specialized performances (ex. musicals, other theatre productions, etc.) or other areas of student and faculty expertise and interest. This ensemble does not satisfy the ensemble requirement for music majors and minors. Offered as needed. One-half to one semester hour.

MUSC 189. Johnson City Symphony Orchestra - Performance with the Johnson City Symphony Orchestra. Audition required. String players must register concurrently with MUSC 192 Orchestra. This ensemble does not satisfy the ensemble requirement for music majors and minors. Offered every term. One-half semester hour.

MUSC 190. Jazz Combo - Ensemble devoted to performance of jazz and pop styles within a small group setting. Emphasis is on small group ensemble playing and individual improvisation. This ensemble does not satisfy the ensemble requirement for music majors and minors. Offered every term. One-half semester hour.

MUSC 191. Jazz Ensemble - Organization is devoted to performance of jazz and pop styles, with emphasis on ensemble playing, solo playing, and improvisation. Open to all students by audition. Offered every term. One semester hour.

MUSC 192. Orchestra – String orchestra that performs a variety of music from classical masterworks to worship music for on and off campus performances. Open to all students by audition. Offered every term. One semester hour.

MUSC 194. Brass Ensemble - An instrumental ensemble composed of brass instruments devoted to the study and performance of literature written specifically for brass. This ensemble does not satisfy the ensemble requirement for music majors and minors. Offered fall term every year. One-half semester hour.

MUSC 196. String Quartet – Chamber ensemble made up of string players from the Milligan College Orchestra that performs a variety of music for on and off campus events. This ensemble does not satisfy the ensemble requirement for music majors and minors. Open only to students registered for MUSC 192 Orchestra and by audition. Offered every term. One-half semester hour.

MUSC 199. Intro to Music Performance – An introduction to solo and ensemble performance techniques, practices, and repertoire for Summer Fine Arts Academy participants only. Offered summer term every year. One semester hour.

MUSC 201. Piano as a Secondary Concentration - Applied study for non-piano music majors and minors. Preparation toward attainment of proficiency for music majors. Two class meetings and one lab per week. Offered fall term each year. Two semester hours.

MUSC 207. Piano Proficiency - A test of general accomplishment in the music major’s secondary applied concentration. Achievement must be completed to fulfill secondary requirements. Offered every term. No credit.

MUSC 211. Introduction to Music Technology - An introductory survey of software related to music notation, recording, mixing, and other educational applications. Offered fall term odd years. Two semester hours.

MUSC 243-244. Advanced Music Theory/Ear Training - A course in advanced written theory, including standard musical forms and contemporary music. A concurrent laboratory session develops and maintains aural skills. Prerequisite: MUSC 144 or permission of the instructor. MUSC 243 offered spring term each year; MUSC 244 offered fall term each year. Three semester hours each semester.

MUSC 250. World Music - An introduction to music styles of the world. Readings, discussion, listening to recorded examples, and exposure to performers and instruments of world cultures. Musical skill not required. This course fulfills the ethnic studies course requirement in the general education core and can be counted toward a major in Humanities. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

MUSC 256. Opera Workshop – An opportunity for students to hone their skills in singing and acting through offering fully staged scenes from the opera repertoire. By audition. Offered as needed. One to two semester hours.

MUSC 311. Women in Music - A study of influential women composers and musicians from the Middle Ages to the present and from a variety of musical genres. Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours.

MUSC 321. Jazz Improvisation - Theory and techniques of jazz improvisation with an emphasis on functional harmony, melodic form, special scales, tune studies, ear training, and development of style. Offered spring term every year. Three semester hours.

MUSC 345. Composition - Techniques of musical composition in standard song forms, as well as instrumental solo and ensemble forms. Prerequisite: MUSC 144. Offered fall term odd years. Two semester hours.

MUSC 347. Form and Analysis - A study of major forms of music from the Baroque period through the Twentieth Century. Prerequisite: MUSC 243 or permission of the instructor. Offered spring term even years. Two semester hours.

MUSC 348. Orchestration and Arranging - A course covering basic characteristics, arranging, and compositional techniques for orchestral instruments. Prerequisite: MUSC 244 or permission of the instructor. Offered spring term odd years. Two semester hours. 

MUSC 363. Basic Conducting - A study of conducting techniques, score reading, stylistic characteristics, and elements of interpretation. Offered fall term even years. Three semester hours.

MUSC 364. Advanced Conducting – A study of advanced conducting techniques for band, choir, and orchestra with emphasis on error detection, rehearsal techniques, and score analysis. Prerequisite: MUSC 363. Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours.

MUSC 367. Music History and Literature I - A survey of the development of Western music through Baroque, citing major composers and forms of each style period. Offered fall term odd years. Three semester hours.

MUSC 368. Music History and Literature II - A survey of the development of Western Music from Classical to the present, citing major composers and forms of each style period. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

MUSC 390. Independent Study - An individualized course which enables the student to study material either not covered in the curriculum or not covered in a single course. The instructor determines the course of study. Offered as needed. One to three hours credit.

MUSC 408. Senior Recital - One-hour performance. May be substituted with the Senior Project for the music-performance and music education major. Instructor permission required. Prerequisite is the successful completion of a junior recital. Offered every term. One semester hour.

MUSC 421. Advanced Jazz Methods - A study of advanced theory and techniques of jazz improvisation with additional emphasis on jazz styles and analysis, time studies, chord progressions, ear training, and jazz concepts. Enrollment must be approved by the instructor. Offered fall term odd years. Three semester hours.

MUSC 436/EDUC 536. Instrumental Methods I - A study of brass and string instruments with emphasis on playing fundamentals, pedagogy, curriculum, and materials. Offered fall term odd years. Three semester hours.

MUSC 437/EDUC 537. Instrumental Methods II - A study of woodwind and percussion instruments with emphasis on playing fundamentals, pedagogy, curriculum, and materials. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

MUSC 451/EDUC 534. Curriculum and Methods for Elementary Music - A study of the philosophy, curriculum, methods, and materials of teaching music to children including studies of the child’s musical development (grades PreK-6). This course also requires field experience during the first two weeks of a secondary school’s fall semester in order to satisfy Tennessee licensure requirements. Offered fall term even years. Three semester hours.

MUSC 452/EDUC 535. Curriculum and Methods for Secondary Music - A study of the philosophy, curriculum, methods, and materials of teaching vocal and instrumental music and ensembles in grades 7-12. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

MUSC 454. Music and Worship Methods - A study of the materials and methods of music and worship ministry in the local church. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

MUSC 456. Applied Instrumental Pedagogy -A study of the philosophy, curriculum, methods, and materials of teaching applied instruments. Offered spring term odd years. Two semester hours.

MUSC 457. Applied Conducting –An intensive individual study in conducting techniques, theories, and practices for band, orchestra, and/or choir. The course also includes comprehensive analysis of musical scores. Instructor permission required. Offered every term. One-half semester hour (half-hour lesson per week) or one semester hour (one-hour lesson per week).

MUSC 490. Senior Project - An individualized course of study (thesis, lecture/demonstration, or other project) to be determined by the student and a faculty committee. Often interdisciplinary in nature, the project relates to the student’s career interests. This course serves as the culminating project for the music-jazz studies major. This course may serve as the culminating project for the music-performance and music education major. Instructor permission required. Offered every term. One to two semester hours.

MUSC 491. Practicum in Music Ministry - Supervised work in an approved church music program. Required of all music ministry minors. Offered as needed. One semester hour.

MUSC 495. Seminar - Seminars in specific areas of music for advanced students. Designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, writing, and performance in areas not included in the regular course offerings. Offered as needed. One to three semester hours.

MUSC 499A. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students craft a research proposal, prepare a literature review, and outline the methods by which they plan to conduct research. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

MUSC 499B. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students complete their research in a manner consistent with practices in their discipline and submit a written draft of their findings to their mentor. Offered every semester as needed.  One semester hour.

MUSC 499C. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students revise their research and present their findings publicly. This course may serve as the culminating project for the music-performance and music education major. Instructor permission required. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

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NURSING

NURS 110M. Global Health Issues - An overview of the current health issues confronting the world population in an on-line format. This course is open to all students and fulfills the ethnic studies course requirement in the general education core. Offered every term. Three semester hours.

NURS 191. Exploration of Professional Nursing - A course open to all students considering entry into the nursing profession. Supervised preceptorship in clinical agencies allows the student to understand better the various roles of the professional registered nurse. Offered fall term each year. One to four semester hours.

NURS 198. Medical Terminology - A course open to all students considering entry into health care related professions. This course is a self- paced course designed to assist students to identify and define the root words, suffixes, prefixes, and combining forms commonly found in medical terminology. Student learning activities and exercises are utilized to assist students to remember significant concepts and to understand the meaning of new words by defining the elements contained within them. Offered every term. One semester hour; one clock hour.

NURS 198OT. Medical Terminology - A course open to M.S.O.T. students only. This course is a self-paced course designed to assist students to identify and define the root words, suffixes, prefixes, and combining forms commonly found in medical terminology. Student learning activities and exercises are utilized to assist students to remember significant concepts and to understand the meaning of new words by defining the elements contained within them. Cross listed as NURS 198. Offered fall term each year. One semester hour.

NURS 201. LPN Transition Course - An overview of the concepts of holistic professional nursing and the nursing process. This process is presented as a critical thinking and problem-solving tool for identifying client problems and for initiating independent and collaborative nursing interventions. Prerequisites: Current LPN/LVN licensure with current practice. Pre/co-requisites: BIOL 250, 251, and 380 or equivalents; NURS 240. Co-requisites: 201C and 202/202L. Offered spring term each year (dependent on student need). Three semester hours; three clock hours.

NURS 201C. LPN Transition Course: Clinical - Opportunities to use the nursing process as a critical thinking and problem-solving tool for identifying and initiating independent and collaborative nursing interventions within this clinical component. Previously learned technical nursing arts and skills are validated. Co-requisite: NURS 201. Offered spring term each year (dependent on student need). One semester hour; three clock hours.

NURS 202. Health Assessment - An exploration of the knowledge, observational, interactional, and psychomotor skills required for assessing the health status and needs of adult clients. Pre/co-requisites: BIOL 250, 251; NURS 210/ 210C or equivalents. Co-requisite: NURS 202L. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours; three clock hours.

NURS 202L. Health Assessment Lab - Opportunities to practice the assessment modalities of inspection, palpation, percussion, and auscultation are provided. Students are expected to conduct and document regional and comprehensive physical examinations within the campus lab setting. Co-requisite: NURS 202. Offered spring term each year. One semester hour; two clock hours.

NURS 210. Fundamentals of Nursing - An introduction to the fundamental concepts of holistic nursing and the nursing process. This process is presented as a critical thinking and problem-solving tool for identifying client problems and for initiating independent and collaborative nursing interventions. Pre/co-requisite: BIOL 250. Co-requisite: NURS 210C. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours; three clock hours.

NURS 210C. Fundamentals of Nursing Clinical - A focus on the development of fundamental competencies required for instituting independent and collaborative nursing interventions. Opportunities to test and use the nursing process as a critical thinking and problem-solving tool are provided. Co-requisite: NURS 210. Offered fall term each year. One semester hour; three clock hours.

NURS 220. Fundamentals of Nursing II - A continuation of NURS 210, the study of the fundamental concepts of holistic nursing and the nursing process. Prerequisites: BIOL 250 or equivalent, NURS 210/210C. Pre/co-requisite: BIOL 251 or equivalent, NURS 220C, and 202/202L. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours; three clock hours.

NURS 220C. Fundamentals of Nursing II Clinical - A continuation of NURS 210C with the focus on giving students opportunities to test and use the nursing process as a critical thinking and problem-solving tool to provide holistic nursing care. Opportunities to develop additional competencies in selected beginning nursing interventions are also provided within the clinical practice setting. Co-requisite: NURS 220. Offered spring term each year. One semester hour; three clock hours.

NURS 240: Dosage Calculations for Nursing Practice - An introduction to the principles of dosage calculations for nursing practice. Emphasis is on the utilization of dimensional analysis for all types of dosage calculation problems and extensive practice in computing dosage calculations. Pre/Co-requisite: NURS 210/210C. Offered every term. One semester hour.

NURS 291M. Clinical Exploration in Nursing - A supervised preceptorship in various agencies allowing the student additional clinical practice with a patient population of interest. Pre/co-requisites: NURS 210/210C. Offered every term, including summer terms. One to four semester hours.

Non-licensed and LPN to RN students may only enroll in NURS 300 level courses upon acceptance into the nursing major through the progression application process.

NURS 301. RN Transition Course - An overview of the theories and concepts of holistic, professional nursing. The nursing process is discussed as a critical thinking and problem-solving tool for identifying client problems and for initiating independent and collaborative nursing interventions. Prerequisites: Current RN licensure. Co-requisite: NURS 301C. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours; three clock hours.

NURS 301C. RN Transition Course: Clinical - Opportunities to utilize and test the nursing process in identifying and initiating independent and collaborative nursing interventions within simulated and clinical practice setting. Previously learned technical nursing arts and skills are validated. Co-requisite: NURS 301. Offered spring term each year. Two semester hours; six clock hours.

NURS 302. RN to BSN Health Assessment -An expansion and refinement of existing knowledge, observational, interactional, and psychomotor skills required for assessing the health status and needs of adult clients. Pre-requisites: Current RN licensure; Biology 250, 251 or equivalents; NURS 301, 301C. Co-requisite: NURS 302C. Offered summer term each year. Three semester hours; three clock hours.

NURS 302L. RN to BSN Health Assessment Lab - Opportunities to expand and refine assessment modalities of inspection, palpation, percussion, and auscultation are provided. Students are expected to conduct and document regional and comprehensive physical examinations within the campus laboratory setting. Offered summer term each year. One semester hour; two clock hours.

NURS 305. Nursing Pharmacology I – The first of two sequential courses covering the pharmacology, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic processes relevant to clinical nursing practice. Emphasis is placed on the study of prototypical drugs, their classification, their effect on human beings, and the implications for nursing practice. Pre/co-requisites: NURS 310/310C. Offered fall term each year. Two semester hours; two clock hours.

NURS 306. Nursing Pharmacology II - A continuation of Pharmacology I and the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamic processes relevant to cljnical nursing practice. Emphasis is placed on the study of prototypical drugs, their classification, their effects on human beings, and the implications for nursing practice. Pre-requisite: NURS 305. Two semester hours; two clock hours.

NURS 310. Adult Medical/Surgical Nursing I - A presentation of adult medical/surgical problems that interfere with client health status. Through the use of the nursing process, complex intervention modalities are discussed. Pre/co-requisites: NURS 305 and 310C. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours; three clock hours.

NURS 310C. Adult Medical/Surgical Nursing I Clinical - A practicum experience providing opportunities within a variety of clinical settings to utilize the nursing process to implement complex intervention modalities with clients experiencing actual or potential medical/surgical health problems. Co-requisite: NURS 310. Offered fall term each year. Two semester hours; six clock hours.

NURS 313. Maternal/Child Nursing - A focus on the pregnant woman, neonate, and family. Course content addresses commonly experienced problems of this population during the childbearing process. Nursing interventions specific to these problems are presented. Pre/co-requisites: NURS 305 or 306. Co-requisite: NURS 313C. Offered every term. Three semester hours; three clock hours.

NURS 313C. Maternal/Child Nursing Clinical - A practicum experience providing opportunities within a variety of healthcare and community settings to utilize the nursing process to implement complex intervention modalities with clients experiencing actual or potential health problems associated with the childbearing process. Co-requisite: NURS 313. Offered fall term each year. Two semester hours; six clock hours.

NURS 320. Adult Medical/Surgical Nursing II - A continuing presentation of NURS 310 and medical/surgical problems that interfere with client health status. Through the use of the nursing process, complex intervention modalities are discussed. Prerequisites: NURS 305, 310/310C. Co-requisite: NURS 306 and 320C. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours; three clock hours.

NURS 320C. Adult Medical/Surgical Nursing II Clinical - A practicum experience providing continuing opportunities within a variety of clinical settings to utilize the nursing process to implement complex intervention modalities with clients experiencing actual or potential medical/surgical health problems. Co-requisite: NURS 320. Offered spring term each year. Two semester hours; six clock hours.

NURS 323. Pediatric Nursing - A focus on the developmental level and commonly experienced physiological and psychosocial problems of infants, children, adolescents, and their families. Complex intervention modalities specific to the pediatric client population are presented through the use of the nursing process. Pre/co-requisite: NURS 305 or 306; co-requisite: 323C. Offered every term. Three semester hours; three clock hours.

NURS 323C. Pediatric Nursing Clinical - A practicum experience providing opportunities within a variety of healthcare and community settings to utilize the nursing process to implement complex intervention modalities with pediatric clients experiencing actual or potential health problems. Co-requisite: NURS 323. Offered every term. Two semester hours; six clock hours.

NURS 350L. Introduction to Nursing Research Lecture - A focus on developing an understanding and use of nursing research as a basis for professional nursing practice. Students are introduced to the steps of the nursing research process and evaluation and critique of nursing literature. Pre/co-requisites: MATH 213 or equivalent; progression into the nursing major or admissions to ADCP RN to BSN. Offered spring term each year. Two semester hours: two clock hours

NURS 350S. Introduction to Nursing Research Discussion Section - A focus on developing an understanding and use of nursing research as a basis for professional nursing practice. Students apply the foundations of qualitative and quantitative research to critically analyze and critique nursing research, formulate a research question and research proposal. Pre/co-requisites: MATH 213 or equivalent, NURS 350L; and progression into the nursing major. Offered spring term each year. One semester hour; one clock hour.

NURS 390. Independent Study - Special topics and/or experiences not addressed within the curriculum and non-substitutable for required courses in the major but of special interest to the student. Course work is accomplished independently under a pre-approved contract with a designated faculty member. Prerequisite: departmental approval for the proposal. To be arranged. One to three semester hours; one to three clock hours.

NURS 391M. Clinical Exploration in Nursing - Supervised preceptorship in various agencies allowing the student additional clinical practice with a patient population of interest. Open to students eligible to enroll in NURS 300 level courses. Offered every term, including summer. One to four semester hours.

All required 300 level nursing courses must be completed before a non-licensed or LPN to RN student may enroll in 400 level nursing courses with the exception of nursing electives with instructor permission.

NURS 403. Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing - A focus on the psychotherapeutic management associated with mental health, mental illness, and chemical substance abuse, including pharmacology, therapeutic nurse client communication, and environmental considerations. Through the use of the nursing process, complex intervention modalities are discussed. Co-requisite: NURS 403C. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours; three clock hours.

NURS 403C. Psychiatric Mental Health Nursing Clinical - A practicum experience in a variety of in-patient and community-based settings designed to provide students with opportunities to promote mental health and provide independent and collaborative nursing interventions for clients diagnosed with mental illness. Co-requisite: NURS 403. Offered fall term each year. Two semester hours; six clock hours.

NURS 410. Critical Care Nursing - The study of actions and reactions that place a client in a potential or actual life-threatening state. Using the nursing process format, critical care interventions are discussed. Co-requisite: NURS 410C. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours; three clock hours.

NURS 410C. Critical Care Nursing Clinical - A clinical practicum experience providing opportunities, within a high-tech setting, to utilize the nursing process to implement critical care intervention modalities with clients experiencing potential or actual life-threatening states. Co-requisite: NURS 410. Offered fall term each year. Two semester hours; six clock hours.

NURS 420. Nursing Leadership and Management - An examination of nursing care within a rapidly changing health care delivery system. Leadership skills and management strategies necessary for appropriate and effective holistic nursing care are explored and analyzed. The use of outcome measures to promote quality and cost-effective health care in various organizations and health care delivery systems is emphasized. Prerequisites: NURS403/403C and 410/410C or equivalents. Co-requisite: NURS 420P. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours; three clock hours.

NURS 420P. Nursing Leadership and Management Preceptorship - An intensive clinical practicum experience focusing on the application of the nursing management process for organizing and facilitating the delivery of comprehensive, holistic, efficient, and effective nursing care to groups of clients in a variety of settings. Students are expected to demonstrate competencies of professional accountability and responsibility within established standards and guidelines. Co-requisite: NURS 420. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours; twelve clock hours.

NURS 421. Nursing Leadership, Management and Professional Role Integration - Building upon existing RN practice experience, an examination of nursing care within a rapidly changing health care delivery system. Leadership skills and management strategies necessary for appropriate and effective holistic nursing care are explored and analyzed. The use of outcome measures to promote quality and cost-effective health care in various organizations and health care delivery systems is emphasized. Pre-requisites: Current RN licensure; NURS 422, 422C. Co-requisite: NURS 421P. Offered summer term each year. Three semester hours; three clock hours. (First course offering summer 2015)

NURS 421P. Nursing Leadership, Management and Professional Role Integration Practicum - Building upon existing RN practice experience, an intensive clinical practicum experience focusing on the application of the nursing management process for organizing and facilitating the delivery of comprehensive, holistic, efficient, and effective nursing care to groups of clients in a variety of settings. Co-requisite: NURS 421. Offered summer term each year. Three semester hours; twelve clock hours. (First course offering summer 2015)

NURS 422. Nursing in Community Health Systems - A focus on the concepts and skills required by nurses to promote and preserve the health of populations within existing public health infrastructures and in developing community partnerships. Emphasis is placed on independent and collaborative nursing interventions used to meet the health care needs of a variety of aggregate and “at risk” community populations. Prerequisites: NURS 403/403C and 410/410C, or equivalents. Co-requisite: NURS 422C. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours; three clock hours.

NURS 422C. Nursing in Community Health Systems Clinical - A clinical practicum experience that provides students opportunities to practice the role of the community health nurse within the current public health care delivery system. Students are also assigned to work with a variety of at risk aggregate population groups within the community in order to assess their health needs, and design and implement appropriate independent and collaborative nursing interventions. Co-requisite: NURS 422. Offered spring term each year. Two semester hours; six clock hours.

NURS 460. Nursing Capstone Seminar - A seminar course designed to promote review, reflection, and integration of all nursing curriculum content. The course includes completion of the application process, in-depth review, preparation for the NCLEX-RN examination, and nursing major outcomes assessment testing at designated passing standards. Students not completing the outcomes assessment testing at the designated passing standard during their initial enrollment in NURS 460 (spring semester of their senior year) will complete a remediation plan(s) and retest in subsequent terms until course outcomes are met. Students who do not meet course outcomes in their initial semester of enrollment must register for NURS 460 each subsequent term, beginning with Summer Term I, until course requirements are met (see “Senior Major Exam" under Nursing Program catalog description on Page 132). Enrollment limited to students in their last semester of nursing curriculum. Offered every term including summer. One semester hour.

NURS 480. Parish Nursing - An elective course that provides students an opportunity to assist and function in a parish nursing role, providing health promotion opportunities which seek to unite the physical and spiritual aspects of wellness for the members of a selected church congregation. The course includes a service-learning component in select churches within the community. Prerequisites: NURS 310/310C or equivalents. Offered fall and spring term; dependent on student demand. Three semester hours; three clock hours.

NURS 490. Independent Study - Special topics and/or experiences not addressed within the curriculum and non-substitutable for required courses in the major but of special interest to the student. Coursework is to be accomplished independently under a pre-approved contract with a designated faculty member. Prerequisites: Department approval of proposal. Option available every term. One to three semester hours; one to three clock hours.

NURS 491. Clinical Exploration in Nursing - Supervised preceptorship in various agencies allowing the student additional clinical practice with a patient population of interest. Prerequisite: Open to students eligible to enroll in 400 level nursing courses. Offered every term including summers. One to four semester hours.

NURS 499A. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students craft a research proposal, prepare a literature review, and outline the methods by which they plan to conduct research. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

NURS 499B. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students complete their research in a manner consistent with practices in their discipline and submit a written draft of their findings to their mentor. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

NURS 499C. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students revise their research and present their findings publicly. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

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OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY

OT 501. Diagnostic Considerations for Occupational Therapy - A review of major pathophysiological and psychosocial conditions including clinical descriptions, etiology, routine diagnostic procedures, progression of the condition, medical management, prognosis and outcomes. From an occupational performance perspective, information is presented in terms of how the condition might affect and influence sensorimotor, cognitive, psychosocial, self-care, productivity, and leisure functioning. A clinical team approach and legal issues of mental health are presented. Offered fall term each year. Four semester hours.

OT 510. Christ and Calling in Health Care - A seminar class designed to help students integrate their faith into health service provision and administration. Issues addressed include exploration of Christ as a healer, exploration of self and one’s calling, scientific study of the impact of religion on health care, appropriate avenues of ministry in health care, and how to surmount obstacles to compassion in American health care culture. Offered fall term each year. One semester hour.

OT 531. Musculoskeletal Anatomy - A regional study of human muscular and skeletal anatomy with particular emphasis on the back and upper extremity. Course includes cadaver dissection, demonstration, and lecture. This course is available to undergraduate students with senior status. Undergraduate prerequisites: senior status, BIOL 250 or 330, and consent of instructor. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

OT 532. Functional Neuroanatomy - A presentation of human neuroanatomy with implications for abnormality and subsequent therapy treatment. The course includes the study of human nervous system specimens in a laboratory setting. This course is available to undergraduate students with senior status. Undergraduate prerequisite: consent of instructor. This course may be taken by undergraduate students to fulfill one four-hour laboratory science requirement in the GER. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

OT 535. Kinesiology - Human Movement - A study of the principles of human movement including analysis of biomechanics, joint structure and function, muscle physiology, and musculoskeletal function. An introduction is given to methods to improve movement quality in functional performance. Prerequisites: OT 501 and 531 or consent of the instructor. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

OT 560. Foundation of Occupations - Occupation is the foundation of our profession.  In this course students will begin to learn the significance of occupation in the history and current practice of the profession of occupational therapy.  Other topics that will be discussed with an occupation-based focus include theory development and use in practice, cultural influences, activity analysis, the therapeutic relationship, evidence based practice and the OT Practice Framework.  The development of professional writing skills is an integral component of this course.  Offered fall term each year.  Four semester hours.

OT 580. Research Design and Methods in Occupational Therapy I - An introduction to research design with emphasis on occupational therapy literature and skill development in review of research literature, formulation of problem statements, research design, and critical analysis of published research. Research methodology is reviewed with emphasis on recognizing and dealing with threats to methodological validity and reliability.  Students identify research interests with occupational therapy applications or focus. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

OT 605. Lifespan Occupational Development - The study of typical occupational development of infants through young adulthood with emphasis upon the functional roles typical for children and adults within a variety of cultural settings, i.e. self-care, play, school, family, self-care, care of others, work, leisure, friend relationships, and community interactions. Activities and tasks reflective of role functioning are analyzed. Three semester hours.

OT 610. Play/Leisure - The exploration of play/leisure as a primary performance area of occupational therapy. Laboratory experience in play/leisure skills evaluation and training for the physically, mentally, and cognitively disabled. This course emphasizes evaluation and training with a life-span perspective. Strategies that promote adaptation to disabilities and that increase role independence include: using play/leisure activities in therapeutic intervention, adapting media and play/leisure tasks to specific disabling conditions. Offered spring term each year. Two semester hours.

OT 615. Work Programs in Occupational Therapy: Principles and Practice - Major vocational theories and occupational therapy frames of references will be explored. The assessment and intervention of work dysfunction related to physical, cognitive, and mental impairments are addressed. Assessment and intervention skills include: prevocational, job analysis, work/functional capacity, and ergonomics.  Legal issues related to the Americans with Disabilities Act, Individual with Disabilities Education Act, workers’ compensation, and Social Security Disability are included. Opportunities for occupational therapists to serve as consultants to various industries are explored.  Prerequisites: OT 501, 531 and 535 or consent of the instructor. Offered fall term each year. Two semester hours.

OT 620. Activities of Daily Living - Laboratory experience in the evaluation, intervention, and training of basic and instrumental activities of daily living for the physically, mentally, and cognitively disabled. This course focuses on a range of implementation strategies including environmental adaptation, use and design of adaptive equipment, restructuring cognitive complexity, and training caregivers to assist individuals in regaining functional independence in meaningful activities. Prerequisites: OT 501, 531, 532, 535 and 560 or consent of the instructor. Offered fall term each year. Two semester hours.

OT 631. Psychosocial Theory and Practice - The study and application of psychosocial components of occupational therapy practice in all areas of practice with a focus on mental health diagnoses and an emphasis on the development of the therapeutic relationship. Psychosocial theories and occupational theories such as the Model of Human Occupation along with related intervention strategies are addressed through coursework and community service learning experiences. Prerequisites: OT 501 and 532 or consent of the instructor. Offered fall term each year. Five semester hours.

OT 632. Occupational Therapy in Pediatrics - A developmental approach to principles of occupational therapy with infants and children, including evaluation, treatment planning, treatment techniques, discharge planning, and working with care givers. Prerequisites: OT 501 and 531 or consent of the instructor. Offered spring term each year. Five semester hours.

OT 643. Orthopedic Dysfunction Theory and Practice - A holistic approach to the theory and practice of occupational therapy with adults, including evaluation, intervention planning, intervention techniques, and discontinuation of services. Interaction with caregivers and team members will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on general orthopedic conditions, upper extremity dysfunction, and splinting skills. Prerequisites: OT 501, 531, 532 and 535 or consent of the instructor. Offered fall term each year. Four semester hours.

OT 644. Neurological Dysfunction Theory and Practice - A holistic approach to the theory and practice of occupational therapy with adults, including evaluation, intervention planning, intervention techniques, and discontinuation of services. Interaction with caregivers and team members will be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on neurological conditions. Prerequisites: OT 501, 531, 532, 535 and 643 or consent of the instructor. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

OT 651. Group Process - A presentation of group theory and group dynamics. The instruction in basic group skills includes selecting a theory base, designing groups, writing group protocols, analyzing group activities, implementing specific group techniques, and evaluating progress of group members. Prerequisite: OT 631 or consent of the instructor. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

OT 652.  Occupational Therapy in Geriatrics - A developmental approach to the principles of occupational therapy for the older adult including typical occupational development, evaluation, intervention planning, intervention techniques, discharge planning, and working with care providers. Prerequisites: OT 501, 605, 531, 532, and 535 or consent of the instructor. Offered spring term each year. Two semester hours.

OT 680. Research Design and Methods in Occupational Therapy II - A continuation of OT 580 with an emphasis on sampling techniques, survey construction, grant writing, and advanced critique and analysis of published research. Also, a practical review of basic data analysis techniques used in qualitative and quantitative research formats, including experience in using SPSS data analysis software. Prerequisite: OT 580. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours

OT 691A. Fieldwork Level IA - Introductory fieldwork level I experiences in the area of pediatric occupational therapy settings under the supervision of clinicians. Offered spring term each year. One semester hour.

OT 691B. Fieldwork Level IB - Introductory fieldwork level I experiences in the area of psychosocial occupational therapy settings under the supervision of clinicians. Offered fall term each year. One semester hour.

OT 691C.  Fieldwork Level IC - Introductory fieldwork level I experience in the area of physical dysfunction occupational therapy settings under the supervision of clinicians. Offered spring term each year. One credit hour.

OT 710. Leading and Managing Occupational Therapy Services - The study of the occupational therapist’s role in service management and the health care system. Professional values, attitudes, ethics, and standards are emphasized. The study involves skill development in consultation, continuous quality improvement, program evaluation, strategic planning, marketing, and budgeting. Trends in health care and third-party reimbursement are examined. Prerequisites: OT 560, 580, 615, 631, 632, 643 and 680 or consent of the instructor. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

OT 740. Professional Development Seminar - Seminar that prepares students for Level II Fieldwork, the NBCOT examination, entry level occupational therapy positions and ongoing professional development. Students integrate academic knowledge, personal interests, educational experiences and reflective thinking skills to develop a program of learning activities to prepare them for their future responsibilities and opportunities. An independent O.T. Expo capstone project is designed and developed by each student. Prerequisites: OT 631, 632, 643, 691 A, B and 695 A, B or consent of the instructor. Offered spring term each year. Two semester hours.

OT 750. Specialization Elective - A course directed toward students’ exposure to clinical areas of practice of their own choosing. Offered fall and spring terms each year. Prerequisites: OT 615, 631, 632, and 643 or consent of the instructor. Two semester hours.

OT 751. Specialization Elective - A course directed toward students’ exposure to clinical areas of practice of their own choosing. Offered fall and spring terms each year. Prerequisites: OT 615, 631, 632, and 643 or consent of the instructor. Two semester hours.

OT 780A, B, and C. Directed Research - Group research project or individual research project supervised by appropriate faculty. Students will participate in one hour in conjunction with OT 680 and OT 685. During the fall semester of their second year, students will take two hours of directed research to have release time for data collection. Students will defend their research in the final semester. One semester hour for 780A and 780C and two semester hours for 780 B.

OT 791A. Fieldwork Level IIA - A full-time supervised clinical experience designed to develop entry-level professional skills, consisting of a three-month full-time affiliation in a selected treatment setting. Offered every term. Five semester hours.

OT 791B. Fieldwork Level IIB - A full-time supervised clinical experience designed to develop entry-level professional skills, consisting of a three-month full-time affiliation in a selected treatment setting. Offered every term. Five semester hours.

OT 791C. Fieldwork Level IIC (optional) - A full-time supervised clinical experience in a specialized area. A minimum of six weeks duration is required. Offered every term. Three to five semester hours.

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PHILOSOPHY

PHIL 151. Logic - A study of the principles of correct reasoning.  The course consists of a survey of the basic concepts of logic, the uses and abuses of language in everyday discourse, the concepts of inductive and deductive reasoning, and effective application of those concepts in the development and analysis of arguments in a wide variety of fields. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

PHIL 301. How to Live Well: Ancient Philosophy and Enduring Questions - An introduction to the ancient philosophical traditions that have shaped and continue to shape the West. Focuses primarily on the works of Plato and Aristotle but also attends to the so-called Pre-Socratics and to some later Hellenistic and Roman philosophers. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours.

PHIL 302. Modern Western Philosophy and Its Critics - An introduction to several modern philosophical traditions that have shaped and continue to shape the West. Focuses not only on important modernist philosophers (such as Descartes, Locke, and Kant), but also their modernist and postmodernist critics. Offered occasionally. Three semester hours.

PHIL 321. Ethics - An introduction to the character of ethical reflection through the study of important philosophical texts and traditions of moral reflection, as well as through contemporary literature and film. Offered fall term alternate years. Three semester hours.

PHIL 350. Religions of the World - An introduction to a wide variety of religious traditions, such as Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, and others. This course fulfills the ethnic studies course requirement in the general education core. Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester hours.

PHIL 489. Directed Readings - A supervised program of readings which provides for study of material not included in the regular course offerings. One to three semester hours.

PHIL 490. Directed Studies - A program of readings and conferences which provides for individualized study. One to three semester hours.

PHIL 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from semester to semester. One to three semester hours.

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PHYSICS

PHYS 104. Earth and Space Science - A study of the structure and mechanical principles of the universe. Recommended for students with backgrounds in high school algebra and science. Not applicable toward a science major except for those pursuing middle grades licensure. Offered fall and spring terms. Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week. Four semester hours.

PHYS 108. How Things Work - A non-major science course which investigates the application of basic physics principles to the objects around us. Topics include mechanics, heat, light, sound, and electricity. Three hours lecture and one two-hour laboratory per week. Offered occasionally. Four semester hours.

PHYS 203-204. General Physics/Calculus - A study of the fundamental principles of mechanics and thermodynamics in the first semester and electricity and magnetism, wave motions, sound, light, and modern physics in the second semester. Prerequisite: Mathematics 201 or 211. Offered as a year sequence beginning with the fall term each year. Three hours lecture and one three-hour laboratory weekly. Four semester hours each semester.

PHYS 311. Wave Phenomena - An introduction to waves in mechanical, electronic, and optical systems, which teaches students mathematical methods in physics such as complex variables and Fourier analysis. Topics include simple oscillations, resonance, superposition, normal modes, traveling waves, electromagnetic waves, interference, and diffraction. Prerequisite: PHYS 204 and MATH 303 or consent of the instructor. Offered fall term each year. Four semester hours. 

PHYS 351. Quantum Mechanics - Analysis of atomic scale systems, including experimental background, solutions of Schrödinger’s equation, quantization of angular momentum, and applications and interpretations. Prerequisite: PHYS 311. Offered spring term each year. Four semester hours.

PHYS 352. Analytical Mechanics - Analysis of the motion and energy of macroscopic particles and rigid bodies. Topics include equations of motion, central forces, gravitation and orbits, rotating systems and bodies, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian analysis, and generalized coordinates. Prerequisite: PHYS 311. Offered fall term even years. Four semester hours.

PHYS 354. Thermal Physics - Analysis of the statistical mechanics of microstates and entropy as the formal basis for thermodynamics of gases, heat engines, and kinetic theory. Prerequisite: PHYS 311. Offered spring term odd years. Four semester hours.

PHYS 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in the regular course offerings. Topics vary from semester to semester. Offered as needed. One to three semester hours.

PHYS 499A. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students craft a research proposal, prepare a literature review, and outline the methods by which they plan to conduct research. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

PHYS 499B. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students complete their research in a manner consistent with practices in their discipline and submit a written draft of their findings to their mentor. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

PHYS 499C. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students revise their research and present their findings publicly. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

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POLITICAL SCIENCE

POLS 120. American National Government – A survey of the structure and function of the American national government. Special attention is given to the historical development of the American Constitution and the modern relationship between the three branches of government. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

POLS 203. State and Local Government – A study of the structure and function of state and local governments in the United States and the political environment in which they exist. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

POLS 210. Introduction to International Relations – A survey of the interactions between states, and the theories that attempt to explain these relationships. Issues facing the international community such as nuclear disarmament, human rights, and security are also examined. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

POLS 220. Comparative Politics – A systematic survey of the political institutions and behavior of various countries. The operation of contemporary governments around the world is highlighted. Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours.

POLS 230. Politics and Culture of Latin America – An introduction to modern Latin America. Particular emphasis is placed on the political culture and recent democratization (or lack thereof) throughout Central America, South America, and the Caribbean. Specific countries and case studies are used to illustrate general political trends throughout the region. Offered fall term odd years. Three semester hours.

POLS 290. Independent Study – Individualized study to enable the student either to study material in a field not now in the curriculum or to facilitate an individualized approach in a field not now covered in a single course. Not open to freshmen. To be arranged. One to three semester hours.

POLS 304. Law and Globalization – An examination of the function of law in the globalization era both domestically and internationally. Emphasis will be given to understanding the importance and influence of governmental institutions and specific laws upon individual societies, in particular, developing countries. This course fulfills the ethnic studies course requirement in the general education core. Cross-listed as LS 304. Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours.

POLS 310. Philosophy of Law – A detailed study of judicial decision-making and its relationship to the handling of disputes at different levels of the legal structure and various stages of the legal process. Using case-law materials, the techniques of legal reasons and styles of legal thinking, along with the ways in which judicial decisions are able to respond to the demands of social change, are investigated. Consideration is given to techniques of reading legal texts, strategies of interpretation, legal reasoning, decision-making, and persuasion. Cross-listed as LS 310. Offered fall term even years. Three semester hours.

POLS 320. Constitutional Law – A survey of the historical development of the American Constitution with emphasis on the role of the judicial branch of the government as arbiter in determining the respective limits on national and state power, in protecting the individual, and in securing civil rights. Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours.

POLS 330. Public Policy – An examination of different political policies in the United States, how these policies are created, and their consequences. Possible topics include healthcare, education, taxation, environmental regulation, and immigration. Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours.

POLS 340. Politics and the Media – A study of political communication and the relationship between the “fourth branch” and American political institutions. Particular topics include news and dissemination of information, news as entertainment, and the language and discourse of politics. Offered fall term odd years. Three semester hours.

POLS 350. American Foreign Policy – An analysis of trends, patterns, and change in the making of American foreign policy since World War II. Issues of internationalism, isolationism, power, morality, and pragmatism will be analyzed and used as a lens to understand the foreign policy making process. Offered fall term even years. Three semester hours.

POLS 360. The Presidency – An examination of the American presidency as a political institution, and of the leadership of the people who have held this position. Offered fall term odd years. Three semester hours.

POLS 370. Political Problems of Developing Countries – A survey of the political institutions and economic problems of the developing countries found in Latin America, Asia, and Africa. Particular attention is paid to the consequences of political decisions on economic development. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

POLS 402. Political Theory – An in-depth examination of major political theories in western thought and their implications for the state, the individual, progress, freedom, and justice. Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours.

POLS 460. Tennessee Intercollegiate Legislature – A course preparing students to compete at the Tennessee Intercollegiate Legislature in Nashville. Students will conduct in-depth research on the state government in Tennessee, write a draft resolution, and engage in research projects, debate, oral reports, and simulation. Offered as available. May be taken for one to three semester hours.

POLS 470. Politics, Religion, and International Conflict – An examination of the role of religion within international political conflicts, including the relationship between religious communities and violence. Particular attention is paid to the conditions under which religion can aggravate or alleviate conflict. The course uses recent historical and contemporary case studies to explore the influence of religion on disputes regarding statehood, political independence, and terrorism. Offered fall term even years. Three semester hours.

POLS 480. Model United Nations – A survey of the history and work of the United Nations and its role in contemporary politics.  Students will conduct in-depth research on a specific country’s role within the United Nations, and engage in research products, debate, oral reports, and in-class simulation in order to prepare for competition at a regional Model United Nations meeting. Offered as available. May be taken for one to three semester hours.

POLS 489. Directed Readings – Supervised independent readings for a greater depth or a different approach than provided in other courses. Prerequisite: POLS 120. To be arranged. One to three semester hours.

POLS 490. Directed Studies – A program of readings and conferences which provides for individualized study. To be arranged. One to three semester hours.

POLS 491. Field Work – A practicum experience that involves the student in a supervised position in government for the joint purpose of learning about government and possible professional choices. Prerequisite: POLS 120. To be arranged. One to three semester hours.

POLS 494. Capstone: Senior Seminar – A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, and writing regarding such issues as Christianity, law, governance, politics, and social justice. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

POLS 495.  Seminar – A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: Political Science 120. To be announced. One to three semester hours.

POLS 499A. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students craft a research proposal, prepare a literature review, and outline the methods by which they plan to conduct research. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

POLS 499B. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students complete their research in a manner consistent with practices in their discipline and submit a written draft of their findings to their mentor. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

POLS 499C. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students revise their research and present their findings publicly. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

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PSYCHOLOGY

PSYC 150. General Psychology - An introduction to the discipline of psychology. The study covers the background, methodology, and major findings from each of the major sub-areas of psychology. Offered every term. Three semester hours.

PSYC 170. Puzzle of Life A course designed to raise students’ self-awareness by asking them to explore their personal value systems, attitudes toward relationships, personality styles, and philosophy toward money. The course examines and encourages healthy relationship dynamics, responsible money management, and thoughtful examination of students’ own behaviors.All of these will be considered in light of students’ values, personality types, and developmental stages. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

PSYC 200. Career Preparation in Psychology - An introduction to career options for psychology students. The course helps students to understand the variety of sub-fields within psychology and the different careers that are available within each. Students begin to explore career options and make preparations for reaching occupational goals, such as getting into graduate school. Offered spring term alternate years. One semester hour.

PSYC 252. Developmental Psychology - An introduction to development through the entire life span, the realms of emotional, social, physical, and cognitive growth and change; the major theories of development, the interactions and reciprocities among physical, psychological, social, familial, and individual issues. The study is applicable to students in psychology, nursing, education, ministry, and any student who desires a knowledge and appreciation of change and stability, growth and atrophy, throughout life. Offered every term. Three semester hours.

PSYC 253. Child Development - An in-depth study of the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development of the child from birth through adolescence. Development, care, and guidance of the child are examined in relationship to major theories of child and adolescent development. This course is designed for professionals who work with infants, children, and adolescents in a variety of settings. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

PSYC 253B. Child Development - An in-depth study of the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development of the child from birth through adolescence. Development, care, and guidance of the child are examined in relationship to major theories of child and adolescent development. This course is designed for professionals who work with infants, children, and adolescents in a variety of settings. Offered first term. Three semester hours.

PSYC 254. Adolescent Development - An introduction to the stage of adolescence including focus on physical, psychological, and primarily emotional development during the teen years. Adolescence is a critical period of development in which one’s identity as an individual grows significantly. The tools of this course are the biographies of adolescents, materials from popular culture, and readings of the social nature of the lives of teens. Offered every other spring. Three semester hours.

PSYC 259. Research Methods in Psychology I - A study of research methodologies in psychology with special emphasis upon experimentation. The study covers research planning, experimental design, data collection and analysis, and the construction of models and theories. Laboratory work emphasizes application of these concepts. Prerequisite or corequisite: PSYC 150 or Mathematics 213. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

PSYC 260. Sport Psychology - An overview of the psychological factors affecting behavior in exercise and sport settings. The course examines the major topics in sport psychology, including personality, motivation, arousal, imagery, goal setting, and burnout. The goal is that students would be able to apply this knowledge to instructional, training, and rehabilitation settings. Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester hours.

PSYC 270. Positive Psychology – An overview of the field of positive psychology. As such, attention is given to the study of the psychological aspects of a fulfilling and flourishing life, rather than psychology’s traditional focus on psychopathology. Attention is given to how individuals reach their highest potential and how they live meaningful lives. Students are challenged to apply the emerging findings in the field to their own lives. Offered fall term alternate years. Three semester hours.

PSYC 280.  Media Effects on Children and Adolescents - A seminar course in media literacy with an emphasis on the psychological, social, and educational effects on children and adolescents. The course includes discussion of the evolving nature of media and laws governing them. Such media include television, movies, the Internet, newspapers, magazines, music, and interactive video games. Discussion and assignments focus on the relative impact of these media on things such as body image, drug and alcohol use, sexuality, sociability, morality, and cognitive development. An emphasis is placed on becoming a media literacy advocate within one’s own family, school, and community. Offered occasionally. Cross-listed as COMM 280 and EDUC 280. Three semester hours.

PSYC 290. Independent Study - Individual study to enable the student either to examine material not in the curriculum or to facilitate an individualized approach in a field not now covered in a single course. Not open to freshmen. Offered as needed. One to three semester hours.

PSYC 350. Social Psychology - A study of the individual in society. Some emphasis is given to research and experimentation. Offered every term. Three semester hours.

PSYC 353. Theories of Personality - An examination of major theories of personality from the late 1800s to the present. The course focuses particularly on founders and influential theorists associated with the major theories. Each theory is examined in terms of a Christian worldview. Prerequisite: PSYC 150. This course is open to juniors and seniors. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

PSYC 356. Cross-Cultural Psychology - An examination of culture’s influence on behavior and thought. Students are expected to develop an understanding of cultural diversity from a psychological perspective. Students have the opportunity to participate in a service-learning experience throughout the semester and visit culturally relevant sites on a class trip. The course includes explorations of cross-cultural perspectives on cognition, intelligence, health, emotion, communication, human development, personality, psychological disorders, and social behavior. This course fulfills the ethnic studies course requirement in the general education core. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

PSYC 356B. Cross-Cultural Psychology - An examination of culture’s influence on behavior and thought. Students are expected to develop an understanding of cultural diversity from a psychological perspective. Students participate in a cultural--learning experience throughout the term. The course includes exploration of cross-cultural perspectives on cognitive, intelligence, health, emotions, communication, human development, personality, psychological disorders, and social behavior. This course fulfills the ethnic studies course requirement in the general education core. Offered fourth term. Three semester hours.

PSYC 357. Introduction to the Theory and Practice of Counseling - An introduction to the theories of counseling and psychotherapy  with some emphasis on practicing the skills that constitute the counseling process. Class members observe and practice applications and implementation of techniques in the therapeutic process. The course encourages a balanced view of the major  contributions, strengths, and limitations of various therapies. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

PSYC 358. Abnormal Psychology - A careful consideration of the data and principles which have proved helpful in interpreting deviations from normal behavior. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

PSYC 401. History and Systems of Psychology - An overview of the historical context as well as the social and cultural milieus in which contemporary psychological theories evolved. History and Systems of Psychology is a capstone course and should be taken in the senior year. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

PSYC 410. Central Appalachia - An examination of the use of the natural and human resources of the Appalachian region and the consequences for the region and its people by the consumption of these resources. Students will examine the wealth of resources, both natural and human, that have fueled the economic development of the United States through the nation’s industrial history as well as the effects of multiple factors on the people of the region. This class includes both in-class and fieldwork experiences. This course fulfills the ethnic studies course requirement in the general education core.  Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

PSYC 422. Learning and Cognition - A study of basic principles of learning, cognition, and memory and their applications. The controversy of the relative effects of nature and nurture on learning is studied, as are types of learning and cognition and their methods of acquisition.. Three semester hours.

PSYC 527. Physiological Psychology - An examination of current developments in the field of physiological psychology. The course includes an exploration of the physiological bases of emotion, sleep, sexual behavior, hunger and thirst, learning and memory, psychopathology, and drug use and abuse. Prerequisites: PSYC 150 and 259. Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester hours.

PSYC 435. Child Sexual Abuse - An examination of current research and theory regarding child sexual abuse, including prevalence, causes, dynamics, consequences, and prevention. Attention is given to treatment approaches and techniques in working with individuals and families involved in sexual abuse situations. This course is open to juniors and seniors. Offered intermittently. Three semester hours.

PSYC 470. Human Sexuality - An examination of human sexuality from physiological, psychological, cultural, and spiritual perspectives. Sexuality will be viewed from within a Christian value framework. The course is open to juniors and seniors. Offered fall term alternate years. Three semester hours.

PSYC 480. Seminar on Vietnam - A survey of the Vietnam era in United States history. This course examines precursors in the United States and Southeast Asia, the Vietnam era itself, and the war’s legacies to the nation and its people. Both historical and psychological issues are examined. This course fulfills the ethnic studies course requirement in the general education requirements. Offered spring term even years. Cross-listed as HIST 480. Three semester hours.

PSYC 489. Directed Readings - A supervised program of readings which provides for study of material not included in the regular course offerings. To be arranged. One to three semester hours.

PSYC 490. Directed Studies - A program of readings and conferences which provides for individualized study. To be arranged. One to three semester hours.

PSYC 491. Field Work in Psychology - Supervised field work in various institutions and agencies, including children’s homes, schools, homes for the aging, delinquency and probation programs and work with other agencies. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor. Offered every term. Three to six semester hours.

PSYC 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from semester to semester. To be announced. One to three semester hours.

PSYC 499A. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students craft a research proposal, prepare a literature review, and outline the methods by which they plan to conduct research. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

PSYC 499B. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students complete their research in a manner consistent with practices in their discipline and submit a written draft of their findings to their mentor. Offered every semester as needed.  One semester hour.

PSYC 499C. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students revise their research and present their findings publicly. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

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PUBLIC LEADERSHIP AND SERVICE

PL&S 301. Introduction to Leadership in Organizations – This course is an introduction to leadership with a focus on developing effective skills for organizational leadership. This course will examine the behaviors of leaders in today’s organizations by studying current leadership theories and the theories’ application. Students will use readings, behavior modeling, experiential exercises, and self-reflection, as well as focused coaching and feedback, to optimize their own leadership capabilities in handling real world, day-to-day leadership functions in an ethical and effective manner. The content of this course is suitable for students in all disciplines. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

PL&S 491. Field Work in Public Leadership and Service – Supervised field work in various institutions and public service agencies including children’s homes and after school care programs, homes for the aging, local agencies serving the poor and homeless, and other persons in need. Students may develop other options in collaboration with the instructor. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. To be arranged. Offered every term. Three semester hours.

PL&S 499A. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students craft a research proposal, prepare a literature review, and outline the methods by which they plan to conduct research. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

PL&S 499B. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students complete their research in a manner consistent with practices in their discipline and submit a written draft of their findings to their mentor. Offered every semester as needed.  One semester hour.

PL&S 499C. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students revise their research and present their findings publicly. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

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SOCIAL WORK

SOWK 210. Principles of Social Work – An introduction to the profession of social work and an overview of the professional knowledge, skills, and values necessary for generalist social work practice. The student is introduced to the historical evolution of social work, the history of social welfare, the various fields of social work practice, and general systems theory. Offered spring term even years. Three credit hours.

SOWK 310. Human Behavior in the Social Environment – A study of human behavior from a person-in-environment perspective. The course is designed to help the student recognize the unique challenges confronting individuals and families at both the micro and macro levels. Special emphasis will be placed on understanding the relationship between the individual and various systems impacting the individual including the social, psychological, and spiritual-cultural systems. Adaptive strategies that people employ to cope with adversity will be examined. Examination of a strength-based, problem-solving approach, which constitutes the assessment phase of generalist practice at the micro level, will be emphasized as well. Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours.

SOWK 491. Field Work in Social Work – Supervised field work in various institutions and agencies, including children’s homes, schools, homes for the aging, delinquency and probation programs, and other social agencies. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Offered every term. Three semester hours.

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SOCIOLOGY

SOCL 195.  Seminar – A seminar designed to promote lectures, discussion, research, and writing at an introductory level in areas not included in the regular course offerings.  Topics considered vary from semester to semester.  One to three semester hours.

SOCL 201. Introduction to Sociology - A scientific study of human society and the various means by which individuals and groups adjust to each other and to their physical and social environment. Offered every term. Three semester hours.

SOCL 210. Introduction to Cultural Anthropology - A study of the dynamics of culture and society: folkways, mores, and institutions and their significance for comprehending the variations in contemporary cultural orientations, customs, and manners. Available to sophomores, juniors, and seniors. This course fulfills the ethnic studies course requirement in the general education core. Offered spring semester. Three semester hours.

SOCL 211. Social Problems - An application of sociological perspectives to understanding major problems confronted in American society and internationally. Topics include crime and delinquency; poverty; homelessness; substance abuse; family and sexual violence; urban problems; ethnic, racial, and political conflicts; and the social dimensions of environmental issues.  This course involves students in a semester-long service-learning project serving the poor and homeless in the local community. Offered fall term alternate years. Three semester hours.

SOCL 221. Latin American Cultures - An introduction to Latin America, focusing on the social, political, economic, religious, and other characteristics of many different Latin American cultures. This course employs research findings and perspectives from several social science  disciplines, including sociology, history, political science, and anthropology to explore the region’s historical development, its cultural diversity, and some of its critical social problems. Students do not have to speak or read any Spanish to take this course. This course fulfills the ethnic studies course requirement in the general education core. Offered fall term alternate years. Three semester hours.

SOCL 250. Social Issues on Film: From Hollywood to Bollywood – An examination of contemporary social issues through the lens of popular cultural images, particularly as portrayed in films. The course will utilize both American-made and international films, from Hollywood to Bollywood. Films, articles, and discussions will focus on issues of social life and social justice, including such topics as racism and civil and indigenous rights, problems in schools, family violence, consumerism, slavery and sex trafficking, the impact of environmental damage on communities, poverty, and immigration. Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester hours.

SOCL 303. Family - A study of the social significance of the modern American family viewed in the perspective of its cultural heritage. Available to juniors and seniors. Offered every term. Three semester hours.

SOCL 312. Gender and Society - An examination of the social construction of femininity and masculinity and their consequences for individuals and societies. Topics include biological theories of gender differences, cross-cultural comparisons of gender expectations, childhood socialization, gender and the educational system, language and the media, gender and relationships, work and economic issues, and body image and health issues. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

SOCL 314. Race and Ethnic Relations - A study of racial and cultural contacts and conflicts, including an analysis of prejudice and discrimination, status and participation of minority groups, and national and international aspects of minority problems. Prerequisite: SOCL 201. This course fulfills the ethnic studies course requirement in the general education core. Offered fall term even years. Three semester hours.

SOCL 321. Sociology of Death, Dying, and Bereavement - An exploration of current social science literature on death, dying and bereavement. The approach is cross-cultural, even though the emphasis is on death and dying customs and practices in North America. Topics include causes and prevention of suicide; funeral customs and planning; living wills; issues concerning euthanasia and assisted suicide; children’s experiences with death and bereavement; capital punishment; widowhood; and varied individual and cultural perspectives on the meaning of death. Offered fall term alternate years. Three semester hours.

SOCL 360. Aspects of Intercultural Studies - A study of inductive and theoretical analyses of the various challenges which result when people from different cultures come into sustained contact and their differing cultural systems (e.g., family life, politics, economics, etc.) intersect in the contemporary world, with special attention to (1) effective approaches to meeting the challenges, and (2) effective communicative strategies. This course fulfills the ethnic studies course requirement in the general education core. Offered fall term odd years. Three semester hours.

SOCL 380. Principles of Social Work - An introduction to the profession of social work and an overview of the professional knowledge, skills, and values necessary for generalist social work practice. The student is introduced to the historical evolution of social work, the history of social welfare, the various fields of social work practice, and general systems theory. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

SOCL 381. Social Welfare Policies and Services - A study of social welfare policy, its theoretical orientations and philosophical underpinnings, as well as private and public social programs and issues which comprise the United States welfare system. Attention is given to those social policies/programs which have a major impact on generalist social work practice. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

SOCL 401. Sociological Research - An introduction to the logic and design of social research including methods of sample selection, questionnaire design, data collection, and informed interpretation of social science  data. Prerequisite: SOCL 201 or permission of instructor. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

SOCL 410. Central Appalachia – An examination of the use of the natural and human resources of the Appalachian region and the consequences for the region and its people by the consumption of these resources. Students examine the wealth of resources, both natural and human, that have fueled the economic development of the United States through the nation’s industrial history as well as the effects of multiple factors on the people of the region. This class includes both in-class and fieldwork experiences. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

SOCL 413. Seminar in Aging - An application of sociological principles, theories, and research findings to the understanding of the process of aging, the relationship of the aged to other segments of the population, and aging in other cultures. Topics include economic needs and resources of older people, issues of health and health care, work and retirement, psychological and physical changes, marriage and other relationships, and death and bereavement. This course involves students in a semester-long service-learning project serving persons aged 65 or older in the local community. Offered spring term alternate years. Three semester hours.

SOCL 421. Sociology of Religion - A study of the dynamic relationships between religious and other social institutions with special attention to the contemporary American religious scene. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

SOCL 440. The Religions, Peoples, and Cultures of Africa - An introduction to the continent and peoples of Africa. Topics include African history, geography, religious life, cultural diversity, historical and current events on the African continent, and missions in Africa. This course fulfills the ethnic studies course requirement in the general education core. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.
SOCL 451. Sociological Theory - A broad survey of sociological thought from the classical  theorists in the nineteenth century to cutting-edge developments in the 21st century. Prerequisite: The prerequisite for sociology majors and traditional sociology minors is SOCL 201. Students pursuing the modified sociology minor for Bible majors with a missions emphasis may have SOCL 210 as their prerequisite for this course. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

SOCL 461. Dynamics of Culture Change - A study of the identification of the processes of culture change, both internal and external, and critical study of theories offered to account for culture change. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

SOCL 470. Health, Illness, and Health Care Systems - This course uses the sociological perspective to analyze illness and health, and to examine medical and health care systems. Topics include social and behavioral influences on illness, health-care funding issues, historical and contemporary issues in nurse-physician relationships, patients’ rights issues, and health issues concerning specific groups such as rural people, ethnic minority group members, people with long-term disabilities, children and teenagers, the poor, the homeless, and women. Usually offered fall term alternate years. Three semester hours.

SOCL 489. Directed Readings - A supervised program of readings which provides for study of material not included in the regular course offerings. TBA. One to three semester hours.

SOCL 490. Directed Studies - A program of readings and conferences which provides for individualized study. To be arranged. One to three semester hours.

SOCL 491. Field Work in Sociology - Supervised field work in various institutions and social service agencies including children’s homes and after school care programs, homes for the aging, local agencies serving the poor and homeless, and  other  persons in need. Students may develop other options, including international study opportunities, in collaboration with the instructor. Prerequisite: SOCL 201 and consent of the instructor. To be arranged. Three or six semester hours.

SOCL 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in the regular course offerings. Topics considered vary from semester to semester. To be announced. One to three semester hours.

SOCL 499A. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students craft a research proposal, prepare a literature review, and outline the methods by which they plan to conduct research. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

SOCL 499B. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students complete their research in a manner consistent with practices in their discipline and submit a written draft of their findings to their mentor. Offered every semester as needed.  One semester hour.

SOCL 499C. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students revise their research and present their findings publicly. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

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SPANISH

SPAN 111-112. Elementary Spanish - A proficiency-oriented introductory course emphasizing oral communicative skills, including the essentials of grammar, practical vocabulary, and basic reading and writing skills within a cultural context. Three class periods and one laboratory period per week. SPAN 111 offered fall term each year; SPAN 112 offered spring term each year. Three semester hours each semester.

 SPAN 211-212. Intermediate Spanish - A proficiency-oriented intermediate course consisting of a review of elementary skills and an integrated development of more complex listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Cultural and literary readings serve as a basis for class discussion and written compositions. Three class periods and one laboratory period per week. Prerequisite: SPAN 112 or equivalent. SPAN 211 usually offered fall term each year; SPAN 212 usually offered spring term each year. Three semester hours each semester.

SPAN 301-302. Advanced Conversation and Composition - Intensive practice in the oral and written language with emphasis on vocabulary, syntax, and culture necessary for communication. Classes are conducted in Spanish. Prerequisites: SPAN 211 and 212 or equivalent. SPAN 301 and 302 offered periodically. Three semester hours each semester.

SPAN 311. Survey of Spanish Literature: Iberian - An overview of the literature of Spain from the Middle Ages to the present. Selections from prominent authors of different periods and genres are read. Readings and discussions are in Spanish. Prerequisites: SPAN 211 and 212 or equivalent. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

SPAN 312. Survey of Spanish-American Literature - An overview of the literature of Latin America from the Colonial Period to the present. Selections from prominent authors of different periods, genres, and countries are read. Readings and discussions are in Spanish. Prerequisites: SPAN 211 and 212 or equivalent. Offered periodically. Three semester hours.

SPAN 401. Civilization and Culture of Spain - A study of Spanish civilization and culture from prehistoric times to the present. Topics include geography, history, political and social structures, culture, and the arts. Readings, class discussion, and reports are in Spanish. Offered periodically. Prerequisites: SPAN 211 and 212 or equivalent. Three semester hours.

SPAN 402. Civilization and Culture of Latin America - A study of Latin American civilization and culture from the ancient Indian civilizations to the present. Topics include geography, history, political and social structures, culture, and the arts. Readings, class discussions, and reports are in Spanish. Offered periodically. This course fulfills the ethnic studies course requirement in the general education core. Prerequisites: SPAN 211 and 212 or equivalent. Three semester hours.

SPAN 490. Directed Studies - A program of readings and conferences which provides for study of material not included in the regular course offerings. Available on demand. One to three semester hours.

SPAN 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, writing, and concentration in areas beyond regular course offerings. Topics vary from semester to semester. Available on demand. One to three semester hours per semester.

SPAN 499A. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students craft a research proposal, prepare a literature review, and outline the methods by which they plan to conduct research. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

SPAN 499B. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students complete their research in a manner consistent with practices in their discipline and submit a written draft of their findings to their mentor. Offered every semester as needed.  One semester hour.

SPAN 499C. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students revise their research and present their findings publicly. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

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THEATRE

THEA 110. Theatre Fundamentals – An introduction of the foundations of text analysis for the stage, presenting common vocabulary and concepts of the theatre event as an art form and examining how theatre is created. Emphasis is placed upon the understanding and appreciation of theatre in today’s society. Course offering to be announced. Three semester hours.

THEA 130. Stagecraft An introduction to the basic principles of theatre production, including application of techniques, use of tools and equipment, and other materials associated with theatre production. Students are required to participate in some facet of technical work for the current semester’s theatre production(s). Offered fall term odd years. Three semester hours.

THEA 141. Fundamentals of Voice/Stage Movement - A survey course introducing the student to major vocal production and stage movement theorists as well as an introduction to stage dialects and stage combat. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

THEA 151. Introduction to Theatre - The history and literature of the theatre from its Greek origins to the present. This course is designed to help the student relate drama in its historical context to contemporary man. Some emphasis is also placed on musical theatre. The course is supplemented by film clips, attendance at area performances and production work on the current semester’s drama production. Cross-listed as COMM 151. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

THEA 170. The Alexander Technique – Introduction to The Alexander Technique, a method of educating the body toward efficient use of the whole self through verbal, visual, and hands-on skills. Offered every term. One semester hour.

THEA 230. Fundamentals of Theatrical Design - An introductory course in the basic elements and principles of theatrical design, including script analysis, research, and basic rendering and modeling techniques. Students will be required to participate in design work for the spring semester’s One Act Play Festival. Prerequisite: THEA 130 (Stagecraft) or equivalent. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

THEA 240. Stage Makeup - An introduction to the basic techniques of stage makeup ranging from the application of personal enhancement, age, character, to special effects makeup. Offered fall term even years. Three semester hours.

THEA 242. Fundamentals of Acting - A study of techniques in acting. Class exercises are designed to develop relaxation, concentration, and improvisation skills. Audition techniques, monologue studies, and scene study are also emphasized. Cross-listed as COMM 242. Offered spring term each year. Three semester hours.

THEA 256. Theatre Practicum - An opportunity to gain experience in practical theatre work: acting, technical work, or directing. This course may be taken multiple times for up to 6 hours of credit. Offered every term. One to two semester hours.

THEA 275. Writing for the Stage and Screen A studio course in writing for film or for the theatre. Students  learn the basics principles of dramatic writing. Students study examples of dramatic writing, compose a critical paper on the film or stage play of their choice, and create an original short script. This course fulfills the screenwriting credit that is prerequisite for all production courses in the film program, and film students may develop scripts that can be produced in subsequent filmmaking courses. The course is offered as an elective for theatre and creative writing students. Cross listed with COMM 275. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

THEA 340. Fundamentals of Directing - A course emphasizing study of the various elements in the production of a play or a short film: theory, selection of play or screenplay, production, interpretation of the play or film, scene design, costumes, and make-up. The course culminates in the direction of a one-act play or short film for the public. This course is especially recommended for students preparing to supervise play or film production in the public schools. Prerequisites for film studies majors: COMM 270 and 323. Offered spring term even years. Three semester hours.

THEA 330-Advanced Theatrical Design - An advanced course employing the elements and principles of theatrical design. Emphasis will be placed on either scenic, lighting, and/or makeup design according to the individuals’ prerequisite fulfillment. Students will be required to participate in design work for the spring semester’s main stage production and/or One Act Play Festival. Prerequisite: THEA 130 Stagecraft and/or THEA 230 Fundamentals of Theatrical Design and/or THEA 240 Stage Make-up or equivalents and consent of instructor. Offered spring term odd years. Three semester hours.

THEA 345. Theatre for Young Audiences - An opportunity to gain experience in touring theatre work. Approval of instructor is required. Offered fall term each year. One to three semester hours.

THEA 470. Dramatic Literature and Criticism - A concentrated program of readings from 20th and 21st century playwrights which will serve to introduce the student to important dramatists. Offered fall term each year. Three semester hours.

THEA 490. Theatre Performance Recital/Portfolio - An individualized course of study to be determined by the student and an advisory committee. Performance students may do this in the form of an acting recital or final directing or playwriting project, while design oriented students may elect to do comprehensive work on preparing their design portfolio. Seniors only. Approval of chair is required. Three semester hours.

THEA 495. Seminar - A seminar designed to promote in-depth discussion, independent research, and writing in areas not included in the regular course offerings. Topics vary from semester to semester. To be announced. One to three semester hours.

THEA 499A. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students craft a research proposal, prepare a literature review, and outline the methods by which they plan to conduct research. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.

THEA 499B. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students complete their research in a manner consistent with practices in their discipline and submit a written draft of their findings to their mentor. Offered every semester as needed.  One semester hour.

THEA 499C. Mentored Research - A faculty-mentored research course in which students revise their research and present their findings publicly. Offered every semester as needed. One semester hour.